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NORTHERN PACIFIC RAILROAD IN BRAINERD


Dedication

This page is dedicated to the workers and families of the Northern Pacific Railroad who struggled, lived and died in order to build the railroad and the city of Brainerd, in particular, to my grandfather, Martin Henry Nelson (1870-1950), who worked for the Northern Pacific for nearly fifty-five years, retiring in 1941 as the Superintendent of the Brainerd Northern Pacific shops.

Ann M. Nelson

Introduction

Contained in the following information is an engraving of the 1888 Northern Pacific Railroad Shops along with a key to the buildings shown in the engraving, a description of the development in 1893 of the Northern Pacific Monad and a Chronology of the development of the Northern Pacific Railroad in Brainerd from 1864-2000.


Key to 1888 Northern Pacific Railroad Shops

1888 Northern Pacific Shops Key
(Brainerd City Directory 1888, E. F. Barrett, Publisher)
(Click on image to download 572 KB High-resolution JPG file)

The first manufacturing establishment of any extent to be inaugurated in the City of Brainerd was the Northern Pacific shops. They are the largest and most complete of any similar works in Minnesota. While nominally intended for use as repair shops for the freight and locomotive departments, they still have the capacity for complete construction and a new locomotive of the best pattern and design could be turned out on short order. They are the principal repair shops east of Livingston, Montana and have virtually all of the locomotives and freight rolling stock of 2,000 miles of road to keep in repair. The works have a capacity for the employment of 1,200 men, 630 now being upon the rolls. The buildings are located in what is known as East Brainerd, about three-fourths of a mile east of the railroad bridge, on both sides of the main line track to Duluth.
The entire plant is valued at over $2,000,000 and is admirably arranged and under the most systematic management. The entire yard is protected from fire by frequent hydrants and has hose and other fire apparatus close at hand, with a well-organized fire department.
Some idea of the relation these works bear to the business prosperity of the city, can be obtained from the fact that the monthly payroll of the shops and the Northern Pacific Railroad operating department here amounts to over $60,000 [sic]. Payments are made by means of checks on the First National Bank of Brainerd and are made as regularly as the fifteenth of every month comes round.

The buildings south of the track are devoted to the Locomotive Repair Works. North of the Duluth main track lie the buildings belonging to the Car Department which at present are devoted to freight equipment exclusively:

GENERAL OFFICE BUILDING and STOREHOUSE (ENGRAVING #1)
This structure is of brick, two stories in height, with slate roof, 43x282 feet in extent and which is located just south of the main track. In this building are the offices of the Master Mechanic, Master Car Builder, Draftsman and Clerks’ offices, a large and nicely furnished Free Reading Room and telegraph and storekeepers’ offices on the ground floor.

BOILER AND TIN SHOP (ENGRAVING #2)
Second comes the Boiler and Tin shop, 80x224, also brick with slate roof and fire proof.

MACHINE AND ERECTING SHOP (ENGRAVING #3)
Third the Machine and Erecting shop 120x244, fire proof like the rest. In this shop all iron and steel work is done and here the locomotives are repaired and fitted for the road.

ENGINE AND BOILER ANNEX (ENGRAVING #4)
From the south end of the Machine and Erecting shop projects an annex 40x80 feet containing the engine and boiler rooms; the former a mammoth Corliss fed by a battery of six large boilers and possessing some 1,500 horse power.

ROUNDHOUSE (ENGRAVING #5)
Just east of the Machine shop is the Roundhouse, 316 feet in diameter and containing stalls for forty-four engines.

BLACKSMITH SHOP (ENGRAVING #6)
South of the Roundhouse is the Blacksmith shop, 80x197 feet, built of brick with slate roof like the others. In this building the forging both heavy and light is done.

IRON AND COAL STOREHOUSES (ENGRAVING #7)
East of this group and still south of the main track are the Iron and Coal storehouses, the former 26x57 feet and the latter 26x98 feet.

OIL HOUSE (ENGRAVING #8)
The Oil House is located south of the track and west of all the buildings named, is 45x62 feet, and like the rest fire proof. It is two stories high and contains six huge tanks on either floor, those on the lower floor having a capacity of 18,000 gallons each, while those on the second floor each hold 12,000 gallons. Immense steam pumps are used to convey the oil from the cars to the different tanks.

PAINT SHOP (ENGRAVING #9)
A frame building 50x240 feet lies north and east of the office.

FOUNDRY (ENGRAVING #10)
The Foundry is 80x235 feet. This establishment is at present under lease to Parker & Topping, but the larger part of their work, and in fact nearly all of it is done for the railroad company.

BRASS FOUNDRY ANNEX (ENGRAVING #11)
The Brass Foundry Annex is 16x33 feet.

ENGINE AND BOILER ANNEX (ENGRAVING #12)
The foundry Engine and Boiler Room Annex is 21x43 feet.

CLEANING ROOM (ENGRAVING #13)
The foundry Cleaning Room for cleaning old castings is 33x46 feet.

CUPOLA ROOM (ENGRAVING #14)
The foundry Cupola Room is 21x36 feet.

CORE ROOMS (ENGRAVING #15)
The four foundry Core Rooms and the Cupola Room are all connected under one roof.

PATTERN STOREHOUSE (ENGRAVING #16)
Located west of the Foundry, the Pattern Storehouse is 40x60 feet; this building is where all the patterns for iron and brass castings for locomotives and cars are kept.

WOOD WORKING SHOP (ENGRAVING #17)
The Wood Working Shop is 65x160 feet. The second floor of the Wood shop is used as a pattern shop where the wood patterns for car and locomotive castings are made.

IRON SHOP ANNEX (ENGRAVING #18)
The Iron Shop Annex, 40x65 feet, is used as an iron shop for axle work and car wheel boring.

OFFICE BUILDING (ENGRAVING #19)
Located North of the Wood Shop, this Office Building is used by the Master Car Builder and Clerks.

FREIGHT CAR REPAIR SHOPS (ENGRAVING #20)
Located North of the Office building for the Master Car Builder and Clerks, the Freight Car Repair Shops is 80x160 feet.

LUMBER DRYING KILN (ENGRAVING #21)
Located West of the Freight Car Repair Shops, the Lumber Drying Kiln is 40x70 feet.

FIRST “ROUNDHOUSE” (ENGRAVING #22)
Built circa 1871.

(Brainerd City Directory 1888
, E. F. Barrett, Publisher; pp. 17-21)

The Story of the Monad


Northern Pacific Trademark
The Monad Symbol
A mystic symbol, the Monad, lies in the center of Northern Pacific's trademark. This symbol dates back nearly 1,000 years, and traces of it can be found at least 4,000 years before that. The design is called the great Chinese Monad or the diagram of the Great Extreme. Traces of this design appear in the bead work of the American Plains Indians. Modified versions of the design are used as good luck tokens in Japan. The Northern Pacific sees it not merely as a symbol of good luck but as a symbol of good transportation.

In 1893, Edwin H. McHenry, Chief Engineer of the Northern Pacific, was visiting the Columbian Exposition in Chicago. He chanced to visit the Korean exhibit. Seeing the Korean flag which bore the Monad in red and blue, he was impressed by the simple but striking design. At that time, NP was searching for a suitable trademark. When he returned to St. Paul, he submitted his idea to Charles Fee, then General Passenger Agent, and together they worked out the emblem which is today so familiar to Americans.

The symbol has deep philosophical meaning. The two comma shaped halves represent the dual powers of the universe ... two principles called Yang and Yin. Their primitive meanings were: Yang, light; Yin, darkness. Philosophically, they stood for the positive and the negative. Many interpretations are assigned to these: male and female, heaven and earth, motion and rest. To the Chinese, the colors of the two elements were apparently unimportant. (The Story of the Monad, Northern Pacific Railway Company, 1933)

A Chronology of the Northern Pacific Railroad in Brainerd, Minnesota


1863
08 May
The Brotherhood of Locomotive Engineers is founded in Marshall, Michigan, as the Brotherhood of the Footboard; a year later, its name is changed to the present.

1864
02 July
President Abraham Lincoln signs the Congressional Act which gives federal charter rights to a newly formed Northern Pacific Railroad Company. Through its charter, the Northern Pacific receives the title to every odd-numbered section of land in a belt twenty miles wide on both sides of its main line. (Brainerd 1871-1946, Carl Zapffe, Colwell Press, Incorporated, Minneapolis, Minnesota: 1946; pp. 2 & 24)

02 December
The Northern Pacific company organized. Josiah Perham is elected president and Charles S. Perham is elected secretary; they serve until January 5, 1866.

1865
Perham attempts to finance construction of the Northern Pacific road through the sale of capital stock prove futile.

1866
05 January
John Gregory Smith is elected president of the Northern Pacific; he serves until October 1, 1872.

April-July
The N. P. is unsuccessful in its attempts to obtain a congressional subsidy for the construction of the railroad.

07 May
Congress grants the N. P. a two-year extension of the deadline for beginning construction of the road.

1867
The Northern Pacific board of directors continues its attempts to arrange satisfactory financing and commissions Edwin F. Johnson to undertake preliminary surveys and suggest potential routes for the road.

SEE: 05 October 1878

1868
February
The N. P. is unsuccessful in further attempts to secure government subsidy.

01 July
Congress grants a second two-year extension of the deadline for beginning construction of the N. P. road.

1869
01 March
A joint congressional resolution allows the N. P. to issue bonds secured by a mortgage on the railroad and the telegraph line to finance construction of the road.

April
A report on the preliminary N. P. surveys is prepared.

20 May
A preliminary arrangement is made by which Jay Cooke & Company agrees to assume financial management of the N. P.

Jay Cooke, born in Sandusky, Ohio in 1821, died 08 February 1905 in Philadelphia, Pennsylvania, was an American financier, whose firm raised more than $1 billion in loans from the federal government during the American Civil War. After the war Cooke undertook to raise $100 million for the projected route of the Northern Pacific Railroad from Duluth, Minnesota, to Tacoma, Washington. Cooke became head of the Northern Pacific Railroad in 1868 and served until 1873. However, the financial burden was too great, and the firm went bankrupt, thus precipitating the panic of 1873, which brought rail building to a standstill until 1879. Cooke's firm never reopened, but Cooke, through mining investments, repaid his creditors and accumulated another fortune within seven years.

June

In June of 1869, Jay Cooke & Company hires William Milnor Roberts, Chief Engineer of the NP 1870-1879, to conduct a survey of the route for the Northern Pacific Railroad, ca. 1860’s.
Source: Montana State University Library
Jay Cooke & Company commissions W. Milnor Roberts to conduct additional surveys of the NP route. Samuel Wilkeson accompanies expedition; he writes a promotional pamphlet.

SEE: 09 March 1870
SEE: 06 July 1872
SEE: 09 October 1875
SEE: 11 November 1876
SEE: 09 December 1876
SEE: 23 April 1881
SEE: 31 December 1882


17 June

THE NORTHERN PACIFIC RAILROAD.
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From the St. Paul Press, 17th:
From private advices received by telegraph and letter within a few days by Hon. Wm. Windom, one of the Directors of the Northern Pacific Railroad Company, from its President, we are permitted to take some further particulars regarding the recently matured arrangements and plans of the Company. A meeting of the Directors of the Company was held last week at the Fifth Avenue Hotel in New York City, where a very full representation was present, which ratified the contract with Jay Cooke & Co., and also passed a resolution instructing the executive committee to proceed with surveys, commencing at the most easterly terminus of the line, and locate the road to its point of junction with the Lake Superior and Mississippi Railroad, with a view to retire the lands east of that point from market and to locate the road west from that point for construction on such line as is thought best. Preliminary to the engineers’ surveys, arrangements have been made for an official reconnaissance or exploration of the route from Lake Superior to the Pacific Coast in two or three separate expeditions.
Jay Cooke & Co. have sent out one party to the Pacific coast, to commence their explorations at the Pacific termini of the road, and follow its proposed route eastward across the continent. This party left New York on the 18th inst. Mr. Canfield, who left New York on Monday last, is to take charge of the expedition. From Portland, Oregon, the expedition is to go to Puget’s Sound, take the steamer at Olympia, and coast up to Bellingham Bay, visiting points of interest and returning to Olympia. Thence the party will strike across to the Columbia river, which they will ascend to Pend Oreille Lake thence they will march to Fort Benton whence they will take a steamer to Sioux City and thence return to New York by rail. This route, of course, follows the projected line of the Northern Pacific. It will carry the explorers through some of the most magnificent scenery on the continent, and enable them to verify the testimony of previous explorers regarding the favorable topographical and hydrographical features of the route, and its capacity for sustaining a dense agricultural as well as mining population. The directors also propose to start, on the eastern end of the line, another expedition, consisting of the President, Mr. Smith; the chief Engineer, Mr. Johnson; Judge Rice, and perhaps one or two others, accompanied by one or more representatives of Jay Cooke & Co. The party are now arranging for a military escort to protect them from the Red River to the Great Bend of the Missouri. Mr. Smith, Judge Rice, and Mr. Johnson will probably reach St. Paul next week, whence they are going to Lake Superior to make the necessary examinations at Superior City and Duluth, and thence to Bayfield and Montreal River, where they propose to start their engineers to survey and locate the line from there to the junction with the [Lake] Superior and Mississippi Railroad. This accomplished, the party will return to St. Paul, where they will expect by that time to meet the Jay Cooke party and proceed with them by way of St. Cloud to the Red River. At that point the parties will separate, Cooke party going on to the Missouri River and the Directors down the Red River to Georgetown, and possibly to Pembina whence they will return home. Mr. Windom, the resident Director, is making arrangements to provide this expedition with transportation, outfit, &c., from St. Cloud. He and Gov. Marshall have both been earnestly invited to accompany the expedition.
Jay Cooke has taken hold of his enterprise with great ardor and full faith in its success. He is prepared immediately on the return of his party from their formal examination of the route, to put on a heavy force and commence the work of construction. We infer that the work will commence at the point of junction with the Superior road.
From gentlemen who have recently conversed with Mr. Windom, who is thoroughly in the confidence of the Company, and is understood to have been assigned a leading position in the enterprise, we learn that all advices from the Directors are full of enthusiastic confidence in the complete success of the arrangements which have been made for the speedy construction of the road through to the Pacific Coast. (St. Cloud Journal, 24 June 1869, p. 1, c. 7)

15 July

THE NORTHERN PACIFIC RAILROAD.
_____


In another column may be found a full report of the reception of the exploring party at this place, with the toasts, speeches, and so forth. The prospects for the early building of this road never appeared more favorable. The party go out in high hopes of finding their most sanguine anticipations fully realized. The speech of President Smith was no less positive than was expected from the restraint imposed upon him by his official position. The others spoke without hesitation. “The road must and will be built,” was the universal sentiment.
As additional to the speeches of others, we believe we violate no confidence in giving the substance of a conversation with Judge Woodbridge, of Vermont, one of the directors of the Northern Pacific, which occurred while he was riding through and seeing the town. Parties interested in the Central and Union lines, he said, had represented to Eastern capitalists that the route of the Northern Pacific was through a barren and untillable country. The purpose of this trip was to demonstrate the contrary to be the fact. Of the result of their examination he had, from his observation thus far and from what he had learned, no doubt. “The Northern Pacific will be built. It will be built from Lake Superior to St. Cloud sooner than you think for. If this report be favorable, as we expect it will be, men will be put on the work at the earliest possible day next season. This is the great national highway across the continent, as any man can plainly see.”
The party were all highly pleased with our young city, and there is no doubt but that it will be the crossing point for the road. (St. Cloud Journal, 15 July 1869, p. 2, c. 1)

NORTHERN PACIFIC
RAILROAD.
_____

ARRIVAL OF THE EX-
PLORATION PARTY
_____

WITH AN EXCURSION.
_____

RECEPTION at ST. CLOUD
_____

Drive Around the Town.
_____

DINNER AT THE CENTRAL HOUSE.
_____

Toasts and Speeches.
_____


On Friday forenoon, the joint committee of the City Council and Board of Trade, consisting of Mayor Taylor, Alds. Burbank, Kerr, Evans and Clark, and Hon. C. F. Davis, Hon. Wm. S. Moore, Judge Hamlin, T. C. McClure and N. P. Clarke, together with a number of our citizens, crossed over to the depot with carriages to meet and convey to the city the Northern Pacific Railroad excursion expected to arrive on a special train. They were accompanied by the Silver Cornet Band. At 11:15 the shriek of the whistle was followed by the rush of the train up to the depot, and this by the general unloading of the party on board. Amid hand shakings and assurances of welcome, and while the band was discoursing enlivening music, the visitors were conducted to the carriages and taken to the Central House.
The party consisted of the following gentlemen:
Hon. J. Gregory Smith, President of the Northern Pacific Railroad, Vermont.
Hon. R. D. Rice, Director Northern Pacific, Maine.
Hon. B. Smith, M. C., Vermont.
Hon. F. Woodbridge, ex-M. C., Vermont.
Rev. Dr. W. H. Lord, Vermont.
Dr. S. W. Thayer, Vermont.
C. C. Coffin (Carleton of the Boston Journal,) Boston.
E. F. Johnson, Chief Engineer of the Northern Pacific, Conn.
A. B. Bayliss, New York.
Mr. Holmes, agent of Jay Cooke & Co., New York.
Jas. Stinson, Chicago.
Jas. Colborn, Maine.
(The above comprise the exploring party.)
Hon. Wm. Windom, Winona.
W. L. Banning, President of the Lake Superior and Mississippi Railway Company.
E. F. Drake, President of the St. Paul and Sioux City Railroad.
Dr. J. H. Stewart, Postmaster of St. Paul.
Ossian E. Dodge, Secretary St. Paul Chamber of Commerce.
J. W. Taylor, correspondent of the Chicago Tribune.
Gov. Wm. R. Marshall.
Geo. L. Becker, President of the St. Paul and Pacific Railroad.
J. W. Bass.
J. C. Burbank, President St. Paul Chamber of Commerce.
Hermann Trott, Treasurer of the St. Paul and Pacific.
F. R. Delano, Superintendent of the St. Paul and Pacific.
Mr. Moore, of the Milwaukee Wisconsin.
Clark W. Thompson, Superintendent of the Southern Minnesota Railroad.
Col. DeGraff.
Col. Wm. Crooks.
N. P. Lanford, of Montana.
Dorillus Morrison, Mayor of Minneapolis.
W. G. King, Postmaster House of Representatives.
C. D. Davidson, Surveyor General of Minnesota.
Col. E. A. Calins, editor Pioneer.
H. P. Hall, editor Dispatch.
Col. J. H Davidson, of the Press.
Alex. Johnson, of the Pioneer.
Col. Shaw, editor Minneapolis Tribune.
Col. Geo. A. Brackett, Superintendent of Transportation.
C. H. Petit, Daniel Bassett, John H. Thompson, W. S. Judd, Henry T. Welles,
W. F. Cahill, and Richard Chute, of Minneapolis.
Pierre Bottineau, guide of the expedition.
Quite a number of the party, especially those comprising the exploring expedition, re-entered carriages and were shown about the city, with which they all expressed themselves highly pleased. The beauty of the location, the substantial growth of the town, and the many evidences of enterprise to be seen, were frequently remarked.
Soon after two o’clock all reported at the Central House, and the dining hall doors were thrown open, and the guests and a number of citizens seated at the bountifully laden and handsomely decorated tables. It is due to Mr. Hayward to say that his dinner was an excellent one—a dinner not often equaled on the short notice he had—but about twenty-four hours. The bill of fare included:

SOUP.
Oyster.

MEATS.
Roast Turkey, roast lamb, stewed chicken, roast beef, roast veal, chicken pie.

VEGETABLES.
Green peas, potatoes, lettuce, radishes, tomatoes.

PASTRY.
Strawberry pie, rhubarb pie, cocoanut pie, currant pie.

DESSERT.
Boston pudding, congress pudding, fruit cake, marble cake, jelly cake, sponge cake, lemon ice cream, vanilla ice cream, strawberries and cream, almonds, filberts, raisins, apples.

WINES.
Green seal champagne, Mound vineyard champagne, Golden Wedding.


After ample justice had been done to the tempting fare so bountifully provided, and the corks had commenced popping from the champagne bottles, Mayor Taylor rose and briefly welcomed those who were that day the guests of the city:
GENTLEMEN.—It is with sincere pleasure that in behalf of our citizens, I welcome you to St. Cloud. We welcome you as the friends of a great enterprise, to the success of which you have by your zealous and able efforts so materially contributed. We, in common with the great Northwest, have a vital interest in the accomplishment of the undertaking you have so well begun. We greet you, ‘tis true, almost upon the confines of civilization, yet beyond us lies an empire rich above comparison in all those elements which developed, constitute the wealth of nations, awaiting only the magic band—the iron rail—to become subservient to the the interests and welfare of mankind. We hail your coming as a bright day for us, and trust the time is not long hence when we shall again meet you here, at the midway station between the two oceans upon the completed Northern Pacific R. R.
I now propose this sentiment:
THE NORTHERN PACIFIC RAILROAD.—The great want of the nation: to be the commercial highway of the world.
In response to loud and repeated calls, Gov. Smith, President of the North Pacific, said:
MR. MAYOR AND GENTLEMEN.—I have read that Minnesota gave a large majority for Gen. Grant. You will remember the notable words of your chieftain: “Let us have peace.” These memorable words, to my mind, have a general significance. While bearing peaceful sentiments to our brethren at the South, they embody a spirit becoming universal, and one applicable on an occasion such as this. He had hoped for a reception where no speeches would be expected. He was taken by surprise, and was unprepared to make any formal speech. What could be expected of a man tongue-tied? But from my stay in Minnesota I know what its people desire, and I wish from the bottom of my heart that that I had it in my power to meet this desire and say that the Northern Pacific Railroad was an assured fact—that I could have come today with laborers to commence immediate work. We feel encouraged and gratified by the welcome reception given us—for we have passed through dark days with this railroad—and regret that though the enterprise was ably sustained by the Minnesota Representative in Congress, the government declined to give the aid desired. But the sentiment has steadily grown up throughout the East that this road is a fixed fact, and that government aid should be furnished. This much has been gained. Congress says we must wait—that we have a munificent land grant and must rely upon that. We believe there is enough value there to build this road; that the broad acres between here and the end of the road would give all that was required; but the difficulty is to make Eastern capitalists see this. It is hard to make them understand the isothermal line. It is hard to make them believe the mountain passes are crossable, and that the great desert below does not overlap our line. Had Congress given a moderate aid, we might have had capital enough to insure success.
The object of our mission now is to examine and see what we have. It has been said we have values there, and we believe it; but when asked, “do you know it,” we cannot say we have seen the lands. We have to deal with that slow, hesitating, timorous element in all great enterprises—capital. While we have the belief that we can see the day when we will commence the work, yet I do not feel as though I can assure the people of St. Cloud of any certainty. Everything depends on the recommendations which can be made after this trip.
W. J. Parsons, Esq., said:
MR. MAYOR AND GENTLEMEN.—The remarks of His Excellency, the late Governor of the Green Mountain State—that State which, for more than three-quarters of a century, has been sending forth its giants, both intellectual and physical, as representatives of its ability—are suggestive of the fact that we have met here today on an occasion freighted with consideration of vast importance; of vast importance not only to our honored guests and to ourselves, but the country at large.
Mr. Mayor and Gentlemen: The enterprise, and capital and statesmanship of the East, meet here, on the banks of the Father of Waters, with the enterprise, capital and statesmanship of Minnesota. The capital of the East is money. The capital of the West, of Minnesota, is land.
We are here today, Mr. Mayor, to welcome the capital of the East to the hospitalities of the granary of the West—to the kindliest hospitalities of the great wheat growing State of Minnesota; and we are especially proud to entertain among you, gentlemen, one of the farmer statesmen of Minnesota, one whose sagacity as a statesman and political economist—whose bravery as a soldier—not only our young city, but the whole Commonwealth, have always delighted to honor. I give you, then, Mr. Mayor and Gentlemen—
WM. R. MARSHALL.—The brave soldier, the sagacious statesman, the Farmer Governor of the greatest wheat-growing State in the American Union.
Gov. Marshall being enthusiastically called for, said in response:
MR. MAYOR.—I gratefully acknowledge the compliment with which the speaker has honored me in naming me in this connection. I rejoice with you and the citizens of St. Cloud in the advent of these gentlemen representing the Northern Pacific Railroad. I realize the special interest you have felt in this enterprise, and I rejoice in the favorable auguries. I have endeavored in some humble degree to aid and encourage this great undertaking. When called by your suffrages and the suffrages of my fellow citizens in other portions of the State to preside over the destinies of Minnnesota, in casting about to discover the most important interest I could subserve, I recognized in the Northern Pacific Railroad one of the highest importance to our State and the Northwest. It would do much not only to develop Minnesota, but to open up that vast area to the west in the United States, and in that country which soon will be a part of us. I believed I could do no more eminent service to the people of Minnesota than to forward this great enterprise, and have recommended it in my annual messages. While I regret that Congress has not appreciated the importance of this work in a national point of view, and has not aided it, I rejoice that in the absence of that aid which I have labored for, this enterprise is impressing the capitalists of the East with that confidence which will lead them to take hold and push it forward to completion. I believe this visit by our friends will so verify what we have said of this country that they will go back and so represent it to those capitalists that they will at once advance means, and that within the next twelve months we shall see a beginning on the road.
Hon. C. A. Gilman offered a toast, prefaced as follows:
MR. MAYOR AND GENTLEMEN.—I realize that I can say nothing on this occasion that can interest you, notwithstanding the deep interest I feel, in common with all our citizens, in the great enterprise with which our distinguished visitors are connected. And while we are all pleased to meet with and to entertain them, and to take any action that could possible facilitate the building of the Northern Pacific Railroad, I am aware that nothing can be said here than can have an influence in the matter. The leading men of the enterprise are here upon the ground to see and judge for themselves, and I feel that we can safely afford to abide their decision. I beg leave to offer the following toast:
THE REPRESENTATIVES OF MINNESOTA IN CONGRESS, PAST AND PRESENT.—The zeal and faithfulness with which they have so successfully labored to promote our interests, especially in all matters pertaining to the early construction of the Northern Pacific railroad, are duly appreciated by the people of Northern Minnesota.
Hon. Wm. Windom, late Member of Congress from the First district and one of the Directors of the Northern Pacific Company, was called upon, and said:
MR. MAYOR AND GENTLEMEN.—Our friends who have spoken on this subject are like a judge I once read of, who determined to be so just that he leaned the other way. They have not said enough. I would assure you of more. I would say that this road will be built. With a land grant of forty sections per mile the Northern Pacific Railroad must be built within ten years, and I believe that within five years we can go from here to Puget Sound in a railroad car. He referred to the early days of Minnesota when railroads were built with land grants of only six to ten sections per mile. This was all done amid a terrible financial crisis, the Sioux war, and the Rebellion. When with these small grants Minnesota has been literally gridironed with railroads, the forty sections to the mile grant of the Northern Pacific and the character of the men who have hold of it assure us that the thing will be done. I have no more faith than they have, but I am less backward in saying what I think. I am glad we have met you here, and feel happy over the prospects. If we have the lands we believe we have, this road will be built, and within a reasonable length of time. The road itself will pay. Montana has now a population of 60,000 people, gone there in a few years, making the long journey in wagons. When we built railroads in Minnesota we started out for no place in particular. When we build the Northern Pacific we will strike for Montana with its gold mines. The business of that Territory alone will pay a good percentage on the construction of the road. The speaker referred to the wealth of Idaho, which would be tributary, and to the commerce of China, Japan and the Indies, seeking a transit by this, the shortest route. With such a country, such a land grant and such men, the road must be built. It is a National matter which the government must appreciate. There can be no such word as fail. I am happy to be able today to take the first dinner on the Northern Pacific Railroad. And I will say, before closing, that St. Cloud has demonstrated her capacity to be the base of supplies.
The speaker was interrupted by frequent bursts of applause, and as he sat down was greeted with rounds of cheers.
Hon. E. O. Hamlin said:
MR. PRESIDENT AND GENTLEMEN.—There are some of us here present, who have spent many years on this frontier feeding upon the insubstantial diet of hope. I remember very well when the weekly mail was our only regular method of communication with the outside world. I shall never forget how the most urgent business was suspended, and all alike put aside for the present the most pressing engagements to read the letters and news which that mail brought. It was a glad day for us when we exchanged the weekly for the daily mail, and the stage coach of the latter for the lumber wagon of the other. There are few of our citizens here present who do not remember the weary day’s ride from St. Cloud to St. Paul—from four in the morning until dark in the evening, with the breakfast at Clearwater and the supper at Minneapolis. But though poor in those days in external surroundings, we were rich in hope. We fondly believed we should have seen many railroads ere this, and each man was sure they would run into his town! But that Time, which sometimes slowly but always surely changes all things in this world of has brought us the iron rails, and the little wires with their news from over the sea. To those of you, Gentlemen, who are our guests today, accustomed to the refinements of Eastern life, it may seem that our present position is merely a favorable standpoint for hope; but I never take my seat in the cars upon the other side of the river that my memory does not go back to those old days of privation and hardship and isolation from the world, and that I do not feel my heart swell with thankfulness at the change. And here today—although I yield to no man in sympathy with the great enterprise you have in hand; although I yield to no man in glad welcome to these honored gentlemen who represent this magnificent undertaking of binding together with the iron highway of commerce the waters of our own Superior with those of the broad Pacific; although I yield to no man in appreciation of its grandeur and desire for its fulfillment—my memory yet turns to the first real brightness which illumined the darkness of our isolation, and I offer you a sentiment consonant with these feelings, and I believe acceptable to us all:
THE ST. PAUL AND PACIFIC RAILROAD.—The first-born child of our hopes; it will ever have the elder child’s place in our memory.
This and the calls of the company brought forth Hon. Geo. L. Becker, President of the Road, who said:
MR. MAYOR.—I desire to return thanks to Judge Hamlin for the handsome manner in which he has referred to the road with which I am connected. I have long known him as an able lawyer and jurist, but never supposed he had so vivid an imagination. I would recommend him to the Ledger as a first-class romance writer. I endorse all that Mr. Windom has said on the North Pacific and the necessity for its early construction. The St. Paul and Pacific R. R. is already pointed toward the Pacific coast, and all that can stop it when it gets to the Red River will be to see a good commencement on the Northern Pacific. That road must be built. It is the great natural highway across the continent. It has advantages possessed by no other route. All I can say to Gov. Smith is, that he had better commence his enterprise right away.
F. R. Delano, the Superintendent of the Road, being called for made a humorous speech, in which, with many good hits, he informed Gov. Smith that if he did not build a railroad to the Pacific the St. P. & P. R. R. would go there, sure. A railroad must be built to give to the people of the old world the grain surplus of Minnesota, which will soon be almost enough of itself to feed those countries.
Col. Chas. D. Kerr offered the following:
MR. MAYOR.—I rise to propose an old, old toast—and yet one that never diminishes in interest and force as the years go by—and the more interesting to us today because there is present with us in the flesh a distinguished name that we have long and intimately known in the spirit, as both closely connected with our toast and with this great enterprise we have met here to celebrate:—our old friend “Carleton,” of the Boston Journal. “Our old friend,” I say, and yet Mr. Coffin who represents him here in the body, is a comparative stranger to us all; he has been introduced only today. What an iconoclast is this ceremony of introduction! How it breaks old and cherished images! I would that we could always know him as “Carleton,” and he will let us call him so today and linger, with grateful memories, on a name that has for many years been so intimately associated with the extreme advance of civilization and reform. But I had almost forgotten my toast:
THE NEWSPAPER PRESS OF OUR LAND.—More a power today than ever; may its influence never be less, and its efforts be never misapplied.
Mr. Coffin thus called upon, replied:
MR. MAYOR AND GENTLEMEN.—I know that all of you have read the fascinating story of Aladdin and his wonderful lamp—how that by merely rubbing the lamp and wishing anything he desired would come. With us that wish would be, the completion of the Northern Pacific Railroad. I know this, the North Pacific is going to be built. I do not base this, as Mr. Windom, does, on he energy of the men in charge of the work; but when the Almighty laid out this great country—the lakes and and oceans—he marked out this line as the great highway of the world. It is just as sure that the Northern Pacific Railroad is to go from Lake Superior to Puget Sound as that the sun is to rise tomorrow. If not done by the present Company, it will be by some other. He referred to his late trip to the other side of the world, and to the great changes which the completion of this road would work there. The time is not far distant when the people of St. Cloud will start with their carpetbags in their hands and go to China—leaving home July 1st and reaching their destination by August 1st. Not only will you go to China, but China will come to you. They are the men who are to help build the Northern Pacific—to do the heavy work. They were successfully employed on the Central Pacific. Our great nation is to work out the mighty problem of the age—the equality of all men under the sun—and this road is to be one of the means. Our country will reach out her left hand to those old nations as she now does her right. We are to vitalize them with our energy. Our destiny is to give christian civilization to the people of those old countries beyond the seas. Gov. Smith is actuated by as high a spirit of enthusiasm as you are, but he hesitates in giving expression to it. This work demands aid from Congress to carry it through immediately, and in three years the locomotive ought to be running from Lake Superior to Puget Sound.
Loud calls being made for Ossian E. Dodge, the famous maker of machine poetry and singer, he came to time in a string of verses, every one of which contained a complete pun or unmistakable point, which sent the company off in a roar. Dodge is certainly a genius; he can give in one verse the pith of an hours’ speech. He is averse (no pun here) to having his effusions published, and with difficulty we succeeded in obtaining his toast at the close, penciled just as he was called to his feet, (and only then by promising to state that it was written by A. J., the Incendiary:)

“And now, that I may not be tedious and long,
I’ll give you a toast, right here in my song—
Let everyone join me, both cheerful and loud—
The Northern Railroad, starting here from St. Cloud!”

At half past four o’clock, the dinner being over, the company passed out, the exploring party preparing to start on their long journey, and the other to return to St. Paul and Minneapolis. The latter were taken to the depot in carriages, and the special train puffed away from the station at five o’clock, its occupants shouting back their good wishes.

Expedition to locate the route of the Northern Pacific, 1869.
Source: Minnesota Historical Society
The exploring party took the opposite direction about the same time, going some three miles that evening, and camping near Sauk River. The outfit consists of ten double wagons and twenty-six splendid horses. There are four two-seated passenger spring wagons, two mess wagons, four baggage and supply wagons, and six saddle horses. In addition, two span of horses and a pair of mules were purchased in this city.
The camp equipage consists of two large hospital tents, and eight wall tents, with cots, mattresses, and other necessary conveniences for camping out.
The commissary stores have been selected with great care, and consist of everything that will be needed on a trip of the kind, and are of sufficient quantity to last sixty or seventy days.
Two good cooks and all other necessary attendants will accompany the expedition. A good supply of guns, ammunition, and fishing tackle has been provided, so that the party will have facilities for rare sport in hunting and fishing while making their long trip across the country.
Gov. Marshall accompanies the party a portion of the way. Hon. E. M. Wilson, member of Congress from this District, arrived in town on Saturday and goes as far as Fort Wadsworth with them. On Tuesday Mayor Taylor and Mr. T. C. McClure started to overtake and join the party. Gen. Levi Nutting, of St. Paul, came up last night and started this morning to overtake them.
A small party, consisting of Rev. E. S. Williams and wife, and Miss Clara Wheaton, of Northfield, and Rev. A. S. Fuller and wife, of Rochester, were also a part of the train. They intend to accompany the exploring expedition as far as the Red River and perhaps farther, having provided their own outfit, but will travel under the protection of the expedition.
We learn the intentions of the expedition are, that from Pembina Gov. Smith and his party will return here, and thence go to Lake Superior. The representative of Jay Cooke & Co., Mr. Holmes, and his party will continue on across the country from Pembina to the great bend of the Missouri, and if weather and the trip are pleasant, may return over the same route, or they may take a boat and descent the Missouri, returning here by water and rail. The journey will probably occupy some two months.
The occasion was throughout a pleasant one. The day was bright; the dinner was No. 1; the guests were pleased with the town and the people; the band furnished good music; and everything passed off in the best style. The exploration party left with the hearty good wishes of the people of St. Cloud, who hope at no distant day to give them another reception when they shall come from Lake Superior to St. Cloud by rail. (St. Cloud Journal, 15 July 1869, p. 2, c.’s 2-5)

NOTE: St. Cloud entertained high hopes of becoming the chosen point for the crossing of the Mississippi River by the Northern Pacific Railroad.

22 July
NORTHERN PACIFIC PARTY.—Mr. Beal’s artist, at Minneapolis, has returned from the Northern Pacific Exploring party. He left them at Glenwood on Friday evening. They were getting along finely, and everywhere along their route had been treated with the utmost hospitality by the citizens. They are delighted with the country and much pleased with the prospects for the route of the great Northern Pacific road. The artist brought back a lot of negatives of fine views of the country along the route, copies of which will be sent to Jay Cooke & Co., New York. (St. Cloud Journal, 22 July 1869, p. 2, c. 5)

09 December

THE NORTHERN PACIFIC RAILROAD
_____

A History of the Enterprise—Its Present
Condition and Future Prospects.
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Correspondence of the Boston Journal.
During the last few weeks I have received many letters from persons in different parts of the country, making inquiries in regard to the Northern Pacific railroad—what the prospects are in regard to its construction, what the present and what the prospective condition of the enterprise is.
As it is a project in which the people of the Eastern States have ever felt a lively interest, it will be my aim in this connection to answer the above inquiries.
A route to the Pacific by the Northern line was surveyed when Franklin Pierce was President, and Jefferson Davis Secretary of War. Isaac I. Stevens was the Governor of Washington Territory, and was put in charge of the survey.
President Pierce has just been borne to his final resting place. Jeff. Davis is still alive, bearing a burden which can never be laid aside, which he must carry through life. Gov. Stevens, alone, of the three, is gratefully held in remembrance by his countrymen.
The unscrupulousness of Davis in public affairs was manifest to those who knew him best long before the rebellion was inaugurated. When Gov. Stevens made his report, the superiority of the route over the Central and Southern lines was at once apparent, especially in the amount of arable land, and Davis, with his own hand, without any warrant for so doing, falsified the report of Gov. Stevens!
Nothing was done toward constructing a railroad to the Pacific till after the breaking out of the war, when the Central Pacific was chartered, followed by the Union Pacific both of which had liberal land grants and were aided by the issue of land grants and bonds, as everybody knows.
In 1864 the Northern Pacific Company was organized, the prime mover of the enterprise being Mr. Perham, who conceived the idea of making it “the people’s road,” the stock to be held in small amounts, and everybody taking a little. He went to Washington, laid the project before Congress, and obtained a land grant, and there the matter dropped.
Mr. Perham labored hard to get the public interested, borrowed money of everybody who would lend, got into debt, became discouraged, and finally found parties who were willing to take the franchise and pay some of his debts. Extravagant reports were circulated at the time in regard to the amount of money he had received. He was reported a wealthy man, but the amount did not cover his indebtedness, and he died soon after in poverty.
The new holders of the franchise were men from different parts of the country but one after another dropped off when they came to see the magnitude of the undertaking and the difficulties in the way of construction—not physical, but financial obstacles.
The children of Israel three thousand years ago found it hard work to make bricks without straw, and the gentlemen connected with the enterprise found that thirty centuries had not modified the fact.
It was found that the public was not ready to invest in an enterprise where there was no guarantee of interest by Government. The Government itself offered the very best securities; the Central and Union Pacific bonds were good, and so all the floating capital of the country was absorbed. For these reasons, one after another, although fully convinced of the feasibility of the route, and of the inestimable value of the road to the country when completed, gave up their connection with the project and turned their attention to other things.
Those who remained went before Congress and asked for the issue of bonds in aid of the enterprise, but they encountered opposition and the request was denied. Surveying parties meanwhile were sent into the field. Two routes were surveyed from Lake Superior to the Mississippi, and one from Puget Sound to the Columbia—at an immense outlay of money. A second attempt was made to obtain Government aid after the completion of the survey, and a bill was reported in which aid was granted to the Northern and also to the Southern Pacific road, but no action was taken upon it. It fell to the ground of its own weight, and through the opposition of other roads.
Each alternate section of land, on both sides of the road, for twenty miles, is granted to the Company, making a total grant of about forty-seven million acres. The Company cannot receive any land till twenty-five miles of the road is constructed.
Forty-seven million acres seems a large amount of land to be granted to one corporation, and it is; but this amount failed to enlist capitalists in the enterprise. They could do better with their money. The estimated cost of the road is between $80,000,000 and $100,000,000, and the land must be sold at $2 per acre on the average, to obtain the requisite amount of money. The inducement was not very great for the general public to take stock in such an enterprise, for the sale of land must necessarily be slow with all the Government lands, the alternate sections, in the market at the same time. If the great capitalists of the country could not be induced to take hold of it, there was no probability that the farmers, mechanics and those who had accumulated small savings would invest. The friends of the enterprise therefore waited for a more favorable state of affairs, but meanwhile enlisted some of the ablest railroad men of the country.
The President of the Company is J. Gregory Smith, of St. Albans, Vt., President of the Vermont Central and Vermont and Canada roads. Associated with him are Hon. R. D. Rice of Augusta, Me., President of the Kennebec and Portland railroad; J. Edgar Thompson, of the Pennsylvania Central; Messrs. Wells, Fargo & Co.; Mr. George W. Cass, of Pittsburgh, Fort Wayne and Chicago; Thomas H. Canfield, of Burlington Vt.; Mr. Jay Cooke, of Philadelphia; Mr. Stinson, of Chicago, and other gentlemen identified with the railroad interests of the country. An arrangement was made some months ago with Mr. Cooke whereby he was appointed the financial agent of the Company. But that gentleman, before fully accepting the position, wished to have a report from his own agents and engineers in regard to the feasibility of the line and the features of the country between Lake Superior and Puget Sound, in order that he might act understandingly, and go before the capitalists of the country with such evidence as would convince them of the high character of the enterprise for the carrying out of which he might solicit their aid.
To accomplish this, two exploring parties were organized last summer, one to examine the country from Lake Superior westward, the other to commence at Puget Sound and examine the country eastward to the headwaters of the Missouri. Having received a cordial invitation to spend my summer vacation with the Lake Superior party, I gladly accepted it, and shall long have a lively recollection of our first thunder storm, of our jolly times while toasting salt pork and pulling big logs into camp. One portion of our party, consisting of Messrs. Holmes and Bayless, of New York, explored the region between the Red River of the North and the Missouri. The party starting from Puget Sound, traversed the Rocky Mountain region, visited the various passes in that range, and explored the country around the headwaters of the Yellowstone. The entire line has been thoroughly examined during the past season, and the gentlemen sent out by Mr. Cooke are now making up their reports. They were civil engineers, eminent in their profession, and their reports will be accepted as authoritative. It is presumed that they will be given to the public in due time, and all who are interested in this great international highway will be able to judge of its feasibility and prospective value.
The charter of the Company permits the building of a road from Lake Superior to Puget Sound, with a branch down to Columbia. The Company may start at any point on the lake in Wisconsin or Minnesota. There are only three ports in those States—Bayfield, Superior and Duluth. Duluth can hardly be called a port at present, inasmuch as the harbor is not yet constructed, but assuming that it will be, these are the three points from which may be selected the eastern terminus. It is quite probable, however, that all three will share the advantages of a connection with the line.
A surveying party is now in the field, or rather in the woods, between the lake and the Mississippi, endeavoring to determine the best route westward from the lake. The line undoubtedly will touch the Missouri near the mouth of the Yellowstone, as it will pass up the valley of that stream. The country between the lake and the Red River of the North is very level. Beyond that stream it is most of the way a rolling prairie, with timber along the streams and coal deposits cropping out from the bluffs.
The line, entering the rich valley of the Yellowstone, will pass through a magnificent region—the summer pasturage of the buffalo. While at St. Paul recently we met Gen. Hancock who had returned from a visit to Montana. He spoke of that Territory as being the finest region for pasturage he had ever seen. The hills are covered with bunch grass, highly nutritious, upon which buffalo, elk and deer fatten in winter and summer alike. He remarked that when the country becomes settled it will produce mutton of a delicious flavor. The Rocky Mountain sheep and antelope of this region are said to be superior to all others. The line leaves the valley of the Yellowstone and crosses the narrow divide to the head waters of the Missouri through a depression called Bozeman’s Pass, through which an excellent carriage road has already been constructed. It will probably pass through the town of Helena, the present capital of Montana, a place of 10,000 inhabitants. The mines of the vicinity are exceedingly rich, and the surrounding country is developing rapidly. The yield of wheat in Montana the present season was very large; but there is no market for agricultural products, and the people are waiting impatiently for the construction of the Northern Pacific road.
The line will probably cross the Rocky Mountains by the Deer Lodge Pass, where the ascent is so gradual and the dividing ridge so low that a mining company has dug a ditch and taken the water from a stream whose natural flow is into the Missouri, through the pass to their mines upon the western slope! So the Missouri is feeding the Columbia. Mr. Roberts, the engineer making the explorations, declared that it is a clear case of highway robbery! The line follows down the Bitter Root Valley, across the great plain of the Columbia to Walla-Walla, and then crosses the Cascade range to Puget Sound.
There are several remarkable characteristics to be found on this route that distinguish it from the Central and Southern lines. Although four hundred miles north of the Central there is far less snow than on that line, the elevation is not so great by two thousand feet. The assent is a trifle less than 5,000, against 8,280 on the Union Pacific. The line follows the course of streams, except across the level prairie region between Lake Superior and the Missouri. There are only two general summits—that between the Missouri and the Columbia and that between the Columbia and Puget Sound. The gradients will be less on this line than any other across the continent. The highest grade will not exceed 80 feet, while on the Central Pacific there are many miles of 116 feet to the mile. It passes through a country susceptible of settlement the entire distance. There are no alkaline deserts. There is an abundance of timber. The company will have no trouble obtaining the best of ties. Coal abounds. The line passes through the richest mining regions of Montana—now producing more gold than any other State or Territory in the Union. The western terminus will be one of the noblest bays in the world, already the great lumbering center of the Pacific coast. It will traverse a region yet to become the New England of the Pacific coast. It is the shortest possible line across the Continent. It will decrease the distance between New York and Yokohama, or Shanghai, or Canton, by 1,100 miles. If teas and silks and China goods are taken across the Continent, it must be by this route. If English passengers bound for China ever turn their faces westward, they will take this route. The time will come when it will be the highway of the nations. The Columbia and its tributaries will yet furnish water power to numerous manufactories. The whirl of machinery, the ring of the anvil, the humming of saws ere long will resound amid the mighty forests of the western slope. Nature has endowed it with her choicest gifts, a mild climate and a genial sun. The balmy southern winds give to Oregon and Washing the climate of England.
In the coming years a metropolis—the peer of San Francisco—will rise upon the shores of that beautiful bay of the Northwest. Such is the outlook.
The construction of the Northern Pacific railroad will be the beginning of a development of material prosperity throughout all that vast region of the Northwest. I am ignorant of the plans of those engaged in the great enterprise other than this—that it is their determination to begin the construction of the road as soon as possible. They have already been at enormous expense in carrying on their surveys, and are not the men to turn back, having once engaged in such an undertaking. Although unaided by Congress, although an immense amount of money will be needed, they are confident that when the public come to understand the merits of the enterprise they will obtain means to build the road.
CARLETON.
(St. Cloud Journal, 09 December 1869, p. 1, c. 9; p. 4, c.’s 1 & 2)

1870
01 January
The final agreement with Jay Cooke & Co. is signed. Sale of first N. P. mortgage bonds begins.

Loring, Black and Company delivering supplies near Brainerd, 1870.
Source: Minnesota Historical Society
NP Construction Buildings, ca. 1870.
Source: Minnesota Historical Society
The railroad normally employed contractors who traveled with the construction train or, using trails through the woods such as the Leech Lake Trail, met the construction crews along the route to provide food and other supplies. Hunters were hired to provide fresh meat along the route. Much of the needed construction equipment was loaded on the construction train and replenished by rail along the route as track was laid. Workers slept in tents and, if there was room, in the cars of the construction train. Some equipment was hauled in by oxcart, horse and wagon and some equipment and other supplies came by barge or steamboat up the Mississippi to the steamboat and ferry landings.


27 January

THE NORTHERN PACIFIC RAILROAD.
____


As our readers generally are interested in everything that pertains to the construction of this important thoroughfare, we compile everything that has been received by exchanges and by telegraph during the past week:
A Washington correspondent of the St. Paul Pioneer writes: “The Northern Pacific Railroad is requiring some wire pulling. It is asserted that the road will actually be commenced early in March in the vicinity of Dalles, and push west to the Missouri, crossing the Mississippi above Crow Wing, and a branch to run to Minneapolis via St. Cloud; but I won’t vouch for the truth of the rumor, particularly the latter part. No doubt the main line will be commenced early in the spring.” This correspondent states that Hon. H. M [sic]. Rice is in Washington in the interests of the Northern Pacific.

Northern Pacific engineers, left to right: Unknown, Boice, Unknown, Jones, Edwards, Olson, Rolf, General Ira Spaulding, Colonel Owens, Ruggles, McKenzie, ca. 1867.
Source: Minnesota Historical Society
A New York dispatch of the 20th says: “Wall street has been thrown into a state of febrile excitement by the discussions in regard to the bringing out of the Northern Pacific Railroad company’s bonds. The large amount of money required by the Northern Pacific railroad scheme is creating an uneasy feeling among capitalists. The absorption of $100,000,000 to $200,000,000 in another Pacific railroad through about 2,000 miles of a country as yet inhabited only by 5,000 Indians and a few trappers is much discussed in financial circles. The 200 miles in Minnesota, for which wealthy firms have already subscribed, will be a benefit to Minnesota, and probably eventually profitable to the investors, who, being wealthy, can afford to wait until the line reaches a paying point.”
Another dispatch of the same date is valuable chiefly for its remarkable [remarkably incorrect] geographical information: “A report on Wall street says the Northern Pacific railroad propose to use 250 miles of the Lake Superior and Mississippi road, from Duluth north of Crow river, from the wilderness at Otter Tail lake, and reaching the Red River of the North at Fort Abercrombie.”
A dispatch of the 22d states that a meeting of persons interested in the Northern Pacific Railroad was held in New York the previous day, and that the general expression was that the work should be pushed forward vigorously in the spring.
The Minneapolis Tribune says that Major Brackett, of that city, has fitted out four parties for Gen. Ira Spaulding and Col. W. H. Owen, of the N. P. R. R., with the necessary animals and supplies for making new surveys. These parties consist of sixteen men each. One party left St. Cloud yesterday morning, under Mr. C. H. Alsop. They will go above Crow Wing, and run a line toward Lake Superior further north than any yet surveyed. Surveys will be made by the other parties through the same locality, and also from a point on the Lake Superior and Mississippi Railroad easterly through Wisconsin, with a view to an outlet in that direction. (St. Cloud Journal, 27 January 1870, p. 2, c. 1)

14 February

THE NORTHERN PACIFIC.
_____


The Minneapolis Tribune of Tuesday says:

Photo taken in the early spring of 1870, NP surveyors on the east bank of the Mississippi looking east. The photo marks the place where the railroad was to cross the river, 1870. A 791x817 version of this photo is also available for viewing online.
Source: Crow Wing County Historical Society
“Col. Hudcutt’s surveying party left this city yesterday morning for the Dalles of the St. Louis River, where they will be joined by the Colonel in a day or two. They will immediately upon his arrival there proceed to make a survey of a line for the Northern Pacific Railroad from the Dalles to the Red River of the North. Capt. Smith, another engineer of this road, is expected to arrive here tonight. He will organize another party, and start out on the line as soon as all the necessary arrangements can be made.
The following dispatch, sent from Fond du Lac on Tuesday, shows that work has actually begun:
Work on the Northern Pacific Railroad commenced at noon today. A large number of citizens of Duluth assembled, and there was much rejoicing.
Speeches were made by Gen. Spaulding, Chief Engineer, and others.
The Northern Pacific Railroad intersects the Lake Superior and Mississippi Railroad at the Dalles, and then to Duluth.
The wheelbarrow which carried the first load of earth is to be presented to Jay Cooke. (St. Cloud Journal, 17 February 1870, p. 2, c. 6)

15 February
Construction was started on the Northern Pacific Railroad at [Thomson Junction] Carlton, which is twenty miles west of Duluth. (Brainerd 1871-1946, Carl Zapffe, Colwell Press, Incorporated, Minneapolis, Minnesota: 1946, p. 2)

NOTE: It would appear Zapffe is a day late on the beginning of construction.

03 March

NORTHERN PACIFIC RAILROAD.
_____


Further information strengthens what we stated last week: that the main line of the road will cross the Mississippi north of Crow Wing, near the survey described in our local columns, while a branch will be built from St. Cloud to the Red River.

[...]


The Minneapolis Tribune of yesterday says that several hundred tons of supplies will at once be sent to different points along the line of Northern Pacific Railroad operations, for the use of working parties who will commence as soon as the character of the road will permit. (St. Cloud Journal, 03 March 1870, p. 2, c. 2)

09 March

NORTHERN PACIFIC RAILROAD.
_____


A meeting of the stockholders and directors of the Northern Pacific was held in New York on the 9th, at which the following directors were elected to serve for three years:
J. Gregory Smith, R. D. Rice, W. B. Ogden, G. W. Cass, W. G. Fargo, S. M. Fulton, W. Windom, F. H. Canfield, J. Edgar Thompson, B. F. Cheney, Jas. Stinson, F. Billings, C. B. Wright. The first seven are the Executive Committee.
The board organized by electing J. Gregory Smith president, R. D. Rice vice president, A. H. Barney treasurer, and Samuel Wilkeson secretary.
The St. Paul Press publishes a New York special, which states that a contract for negotiating fifty million dollars of Northern Pacific Railroad bonds has been concluded with leading German banking houses. Five hundred thousand dollars are to be advanced immediately under such arrangements. This contract covers the estimated cost of the railway to Puget Sound. This action of course indicates that everything that money can do to push the work forward to completion with the utmost rapidity, will be done.
The Press has an article on the colonization scheme of the Northern Pacific Company, which promises to be one of the grandest enterprises of the age. The Company holds from Congress almost fifty million acres of land, or a territory greater in extent than all New England. They want laborers to prosecute the work of constructing their road, and they want speedy settlement along the line. To accomplish these ends, says the Press:
“They offer in the first place to furnish immigrants for the first year or two abundant labor in the construction of the road itself; and to provide each laborer at the end of, or during his term of service, or any immigrant who does not choose to labor for the company, a farm of 40, 80 or 160 acres selected in alternate blocks, with a neat frame tenement already erected thereon and with a moderate field fenced in at the expense of the company, ‘to have and to hold the same with all appurtences thereunto appertaining,’ as the deed runs, on terms which barely cover the outlay, payment being required in such small installments, running through a long period of years, at a very low rate of interest, as will be no burden to the poorest man in the world.
“With the wages received for labor in the construction of the road they can readily furnish and stock these ready made farms. In other words, they propose to give the laborer at once a home and a productive farm, which, under ordinary circumstances, it costs him years of toil to make, on terms equivalent to a loan of so much capital on his own terms.”
An immense number of tenement houses will be constructed, all after the same pattern, so that they can be taken to any point and put together at once.
The Company has selected three Commissioners to go to Europe for the purpose of presenting these inducements and securing the desired immigration. The gentlemen chosen for this mission are H. Hugh McCulloch, late Secretary of the Treasury; Hon. Carl Shurs, United States Senator from Missouri; Ex-Governor Wm. R. Marshall, of Minnesota. An official exposition of the scheme will soon be published by the Company.
We learn from the Superior Tribune that Gen. Spaulding will at once commence sending out supplies on the contemplated line of road from that quarter sufficient for 1,000 men for seven months. Store houses will be built every five miles, and placed under guard; whilst from Crow Wing and other points, the same plans will be carried out.
The Tribune says it is not improbable that the iron for the Northern Pacific may be manufactured at the head of the lake, as the best iron in the world is found upon the shores of Lake Superior. In connection with that, the St. Paul Dispatch has been informed that the Lake Superior & Mississippi and Northern Pacific Railroad companies have made arrangements to establish large rolling mills at Duluth for the manufacture of railroad iron.
The Minneapolis Tribune says:
Mr. Geo. A. Brackett has received orders to purchase and forward to the line of the Northern Pacific railroad, between the Mississippi and the Red River, several hundred tons more of supplies in addition to the large amount previously ordered. He is now busy in sending them forward from this city via St. Cloud.
The Duluth Minnesotian says:
“We understand Gen. Sargent is quite busy east: we hear of him at Philadelphia and Washington showing up German Bankers. We understand an effort is being made to induce him to go to Europe in the interest of the Northern Pacific Loan—and that he has it under consideration.” (St. Cloud Journal, 17 March 1870, p. 2, c. 3)

SEE: 1869
SEE: 06 July 1872
SEE: 09 October 1875
SEE: 11 November 1876
SEE: 09 December 1876
SEE: 23 April 1881
SEE: 31 December 1882

10 March

NORTHERN PACIFIC RAILROAD.
_____


We are informed by Hon. Wm. Windom that he has received instructions to order four hundred and fifty tons of provisions to be delivered along the line of the Northern Pacific Railroad for two thousand laborers. This is indicative of active operations on that road during the coming season.—[Winona Republican.
Geo. A. Brackett is busy forwarding the supplies for the Northern Pacific Railroad. A large quantity has already been shipped, and the rest will soon be on the way. He has sent a large number of teams to Hinckley, to transport the supplies to the different stations between there and the Mississippi River. Teams have also been sent from St. Cloud to transport supplies to the stations between the Mississippi and the Red River.—[Minneapolis Tribune. (St. Cloud Journal, 10 March 1870, p. 2, c. 2)

NORTHERN PACIFIC RAILROAD SUPPLIES.


About seventy-five tons of supplies for the Northern Pacific Company have been received at this place thus far, and forwarded to Gull Lake Station. Three hundred barrels of flour have also been sent there. Large quantities of flour and general supplies will also be sent to Crow Wing Crossing and Otter Tail, making in all 900 barrels of flour, and 300 tons of miscellaneous supplies. These three stations will be used as depots, from which provisions will be distributed along the line of work. The flour and a portion of the pork are purchased at this place, and all the freight will be sent here for re-shipment. Clarke & Wait attend to the transportation of the goods. (St. Cloud Journal, 10 March 1870, p. 3, c. 1)

31 March
THE St. Paul Press says that Jay Cooke is soon to establish a branch bank in St. Paul, which will be his headquarters for disbursing funds in the construction of the Northern Pacific Railroad. It is estimated that during some portions of the season the payments will amount to one million dollars a week. (St. Cloud Journal, 31 March 1870, p. 2, c. 2)

07 April
N. P.'s executive committee authorizes the purchase of two-thirds of the stock of the St. Paul & Pacific Railroad Company.

13 April

Steamboat Landing located on the west side of the Mississippi River somewhere north of the railroad bridge, ca. 1872.
Source: Minnesota Historical Society
Of great interest and some importance [circa 1870-1877] was Captain George Houghton's steamer Pokegama which made regular trips up the Mississippi to Aitkin and Pokegama, carrying lumbermen's supplies and camp outfits. The windings of the river are well illustrated by the fact that Aitkin is seventy-one miles up the river and only twenty-seven miles away by rail. Naturally, the railroad proved to be an effective competitor, and when the steamer burned a few years later, it was not replaced. (Brainerd’s Half Century, Ingolf Dillan, General Printing Company, Minneapolis, Minnesota: 1923, p. 22)

THE NORTHERN PACIFIC had completed its line from the Twin Cities to Duluth by 1870, and had begun a western extension which was designed to reach the Mississippi far enough north to be of service to the rapidly expanding lumber industry in this region. At least one man saw the opportunity and the need for steamboat transportation north of Sauk Rapids and with characteristic pioneer energy, he proceeded to do something about it. That man was Captain George H. Houghton who had previously been engaged in steam boating on the Minnesota River and who, for more than twenty years to come, was to be so prominently identified with the upper Mississippi that he earned the title of father of navigation on this stretch of river.
In the winter of 1869-70 Captain Houghton built at Sauk Rapids a boat which was launched on April 13, 1870, and christened the Pokegama. It was a stern-wheeler, a hundred feet long, with a twenty-four foot beam and a two foot draft. The Pokegama started its first trip upstream on June 20, reached Crow Wing on June 24, Sandy Lake on June 26, and the foot of Pokegama Falls on June 27. During the rest of the season, it ran from Crow Wing, at that time the most northerly village of any size along the upper river, to Pokegama Falls, making such trips as they were needed.
On one trip it carried supplies for Northern Pacific construction crews, which were then operating in the vicinity of what is now McGregor. This trip took the Pokegama through Sandy Lake, up Sandy River, and into Davis Lake, where the supplies were landed. Persons familiar with this narrow and shallow stream today might be inclined to regard this as a “Believe It or Not” exploit, but the Pokegama was only the first of along line of upper river steamers which could “run on a heavy dew.” With Aitkin as its home port, this vessel continued to supply the logging camps from 1871 to 1877. On November 12, 1877, the Pokegama was destroyed by fire after it had been put up for the winter. (Steamboating on the Mississippi Headwaters, Irving Harlow Hart, Spring 1952, Minnesota Historical Society, pp. 9 & 10)

26 May
THE Northern Pacific railroad has been located as to the Minnesota end, and begins in town 48 in Carlton county and runs from thence due west to the Mississippi river—thence west to the Red River at a point between the Buffalo and Wild Rice rivers. (St. Cloud Journal, 26 May 1870, p. 2, c. 2)

31 May
A joint congressional resolution authorizes N. P. to issue bonds secured by a mortgage on its land grant to finance construction of the road.

09 June

ORIGIN OF THE NORTHERN PACI-
FIC RAILROAD.
_____


A correspondent of the New York Times gives the following account of the projectors of the Northern Pacific Railroad:
Your issue of Saturday presents a letter from your special correspondent regarding the “breaking ground” on the Northern Pacific Railroad, in which letter Mr. Jay Cooke is styled the “Father of the Northern Pacific.” Believing that honor should be given to whom it is due, I beg leave to state the facts. This Company was chartered in 1864, and its immense and valuable grants were donated in that year. Josiah Perham, of Boston, was the moving spirit in the enterprise who, together with Thaddeus Stevens, Hon. George Briggs, member of Congress from New York, Hon. L. D. M. Sweet, of Maine, and a member of Congress from Minnesota, (Hon. Ignatius Donnelly) were instrumental in securing this franchise from the Government. The first organization of the Company included Mr. Perham as President, Hon. Geo. Briggs as Vice President, Israel S. Washington, of Boston, Treasurer, and C. W. S. Rowland as Commissioner. These gentlemen remained in control of the enterprise until January, 1866, when through the instrumentality of Col. Rowland, the control was passed to Hon. John Gregory Smith, of Vermont, who succeeded Mr. Perham as President; Hon. R. D. Rice, of Maine; Onslow Stearns, Governor of New Hampshire; Geo. Stark, of New Hampshire, and several gentlemen of Boston; and not until this year has Mr. Cooke become in any way connected with the Company. The first officers of the Company are all deceased but Colonel Rowland, who resigned his position some time since. That the connection of Mr. Cooke with the management of the Northern Pacific will aid vastly in the speedy construction of the road no one will doubt; but he must not be classed with those who from the beginning were the men, who in the face of great obstacles, successfully gave it birth and vitality. He will, beyond doubt, reap the harvest they sowed, and the nation will be indebted to him as well as to them. (St. Cloud Journal, 09 June 1870, p. 4, c. 1)

20 June
TELEGRAPH EXTENSION.—On Monday O. C. Greene, Esq., Manager of the Northwestern Telegraph Company’s lines north of St. Paul, arrived with a party of a dozen men under charge of R. A. Hankinson, who left immediately for Crow Wing for the purpose of setting the poles and running the wires from this city to Crow Wing, the latter place to be the terminus for the present. The poles are now at Crow Wing and Sauk Rapids, and will be set to this place—the surplus poles being floated down the river—when the party will return, stringing the wire as they go. They will have the line in working order in about four weeks. It will be mainly used by the construction parties about to commence work on the Northern Pacific Railroad, they having a contract with the telegraph company. (St. Cloud Journal, 23 June 1870, p. 3, c. 1)

23 June
THE Company having the contract for building the Minnesota portion of the Northern Pacific Railroad, calls itself the Red River Construction Company, and has its headquarters at Minneapolis. It advertised for proposals for doing the grading, bridging and trestle work, and piling, furnishing ties, &c., at any time after the 25th inst., and the work will be awarded and commenced as fast as the line of the road is located. (St. Cloud Journal, 23 June 1870, p. 2, c. 1)

30 June
THE Northwestern (or N. P. R. R.) Construction Company perfected its organization last week by electing the following officers:
President—Hon. J. L. Merriam, St. Paul.
Vice President—D. C. Shepard, Minneapolis.
General Manager—A. P. Balch, Hanover, New Hampshire.
Treasurer—Hon. D. Morrison, Minneapolis.
Auditing Board—W. D. Washburn, D. C. Shepard, A. R. Payson.
Executive Committee—A. R. Payson, W. D. Washburn, F. E. Canda, W. W. Eastman.
All are practical railroad men. A better man for President than Col. Merriam, could not easily be found. (St. Cloud Journal, 30 June 1870, p. 2, c. 1)

TRAINS are now running on the Mississippi and Lake Superior [Lake Superior and Mississippi] railroad to Thomson, at the Dalles of the St. Louis river, 128 miles from St. Paul. This will be the point of intersection with the Northern Pacific. An excursion party passed over the road as far as Thomson on Tuesday. It is expected that the line will be finished to Lake Superior about the 15th of August. (St. Cloud Journal, 30 June 1870, p. 2, c. 1)

07 July

NORTHERN PACIFIC RAILROAD
MATTERS.
_____


Gen. Spaulding was in the city two or three days since, and he informs us that 1,000 men will be at work on this end of said road within ten days, and that work will soon commence upon the Crow Wing portion also. The General has just closed a contract with the L. S. & M. Railroad for the receiving at this point (not at St. Paul, mind you) of all the iron necessary for the Northern Pacific. There seems to be no doubt but that the road will be completed to the Red River in one year from the 1st of July. Gen. Jack Casement offered to complete that portion of the road in seven months, but he was underbid by the parties who were awarded the contract.—[Duluth Tribune.
The Northwestern Construction Company returned from their business trip to the junction of the N. P. R. R. with the L. S. & M. R. R. yesterday morning, and we learn the following facts:
The company have a good wagon road constructed for eight miles, and a sufficient force is at work to complete about one mile per day. This road is to be pushed through to the Mississippi, and is on or as near the established line of the railroad as it is practicable to build it. The company are sub-letting small divisions of the road so as to insure its completion to the Mississippi within the time specified—next December. Ten miles have already been let, six miles of it being to Smith, Gould & Co., of Ohio. They are experienced railroad builders, and the fact that they commenced work with a crew of men the next day after the contract was awarded to them shows them to be men of energy—the kind wanted all along the line. Other portions of the road will be sublet as fast as the engineers can prepare the work.
The season promises to be a very favorable one for railroad building—neither too wet or too dry, and the insects are not half so troublesome as last year. This will make a difference of 20 per cent in the amount of work men will do, while it may tend to lessen the price and increase the comfort of the laborers.—[Minneapolis Tribune, July 1st. (St. Cloud Journal, 07 July 1870, p. 1, c. 9)

21 July
PROGRESS ON THE NORTHERN PACIFIC.—Orders were received last week at the engineer headquarters, five miles out from the junction, not to permit anymore sub-contracts until the practical engineering work was further along. The contractors are crowding engineers beyond reasonable expedition. There is no difficulty in obtaining laborers; they are swarming off the Lake Superior & Mississippi Railroad, now pretty nearly completed. The energetic John C. Logan, who has a sub-contract from John Ross, was in town the past week and purchased four stout two-horse teams and wagons for his job on the Northern Pacific. Supplies of various kinds are constantly going up from Duluth.—[Duluth Minnesotian. (St. Cloud Journal, 21 July 1870, p. 2, c. 3)

02 August
NORTHERN PACIFIC NEWS.—Mr. S. T. Wood, who has been engaged with Mr. C. H. Alsop’s surveying party, returned from Crow Wing on Tuesday, and from him we obtain some items of interest. The party had just finished a line from Otter Tail Lake to the Mississippi river—starting from the southwest end of the lake, near the outlet, passing by the northwest end of West Leaf Lake, down the south side of the Leaf river, crossing Crow Wing river at Wadena, the “old Crossing,” down the valley of the Crow Wing, keeping on the north side, passing about a mile above Chippewa Agency, and striking the Mississippi about seven miles above Crow Wing and three miles below French Rapids. With the exception of a few miles at Leaf Lake, where there is is an ascent of about 200 feet, there is but little hard railroading country. Most of the way is level. It is the best line that has yet been run westward from the river; and the fifteen miles last run have been established as the permanent line of the road.
By the surveys, the distance from the river to the lake is about 75 miles. The country, for farming purposes, is not very good for 20 miles from the Crow Wing river—except well up northward. After that there is a steady improvement all the way to Otter Tail. The soil is sandy until beyond the lake, when there is a clay subsoil. There is plenty of water, lakes and streams, with magnificent meadow lands and oak openings. There are are hundreds of fine claims yet to be taken, although emigrants are going in rapidly. Between the river and Otter Tail, on the regular road, there are three stopping places, or stations: “Jack’s”: 15 miles from the river; 20 miles further is Roy’s; Deer Creek is 30 miles more; Otter Tail, 15 miles.
It is more than probable that another survey will be made, commencing about forty miles west of the Mississippi and running north of Rush lake, just south of Detroit lake, and on to Georgetown. Mr. Alsop is expected to arrive here tomorrow, when his party will be discharged. Mr. Kimberley’s party started from the point of intersecting the Mississippi, and is running eastward, intending to connect with a line Mr. Reno is running westward from the Dalles near Duluth. There are now three parties in the Otter Tail country, surveying for a line to the Red River.
Mr. J. Pumpeilly, who has been engaged on a line from near the Crow Wing crossing to Rush Lake, was summoned by a messenger on Monday of last week to go to St. Paul. He returned on Tuesday, and started yesterday for Crow Wing. It is believed that the west end of his line, (to Rush lake) will be established as the line of the road. (St Cloud Journal, 04 August 1870, p. 3, c. 2)

04 August
—The first iron for the Northern Pacific railway left Detroit on Tuesday night of last week for Duluth on the steamer R. G. Coburn. The consignment consists of 200 tons of first-class T rail, manufactured in Pennsylvania. (St. Cloud Journal, 04 August 1870, p. 4, c. 1)

10 August
GOV. SMITH’S PARTY.—Teams, camp equipage and a complete outfit for Gov. Smith’s Northern Pacific party, arrived here yesterday, and went into camp. The Governor is expected to arrive this evening or tomorrow, when he will start for the Red River, going as far as Pembina.
LATER.—The party arrived on the noon train today. It is composed as follows:
Ex-Governor J. Gregory Smith, of Vermont, President N. P. R. R.
Gen. Ira Spaulding, Chief Engineer N. P. R. R.
Geo. A. Brackett, of Minneapolis.
Thos. H. Canfield, of Vermont.
Dr. Thayer, of Vermont.
Mr. Eugene Putnam, of Vermont, private secretary to Gov. Smith.
Thos. C. Hawley, of Vermont.
Geo. G. Smith, of Vermont.
W. L. Millis, of Boston.
Mr. P. Lenk, of Toledo, Ohio.
We learn that from here a portion of the party will go to the crossing of the road a few miles above Crow Wing, to finally locate a portion of the line; then return to this place, and go, as already stated, to Red River, via the Otter Tail country. Geo. Brackett is master of transportation and supplies. (St. Cloud Journal, 11 August 1870, p. 3, c. 1)

11 August
The docks at Duluth are covered with iron for the Northern Pacific R. R. (St. Cloud Journal, 11 August 1870, p. 1, c. 9)

NORTHERN PACIFIC.
_____


Gov. Smith’s Northern Pacific party started from St. Paul on Saturday for Duluth. They will remain there for a few days, then return to Minneapolis, after which they will come to St. Cloud. Here they will be provided with teams and tents, and start for the Red River, to make a careful observation of the country and locate certain portions of the road. (St. Cloud Journal, 11 August 1870, p. 2, c. 1)

THE Northern Pacific Railroad Company have filed with the Secretary of the Interior the first mortgage upon their franchise lands and other property for $5,000,000 to secure the issue of a corresponding amount of bonds. Twenty-five internal revenue stamps of the value of $200 each ($35,000) are affixed to the instrument. (St. Cloud Journal, 11 August 1870, p. 2, c. 2)

13 August
Preliminary maps of N. P. routes in Minnesota, Oregon, and Washington Territory are filed with U.S. Department of the Interior.

John Gregory Smith, President, Northern Pacific Railroad, 1866-1872, ca. Unknown.
Source: Unknown
John Gregory Smith was the third of the war Governors of the state of Vermont, the organizer and the head for years of the great Central Vermont railroad system, and one of the projectors of the Northern Pacific, was for nearly thirty years the most potent personality in Vermont affairs. He was born at St. Albans, July 22, 1818, and was the son of John Smith, a pioneer railroad builder in Vermont, and a leading lawyer and public man of his generation, representing St. Albans nine successive years in the Legislature and serving one term in Congress. The family came from Bare, Mass. John Gregory graduated from the University of Vermont in 1841, and subsequently from the Yale law school. He at once associated with his father in the practice of law and incidentally in railroad management.
At the death of his father in 1858 John Gregory succeeded to the position of trustee under the lease of the Vermont & Canada R. R. Simultaneously he entered politics, and for many years the career in each line was involved with the other. The roads ran down so that in 1865 trust bonds began to be issued to provide for repairs, and from this Governor Smith advanced to a large policy of “development” forming by leases and purchases a great “through system of roads, all under the authority” of the court of chancery, and as an extension of the policy of repairs. The emissions of “trust” bonds continued till 1872, when $4,356,600 were out. When the financial panic struck the country, these structures tumbled, the rent payment to the Vermont & Canada was defaulted, notes went to protest, a legislative investigation was held, and a long and complicated litigation ensued. Governor Smith and his management, generally speaking, came out of the courts successful, but before the end was reached a compromise was effected by which new securities were issued to the different interests and the “Consolidated Railway of Vermont” formed, still under Smith’s management. He was one of the originators of the Northern Pacific railroad enterprise and was the president of the corporation from 1866-1872, when he retired amid the troubles that were thickening about both companies. Under his lead five hundred and fifty-five miles of the road were built.

Ann Eliza Brainerd Smith for whose father, Lawrence, the city of Brainerd was named, 1901.
Source: The Vermonter, December 1901, Volume 7, Number 5
He entered the Legislature as St. Albans’ representative in 1860, and in ‘61 and ‘62 was speaker of the House, winning such popularity that he was unanimously nominated for Governor in 1863 and re-elected in ‘64. And none are there to deny the high quality of his service to the state and nation in those days. He was the friend and confidant of Lincoln and Stanton. He was particularly solicitous in caring for the Vermont boys at the front, and his many deeds of kindness won him many enthusiastic and life-long admirers. He was chairman of the state delegation to the national Republican conventions in 1872, 1880, and 1884. After his retirement from the Governor’s chair he held no public office, though for about twenty years he was the master of Vermont politics.
He was frequently afterward talked of for a seat in the United States Senate, particularly in 1886, when quite a breezy little fight was made for him, and again in 1891 after Edmunds’ resignation. But in both cases he withdrew his name.
He was a very remarkable man—shrewd, far-seeing, persuasive, and yet iron-handed in his determination to carry his purposes. He had a wonderful faculty, with his wide knowledge of human nature and his singular affability of manner, of winning other men to his support, and his marked executive ability made successful the schemes he was so facile in organizing and inaugurating. He was prominently interested in several local business enterprises, and was president of Welden National Bank, the People’s Trust Co., and the Franklin county Creamery Association. He was a life-long member of the Congregational church, and a liberal giver for church purposes, a late contribution being a gift of some $7,000 for remodeling the church edifice. In 1888 he gave the village of St. Albans an elegant bronze fountain costing $5,000, which now adorns the public park. His palatial residence in St. Albans has been the scene of many gatherings, at which Governor and Mrs. Smith have dispensed a courteous hospitality. He married in 1842, Ann Eliza, daughter of Hon. Lawrence Brainerd, who has written several novels and other charming books and who survives him with five children: George G., in business in Minneapolis, Minn., Edward., president of the Central Vermont R. R., Mrs. C. O. Steven of Boston, and Mrs. Rev. D. S. Mackay of St. Albans.
Governor Smith died at St. Albans after a month’s illness, Nov. 6, 1891. (Men of Vermont: An Illustrated Biographical History, Proctor, Davenport and Fuller, Transcript Publishing Company, 1894, p. 96)

NOTE: The Smith home was a target of an 1864 Confederate raid on St. Albans, during the Civil War, but the raiders bypassed the house while fleeing after robbing the town's banks. For her actions in defending the Smith home and efforts to rally the people of St. Albans in pursuing the raiders, Governor Peter Washburn honored Ann Eliza Brainerd Smith by naming her a brevet Lieutenant Colonel on his staff. She died in St. Albans, Vermont on 06 Januay 1905.

15 August

Northern Pacific Items—The New Town
at the R. R. Crossing—Antagonism of
Races—A General Batch of News
Items.
_____


CROW WING, Aug. 15th, 1870.


EDITOR JOURNAL.Gov. Smith, Gen. Spaulding and G. A. Brackett, of the Northern Pacific, have been and gone. Leaving here Friday [12 August] morning on the commodious, &c., &c., &c., steamer Pokegama, they went up the Mississippi to where the last and best line of the N. P. R. R. crossed the Mississippi, and located the line for good; named the new town that is to be “O-ge-ma-qua [sic] [OGAMAGUA],” and steamed down to this place by dinner time, and then back to Sauk Rapids the same day. The excitement is not intense. Two hotels have begun at O-ge-ma-qua [sic] [Ogamagua] [Brainerd], of which being translated, means “Big man’s woman,” otherwise Queen) for one of which the proprietor has already expended twenty dollars in the purchase of lumber alone. There is a speculator for you! “He’s sly! devilish sly! is old Joe Bagstock!” and knows what he is about.
Peake has gone below after a fresh supply of goods, their store having been literally cleaned out in the last few weeks.
The telegraph office is in the room over the store, and is running under a full head of one lightning power.
There was one interesting case of a fight yesterday morning, to break the monotony. A tangle-footed Frenchman ran against a long-haired “Ab-oo-rig-i-ne,” whereupon “Aboo” clinched him and they pounded each other till satisfied. Four visual organs of purplish-black, two incarnadine nasal extremities and handfuls of long and short black hair, irregularly mixed, bear witness to the struggle.
Whipple “eats us” and “sleeps us,” and we snore ourselves. A tall man named Benjamin Edict (who by the way eats like an editor) is acknowledged to have the most snore-ous voice of any in the crowd. Major Bassett wasn’t here, but it is believed by good judges of the article that Mr. Edict is ahead.
Col. Owen started out toward Otter Tail this morning with provisions and “sich” for a party in that direction. Engineers Kimberley, Reno, Tooley and Crocker are here preparing to make a move early in in the week.
Major Atcheson, Indian Agent, has gone below.
Blueberries are yet abundant, raw, roasted, baked and stewed, and palatable in every shape.
There is nothing going on out of the even tenor (and hass) of the Crow Wing way. LOGOS.
(St. Cloud Journal, 18 August 1870, p. 3, c. 4)

J. Gregory Smith, President of the Northern Pacific Railroad, sends a telegram from St. Cloud to financier, Jay Cooke, announcing that “The Crossing” had been selected and its tentative name would be “Ogemaqua [sic] [Ogamagua] Queen City.” (Oldtimers II: Stories of Our Pioneers in the Cass and Crow Wing Lake Region, Volume II, Carl A. Zapffe, Echo Publishing and Printing, Incorporated, Pequot Lakes, Minnesota: 1988, p. 125)

NOTE: On 01 October 1870 the Northern Pacific Board of Directors changed Ogemaqua [sic] [Ogamagua] to Brainerd. (Oldtimers II: Stories of Our Pioneers in the Cass and Crow Wing Lake Region, Volume II, Carl A. Zapffe, Echo Publishing and Printing, Incorporated, Pequot Lakes, Minnesota: 1988, p. 126)

NOTE: CONSTRUCTION work on the Northern Pacific Railroad began in the summer of 1870. With the five millions of dollars received from Jay Cooke and Company and the prospective large receipts from the sale of bonds, the President and directors felt that the time had come for energetic efforts to build the line. Detailed surveys were completed during the spring from Thomson’s Junction to the crossing of the Mississippi River, where a town was laid out, and named Brainerd, in honor of the father of President Smith’s wife. (History of the Northern Pacific Railroad, Eugene V. Smalley, G. P. Putnam & Sons, New York: 1883, p. 185)

Track laying on the Northern Pacific Railroad commenced at the junction on Monday. Iron is being daily landed at Duluth for this road, to be in readiness to lay as fast as the grading is finished. (St. Cloud Journal, 18 August 1870, p. 3, c. 7)

18 August

One locomotive and five hundred tons of iron for the Northern Pacific road arrived at Duluth on Thursday. (St. Cloud Journal, 18 August 1870, p. 2, c. 2)

THE NORTHERN PACIFIC RAILROAD.
_____

RETURN FROM CROW WING AND
START FOR RED RIVER.
_____

Another Survey of the St. Cloud
Branch Line.
_____


On Thursday, Gov. Smith, President of the N. P. R. R., accompanied by Gen. Ira Spaulding, Chief Engineer; Thos. H. Canfield, General Land Commissioner; and Mr. Geo. A. Brackett, came up on the noon train, and went on to Crow Wing. After finally determining the crossing of the river at that place, and locating a portion of the line, as designated in this paper some two weeks ago, the party returned to St. Cloud, arriving here on Saturday. They were joined here by Gov. Smith’s wife, son and daughter; Hon. Wm. Windom and son, Winona; Rev. Douglas, of Winona; Dr. Thayer and Thos. C. Hawley, of Vermont; W. L. Millis, of Boston; P. Lenk, of Toledo; Mrs. Gen. Spaulding; and E. Putnam, Gov. Smith’s Private Secretary.
The entire party started out in comfortable conveyances provided for them, and with all camping equipage. They reached Sauk Centre on Monday, and expected to make Alexandria by the following evening.
The ladies all returned from Sauk Centre, arriving here on Tuesday evening.
The remainder of the party will go through the Otter Tail country, to the Red River, not going, probably, much below Georgetown. From what we can learn, their purpose is mainly to take a careful look at the country between St. Cloud and the Red River, and to select a few of the principal points. They expect to be gone about two weeks.

BRANCH LINE FROM ST. CLOUD.

On Monday, Mr. C. H. Alsop started with a party of seventeen men, (with four pack horses and one team) to make another survey for the branch line of the Northern Pacific. He will run northwest from here. Whether he will intersect the main line near Otter Tail or near Crow Wing depends entirely on the character of the country, and cannot now be told. The party will be absent about four weeks.
The impression seems to be, that, owing to the unsettled condition of financial affairs, work will not be commenced on the Branch Line until after the Main Line shall have been completed to Red River, which will be by next July. In the meantime the necessary surveys will be made and the line probably definitely determined on. (St. Cloud Journal, 18 August 1870, p. 3, c. 2)

24 August
THE NORTHERN PACIFIC RAILROAD.—Col. A. Allen, who in connection with Gen. Bishop, has taken a contract for building a section of about thirty-five miles, between the Mississippi and Crow Wing rivers, was in this city yesterday, making arrangements for carrying on the work. About six hundred men will be employed in the construction of this part of the Northern Pacific Railroad, and it requires no small amount of executive ability to manage such a force as this is a new country, far away from all settlements, and still farther away from every base of supplies. Picks, shovels, wheelbarrows, tents, provisions, and hundreds of little things are to be looked after, and all these things are being purchased in this market, with a lavish hand, to supply the army of men who will soon be employed in building the great trans-contintental route across the continent.—[St. Paul Press. (St. Cloud Journal, 25 August 1870, p. 2, c. 3)

01 September
—The Minneapolis Tribune announces that the Northern Pacific Railroad company have decided to cross the Mississippi at Crow Wing village, and to carry their line north of Rush Lake, instead of south of it, leaving Ottertail City some ten to fifteen miles off the road. (St. Cloud Journal, 01 September 1870, p. 2, c. 5)

08 September

NORTHERN PACIFIC ROUTE AP-
PROVED.
_____


The Secretary of the Interior has approved the route of the Northern Pacific Railroad Company from its eastern terminus, at the mouth of Montreal river, on Lake Superior, in Wisconsin, to Seattle, on Puget’s Sound, Washington Territory. This route traverses the southern [sic] part of Wisconsin, passing at or near the head of Lake Superior, in Minnesota; thence west through the counties of Carlton, Cass, Wadena, and Otter Tail; thence northwest by way of Georgetown, on the Red River of the North, to Fort Totton, on Devil’s Lake, in Dakota Territory; from this point to the southwest, following to a great extent the valley of the Yellowstone river, in Montana Territory through the mountains to Salmon river in Idaho Territory; thence along the along the valley of that river to near its mouth, from thence it reaches Columbia river at Walla-Walla, and following that river west to Vancouver’s and thence north to Monticello, it then leaves it, and continues north along Puget’s Sound and the adjacent waters to the international boundary in Washington Territory. Maps are in course of preparation showing the line of the road and limit of land grants to the extent of ten miles on each side of Seattle, on Puget’s Sound, and when completed will be transmitted to the proper district land settlement on entry of lands granted.—[St. Paul Press. (St. Cloud Journal, 08 September 1870, p. 2, c. 1)

Mid-September

Mark H. Kellogg (top row, left, standing), General Ira Spaulding (top row, third from left) and staff of surveyors, including Thomas Lafayette Rosser sitting on the steps in the white hat, 1871.
Source: Minnesota Historical Society
After the main land area for the prospective town at the crossing of the Mississippi River was secured on 13 August 1870 a wave of claim-jumpers immediately converged upon the scene, tied up necessary adjoining property, then demanded outrageous sales prices.
The Directors of the Northern Pacific suddenly reloaded all construction equipment at the Brainerd site on the same barges, rafts and steamboats used to bring it there, with teams hauling the rest of it by land; and they then headed for Old Crow Wing where an alternative crossing site had long been discussed, evaluated and even surveyed.
But this move was a pure ploy, a maneuver of stunning cunning; and it worked. Over a half-dozen claim-jumpers, literally begged to be let back into the fold. Prices dropped so fast as nearly to raise a wind. And the Directors responded just as suddenly as they did before. Snatching Warranty and Quitclaim Deeds off bargaining tables throughout the North Woods, and by the armful, they reloaded the barges and rafts and steamboats and wagons, headed back up the Mississippi to “Ogemaqua [sic] [Ogamagua]” and went back to work. (Oldtimers II: Stories of Our Pioneers in the Cass and Crow Wing Lake Region, Volume II, Carl A. Zapffe, Echo Publishing and Printing, Incorporated, Pequot Lakes, Minnesota: 1988, p. 126)

20 September
NP Surveyors and their wives in Brainerd, ca. 1870.
Source: Caswell & Davy, Duluth, Minnesota
Charles B. White [sic] [should be Isaac U. White] arrives on the west side of the Mississippi River where he sees numerous tents but only one building, which was the shack Lyman White, Agent of the Lake Superior and Puget Sound Company, had constructed to serve as his office. Lyman White’s job was platting town sites, selling town lots and locating industries in suitable places with respect to rail service. Ed White and Isaac U. White [sic] [should be Charles B. White], Charles B. White’s [sic] [should be Isaac U. White’s] father and brother are building the building which became known as the Trading Post. [Note: Charles, Ed and Isaac White are not related to Lyman P. White.] (Brainerd 1871-1946, Carl Zapffe, Colwell Press, Incorporated, Minneapolis, Minnesota: 1946, p. 5)

SEE: 01 April 1873
SEE: 10 May 1873
SEE: 06 August 1875


NOTE: Zapffe, Sr. seems to be confused about which White came on 20 September 1870. According to Ingolf Dillan, in a piece written by I. U. White, it was Isaac U. White who came to Brainerd on 20 September 1870 and found his father, Edward and his brother, Charles B., building the Trading Post. (Brainerd’s Half Century, Ingolf Dillan, General Printing Company, Minneapolis, Minnesota: 1923; pp. 10 & 11) (SEE ALSO: I. U. White Biography; Crow Wing County Historical Society)

25 September
The little steamer, Pokegama, Captain Houghton, made a trip last week with railroad supplies from the Mississippi through Sandy Lake, and thence down a small stream, emptying into the Lake, to within a mile and a half of the St. Louis River. This heretofore has been looked upon as impossible of accomplishment. The steamer returned to Crow Wing on Wednesday. (St. Paul Daily Press, 25 September 1870)

01 October
The Northern Pacific Board of Directors met and officially named the place Brainerd. (Oldtimers II: Stories of Our Pioneers in the Cass and Crow Wing Lake Region, Volume II, Carl A. Zapffe, Echo Publishing and Printing, Incorporated, Pequot Lakes, Minnesota: 1988, p. 126)

10 October
The second building in Brainerd, built of hewn logs by Stuart Seeley [sic], is completed and used as a boarding house, saloon and dance hall, until it burns three years later. This building was located next to the Trading Post. (Brainerd’s Half Century, Ingolf Dillan, General Printing Company, Minneapolis, Minnesota: 1923, p. 15)

13 October
N. P. R. R.—a car load of horses and another of carts came up last evening for the Northern Pacific work. They were started for Crow Wing today. (St. Cloud Journal, 13 October 1870, p. 3, c. 1)

03 November
The Duluth papers are attacking violently the line selected for the building of the Northern Pacific railroad between that place and Georgetown, especially the deflection south to Crow Wing. The “Northwestern Construction Company” is held responsible for this in no gentle terms. The Tribune says that the removal of Col. Johnson, and the appointing of W. Milnor Roberts as Chief Engineer, was done at the instance of Jay Cooke, on account of some of the operations connected with the location of the road. (St. Cloud Journal, 03 November 1870, p. 2, c. 1)

21 November

The New Town of Brainard [sic]—Graphic
Description of the Place.
_____


ELK HORN HOUSE, LITTLE FALLS,
November 21st, 1870.


EDITOR JOURNAL.—Have you been up to Brainard [sic]?—that wonderful city of slabs and tents, on the line of the Northern Pacific railroad, on the east bank of the Mississippi. If not, GO!! Not that it is anything astonishing, but quite the con-tra-ry, considering what a fuss is made about it. From three to six stages a day go up past here, loaded with passengers, and all bound for “The Crossing,” as it is called, or for some point on the road, east or west. And it really is wonderful to see the amount of goods of all descriptions going up somewhere, and the number of teams going both ways. One cannot travel a mile without meeting or passing many. Forty to seventy-five teams a day go by, and mine host Batters gave supper to more than fifty men last night, between ten and twelve o’clock, besides a house full who stopped all night and ate at regular hours. Every stopping place along the road is crowded to its utmost capacity generally. But to return to Brainard [sic] (in imagination only.) It is on a level plain, covered with a thick growth of black pine, or was, but the streets have been cut out through the “heart of the city,” and probably the outside streets will be opened as fast as needed. There are two hotels—the “Brainard [sic] House,” which is two rows of boards set on end, about seven feet high, and after the fashion of a board fence, and covered with a canvass roof; and the “Seely [sic] [Stuart Seelye] House,” which has more lumber in it, being boarded up outside and in, and filled in with saw-dust. This might be made quite a “house,” but in this enlightened day it won’t pay a hotel man to set his customers down to a table without a cloth, to drink out of tin basins and eat off tin plates with their fingers, unless there is really need of it, and in this case there is not, as Hazleton can afford not only table cloths but dishes, at the “Brainard [sic] House,” if it is a tent. The steam saw-mill runs night and day, but the lumber is used for the railroad, so that none can be had to build with, and teams are hauling from Little Elk. The slabs are seized with avidity as soon as they leave the saw, and are fast being made into houses, (?) stables, &c., and in fact the whole thing has jumped into existence in such a hurry that what buildings are made of lumber can hardly stand alone after they shrink. Quite a force are engaged on the bridge; the new railroad hotel, 100x58 feet, is begun, (the frame is up,) and on the whole it gives evidence of something being the matter. But lots are higher now than they will be in the future; for what is to build the concern up when the present need is over? and $400 to $1,000 for a lot is a little too much like the town-site fever of ‘57. The people are laborers, boarding-house keepers, merchants, blacklegs, cutthroats, and, I am happy to add, gentlemen, tho’ the latter are scarce. By the term “gentleman” I don’t mean men who have no business, but those who have business, who know their business, and mind it, and let other folks alone. (We are not overstocked anywhere.)
Fletcher, Bly & Co. have removed their store from Crow Wing to the crossing, and that will no doubt much increase the business, as all the railroad hands get their supplies of that firm. There are fifteen or twenty saloons only, besides a dozen other places where sly drinks are said to be taken, and there are two places where people stay where liquor is not kept. This speaks well for the morals of the place! and affords a good opening for a Good Templars’ Lodge. Little Falls has made a decided step forward in the “moral” business in the last few years, as it is rare to see men drunk in the streets in large numbers on Sunday, as was their wont. Some of the seediest old soaks are now “pillars of temperance.”
The “Elk Horn House” is popular, and should be, for Mrs. Batters don’t object to letting one have two pieces of her nice mince pie at a meal, if his constitution is good, and we are usually willing to risk it.
Yours, LOGOS.
(St. Cloud Journal, 24 November 1870, p. 2, c. 3)

NOTE: Is the Seely/Seelye House mentioned above actually the building built by Stuart Seelye mentioned by Anna Himrod her paper Town of Brainerd, Township 45, Range 31?

22 November
Col. W. Milnor Roberts, Chief Engineer, and Mr. Linsley, First Assistant Chief Engineer of the Northern Pacific came up on Tuesday, and went on up to Brainerd, to go over the Main Line from that place to the Red River. (St. Cloud Journal, 24 November 1870, p. 3, c. 1)

15 December

SAUK RAPIDS.


The cars arrive, crowded with passengers bound for the Northern Pacific, above Crow Wing. (St. Cloud Journal, 15 December 1870, p. 3, c. 3)

...Considerable supplies are daily arriving [at the St. Paul & Pacific Depot in St. Cloud] and being forwarded to the line of the Northern Pacific. The principal points to which goods are sent are Brainard [sic], the crossing of the N. P. R. R. over the Mississippi river, Mud river, forty miles beyond on the railroad, and Otter Tail. Large numbers of patent portable railroad dirt carts are being forwarded to the different contractors on the line. These carts are complete with track, curves and switches all ready to lay down. (St. Cloud Journal, 15 December 1870, p. 5, c. 2)

29 December
JAY COOKE & Co. are advertising the first mortgage bonds of the Northern Pacific Railroad Company. They range from $100 to $10,000, with interest at 7.30 per cent, payable semi-annually in gold, with the principal payable in coin at the end of thirty years. (St. Cloud Journal, 29 December 1870, p. 2, c. 1)

RIOT—For some days past a riot has been progressing among a part of the workmen engaged on the main line of the Northern Pacific. It was caused by the absconding of Gregg & Co., who had subcontracted work from Smith, Gould & Co., without paying their men for the past month’s work. Under some desperate ringleaders, the men refused to work longer, though assured by Smith, Gould & Co.’s superintendent that they should be paid in full. They destroyed shanties, cars and other property. By direction of Gen. Hancock, (on application of Gov. Austin) Col. Mason, of Fort Ripley, sent a detachment of soldiers to quell the riot, and arrest the ringleaders, who will be brought to this city and confined in the jail for trial. (St. Cloud Journal, 29 December 1870, p. 4, c. 4)

SEE: 19 January 1871
SEE: 26 January 1871

1871
January
There are about 1,600 men working on constructing the Northern Pacific railroad, the tracks are now about twenty-eight miles east of Brainerd.

19 January
BRIDGE IRON.—Three car loads of bridge iron arrived direct from Milwaukee on Tuesday, for the Northern Pacific bridge across the Mississippi at Brainerd. (St. Cloud Journal, 19 January 1871, p. 3, c. 1)

The eleven ringleaders in the late Northern Pacific riot were taken to Crow Wing on Monday for their preliminary examination. If found guilty, as they doubtless will be, they will be brought to the jail at this place for safe keeping until the next sitting of the District court.
LATER.—Ten of the prisoners were brought down on Tuesday evening by a squad of soldiers under charge of Lieut. Bryant, and confined in the county jail. One had been discharged at Crow Wing. (St. Cloud Journal, 19 January 1871, p. 3, c. 2)

SEE: 29 December 1870
SEE: 26 January 1871

It is said six thousand more workmen will be put on the Northern Pacific in the spring.
(St. Cloud Journal, 19 January 1871, p. 3, c. 3)

26 January
THE RIOTERS.—The names of the ten rioters arrested on the Northern Pacific work and brought to this place for confinement in the county jail are, John Renwick, John McNeely, John McMillan, Thomas Nash, Robert Nash, Timothy Caskelly, Pat Borland, Dan Connelly, Wm. Powers and Pat Lawless. E. R. Odell had also been arrested, but on the examination before John McGillis, Esq., Justice of the Peace at Crow Wing, was discharged. These men were charged, on oath of E. P. Smith, with having on the 20th of December and certain days subsequent, broken into a warehouse and wagons, taking supplies amounting to $350, with having destroyed tools worth $300, and also a number of cars.
On Saturday a writ of habeas corpus was issued by Judge McKelvy, on application of Hays & Kerr, attorneys for the prisoners, and made returnable on the 30th last. The application is based on the insufficiency of the commitment, and on the ground that the prisoners are charged with no offense known to the statutes of Minnesota or to the common law. (St. Cloud Journal, 26 January 1871, p. 3, c. 1)

SEE: 29 December 1870
SEE: 19 January 1871

16 February

FINANCIAL.
_____

NEW 7-30 GOLD LOAN
OF THE
NORTHERN PACIFIC RAILROAD CO.

SECURED BY FIRST MORTGAGE ON RAILROAD AND
LAND GRANT.
_____

SAFE! PROFITABLE! PERMANENT!
_____

JAY COOKE & CO.


Offer for sale at par and accrued interest the First Mortgage Land Grant Gold Bonds of the Northern Pacific Railroad Company. They are free from United States Tax, and are issued of the following denominations: Coupons $100, $500, and $1,000; Registered $100, $500, $1,000, $5,000, and $10,000.
With the same entire confidence with which we commended Government bonds to Capitalists and People, we now, after the fullest investigation, recommend these Northern Pacific bonds to our friends and the general public.
GOLD PAYMENT.—Both principal and interest are payable in American Gold Coin, at the office of Jay Cooke & Co., New York City—the principal at the end of 30 years, and the interest (at the rate of seven and three-tenths per cent per annum) half yearly, first January and July.
PERFECT SAFETY.—The bonds we are now selling, are secured by a first and only mortgage on all the property and rights of the Northern Pacific Railroad Company, which will embrace on the completion of the work.
1. Over Two Thousand Miles of Road, with rolling stock, buildings, and all other equipments.
2. Over Twenty-two-Thousand Acres of Land to every mile of finished road. This land, agricultural, timbered and mineral, amounting to more than Fifty Million Acres, consists of alternate sections, reach twenty to forty miles on each side of the track, and extending in a broad fertile belt from Wisconsin through the richest portions of Minnesota, Dakota, Montana, Idaho, Oregon and Washington, to Puget Sound.
While the Government does not directly guarantee the bonds of the Road, it thus amply provides for their full and prompt payment by an unreserved grant of land, the most valuable ever conferred upon a great national improvement.
THE MORTGAGE.—The Trustees under the Mortgage, are Messrs. Jay Cooke of Philadelphia and J. Edgar Thompson, President of the Pennsylvania Central Railroad Company. They will directly and permanently represent the interests of the First Mortgage bond holders, and are required to see that the proceeds of the land sales are used in purchasing and canceling the bonds of the Company if they can be bought before maturity at not more than 10 per cent premium; otherwise the Trustees are to invest the proceeds of land sales in United States Bonds or Real Estate Mortgages for the further security of Northern Pacific bond holders. Also, that they have at all times in their control, as security, at least 500 acres of average land to every $1,000 of outstanding first mortgage bonds, besides the railroad itself and all its equipments and franchises.
PROFITABLENESS.— Of course nothing can be safer than the bonds of the United States, but as the Government is no longer a borrower, and as the Nation’s present work is not that of preserving its existence, but that of Developing a continent, we remind those who desire to increase their income and obtain a more permanent investment, while still having a perfectly reliable security, that:
United States 5-20’s at their average premium yield the present purchaser less than 5 1/2 per cent gold interest. Should they be redeemed in five years and specie payments be resumed, they would really pay only 4 3/4 per cent, or if three years only 3 1/2 per cent as the present premium would meanwhile be sunk.
Northern Pacific 7-30’s selling at par in currency yield the investor 7-30 per cent gold interest absolutely for thirty years, free from United States Tax. $1,000 currency invested now in United States 5-20’s will yield per year in gold, say $62.00. $1,000 currency invested in Northern Pacific 7-30’s will yield per year in gold, $80.30. Here is a difference in annual income of nearly one-third, besides a difference of 7 to 10 per cent in principal, when both classes of bonds are redeemed.
THE ROAD NOW BUILDING.—Work was begun in July last on the eastern portion of the line, and the money provided, by the sale to stock holders of some six millions of the company’s bonds, to build and equip the road from Lake Superior across Minnesota to the Red River of the North—233 miles. The grading on this division is now well advanced, the iron is being rapidly laid, several thousand men are at work on the line, and about the first of August next this important section of the road will be in full operation. In the meantime orders have been sent to the Pacific coast for the commencement of the work on the western end in early spring, and thereafter the work will be pushed, both eastward and westward, with as much speed as may be consistent with solidity and a wise economy.
RECEIVABLE FOR LANDS.—These bonds will be at all times, before maturity, receivable, at 1.10, in payment for the Company’s land, at their lowest cash price.
BONDS EXCHANGEABLE.—The registered bonds can be exchanged at any time for coupons, the coupons for registered, and both these can be exchanged for others, payable, principal and interest, at any of the principal financial centers of Europe in the coin of the various European countries.
HOW TO GET THEM.—Your nearest Bank or Banker will supply these bonds in any desired amount, and of any needed denomination. Persons wishing to exchange stocks or other bonds for these, can do so with any of our agents, who will allow the highest current price for all marketable securities.
Those living in localities remote from banks, may send money or other bonds, directly to us by express, and we will send back Northern Pacific bonds at our own risk, and without cost to the investor. For further information, pamphlets, maps, etc., call on or address the undersigned, or any of the Banks or Bankers employed to sell this loan.
FOR SALE BY
T. C. McCLURE, Banker,
And BANK OF ST. CLOUD,
Agents, St. Cloud, Minn.
LUNT, PRESTON & KEAN,
Bankers, Chicago, General Agents for Minnesota, Wisconsin, Illinois and Northern Indiana. (St. Cloud Journal, 16 February 1871, p. 3, c. 5)

March

Northern Pacific Railroad Bridge, ca. 1871.
Source: Minnesota Historical Society
A large wooden-trestle bridge was completed across the Mississippi River for the exclusive use of the railroad. The bridge consisted of four wooden abutments, about 100 feet or less apart, the central two in the water. At the land level the bridge was 647 feet long and 62 feet high. (Brainerd 1871-1946, Carl Zapffe, Colwell Press, Incorporated, Minneapolis, Minnesota: 1946, p. 4)

The Northern Pacific Railroad begins building a car repair shop, it is located on the north side of the tracks about three-quarters of a mile east of the depot, this shop is completed in 1872. (Brainerd 1871-1946, Carl Zapffe, Colwell Press, Incorporated, Minneapolis, Minnesota: 1946, p. 5)

Railroad workers are building the bridge and begin building the Headquarters Hotel. The Depot is built next. At the same time the first building, probably the roundhouse for the repair of the locomotives, is built three quarters of a mile east of the Depot. The NP Colonists’ Reception House is also built during this period. All of these buildings are completed by 1872. (Brainerd 1871-1946, Carl Zapffe, Colwell Press, Incorporated, Minneapolis, Minnesota: 1946, p. 5)

02 March
RAILROAD MATTERS.—It is understood, on good authority, that work will be commenced in the spring on the branch line of the Northern Pacific railroad running from this city northwesterly to Otter Tail City. Also, that the branch on the east side of the river will be extended to Crow Wing, and thence to the crossing of the main line at Brainard [sic].
The engineers engaged on the branch line, whose headquarters were here last fall, expect to commence work again on the branch (though just where is not yet known) next week. (St. Cloud Journal, 02 March 1871, p. 3, c. 1)

04 March
A man named Anderson fell from the bridge at Brainard [sic] (N. P. R. R. crossing) on the 4th, and died the next day. Two men have been found dead in that vicinity within the last two weeks under very suspicious circumstances, but no arrests have been made. The work of laying the track on the west side of the Mississippi is progressing. (St. Cloud Journal, 16 March 1871, p. 2, c. 3)

06 March
Construction train entering Brainerd, ca. 1871.
Source: Minnesota Historical Society
COMPLETED.—The Northern Pacific Railroad was completed on Monday from the Junction, near Lake Superior, to Brainard [sic], the crossing of the Mississippi river, a distance of 91 miles. There was an informal celebration on Tuesday. (St. Cloud Journal, 09 March 1871, p. 4, c. 2)


09 March
Congress has appropriated $60,000 and the Northern Pacific Railroad Company $100,000 for the improvement of the harbor at Duluth. (St. Cloud Journal, 09 March 1871, p. 2, c. 5)

11 March

The Northern Pacific Railroad at the Mississippi.


One significant step in the western progress of our Northern continental Railroad has been completed—the land between the Great Lake and the Great River has been spanned by the iron track—and the Northern Pacific is safely across the Mississippi! From C. F. Hollingsworth the well-known drafting engineer, who reached Duluth on Thursday evening last, we learn the particulars of the completion of the road to Brainerd, the town at the Mississippi Crossing. At about the time long before set, on Monday night, March 6th, the track layers arrived with the iron road within the town precincts of Brainerd, amidst the bonfires and rejoicings of the people, who improvised, also, an informal celebration of the event by a little champagne excitement offered to the Engineer corps at the storehouse of merchant Hill; where all went off joyfully, but soberly and in order; every one seeming to feel that a great stride in progress had been achieved. During Thursday a deep fill detained the track layers from reaching the bridge across the Mississippi; but by Tuesday night all was ready for the train to move forward; and on Wednesday morning tracks being down and the bridge across the Mississippi, seeking the farther beyond where sunset reposes. The Bridge is a handsome and substantial result of the skill of Engineers and Contractors combined. It consists of three spans of the Howe-Truss pattern of 140 feet each, with approaches of about 100 feet on the East side and sixty feet on the West—the centre span being a “through” bridge; its floor being sixty feet above the water, capable of allowing the passage of steamers under it without the necessity of a “draw.” The tracklaying, we understand, will now rapidly proceed beyond the Mississippi—some thirty miles to Leaf River (which is five miles beyond Partridge River)— the bed being already graded and ready to receive it, as fast as Supt. Morford can hurry it up. The laying of this thirty miles will exhaust all the iron now on hand; but it is expected that navigation on the lakes will be open by the time more is needed, when immediately a further supply will be landed at Duluth. The Mississippi crossed, ho! now for the Red River. That spanned, then push on the track for the Missouri—the Yellowstone Valley—The Rocky Mountains—The Pacific. (Duluth Minnesotian, 11 March 1871)

ON Saturday morning a special train left Duluth with a party including Gen. Geo. B. Sargent, financial agent in Europe of the Northern Pacific Railroad, and D. C. Linsley, Esq., Assistant Chief Engineer and General Ira Spaulding, Chief Engineer of the Minnesota Division Northern Pacific Railroad, and a number of invited guests, to go over the First Division of the Northern Pacific. From Duluth to the Junction (with the St. Paul and Lake Superior road) [Lake Superior & Mississippi] the distance is 24 miles; from there to Brainard [sic], the crossing of the Mississippi, 92 miles; total, 116 miles. The road is said to be well built—a good road for a new one. The bridge at Brainard [sic] had just been completed as the party arrived, and the train passed over to the west side of the river. (St. Cloud Journal, 16 March 1871, p. 1, c. 3)

A short train arrives carrying NP officials; its engineer is Adam Brown. (Brainerd 1871-1946, Carl Zapffe, Colwell Press, Incorporated, Minneapolis, Minnesota: 1946, p. 3)

Adam Brown relates, “I remember the circumstances. We cannot turn around here and have to back to the Junction [114 miles in something like four hours]. It is extremely cold, and the fireman and I suffer much. We have no curtains to break the wind. ...J. Cooke, who finances the building of the road, is on the train, with many officers and friends from St. Paul and New York City.” (Brainerd’s Half Century, Ingolf Dillan, General Printing Company, Minneapolis, Minnesota: 1923, p. 19)

SEE: 03 April 1885
SEE: 08 October 1886

16 March
IT is rumored that Gen. Schenck will remain but a short time in England, but will return to accept the position of Chief Attorney of the Northern Pacific, with a salary of $25,000 a year. (St. Cloud Journal, 16 March 1871, p. 2, c. 2)

Work is to be commenced at once on the Northern Pacific docks at Duluth. The first, on the lake side of Minnesota Point, will be 600 feet long, with an ‘L’ 200 feet. (St. Cloud Journal, 16 March 1871, p. 2, c. 4)

GOOD CHANCE FOR TEAMSTERS.—By reference to our advertising columns it will be seen that Messrs. Platt & Barnard want one hundred teams to haul freight from Buffalo river to Red river, on the line of the Northern Pacific railroad. They offer good wages, and guarantee fair dealing with all whom they may engage in this work. Those having teams and desiring a contract will call on or address Platt & Barnard at the Central House, in this city. (St. Cloud Journal, 16 March 1871, p. 3, c. 2)

30 March
The cars are running regularly on the Northern Pacific from Lake Superior, or the Junction, to the Mississippi river. (St. Cloud Journal, 30 March 1871, p. 2, c. 4)

BRAINARD [sic].
_____

Northern Pacific Items—Crow Wing
River Bridge Underway.
_____


BRAINARD [sic], March 30, 1871.


EDITOR JOURNAL.—J. Reno left on Tuesday for Dakota Territory with twenty-six men. By the middle of April about three thousand men will be employed on construction work.
The first span of the Crow Wing River bridge has been completed. The cars are expected to cross in about two weeks.
The roadbed is graded some forty miles west from here and the cars are running twelve miles on that side of the Mississippi. The track is being laid at the rate of half a mile per day.
The first male child was born here last week, and was named Lawrence Brainard [sic], after the town on the opposite side of the river.
Brainard [sic] is in a healthy condition. It is the general opinion that before the expiration of two years this town will contain from three to five thousand inhabitants.
Barrows, Cobb & Co. have commenced the construction of their large sawmill. They expect to cut up about twenty-five thousand feet of lumber per day.
ENOTS.
(St. Cloud Journal, 06 April 1871, p. 3, c. 3)

NOTE: It would appear that West Brainerd was once called Lawrence, named after Mrs. J. Gregory Smith’s father.

06 April
A letter from Jay Cooke to Senator Ramsey says, “the amount of immigration into Minnesota this year along the line of the Northern Pacific Railroad will be enormous.” (St. Cloud Journal, 06 April 1871, p. 2, c. 2)

13 April

PROGRESS OF THE NORTHERN
PACIFIC RAILROAD.
_____


The energy with which the building of this great thoroughfare is being pushed forward is an added guarantee of its early completion and its wise management. We learn from the financial agents of the road, Messrs. Jay Cooke & Co., that, at the present date, the grading is nearly finished for 266 miles from Lake Superior, through Central Minnesota, to the eastern border of Dakota; trains are running over 230 miles of completed track; the Mississippi river is bridged at Brainerd and once more joined to the Lakes by rail, and track laying is rapidly progressing westward. By September next, trains will run to the Red River, and the grading will probably be far advanced toward the great bend of the Missouri river in central Dakota.
In the meantime, work has been commenced this season on the Pacific coast; a large force of men is already employed in the valley of the Columbia river, in Washington Territory, and hereafter the work of construction will be pushed both eastward and westward toward the center with such rapidity as the best interest of the road may justify.
Including its purchase of the St. Paul and Pacific Road, the Northern Pacific Railroad Company has 413 miles of road now in operation, and before the close of the present season the length of finished track will be at least 560 miles. The new highway to the Pacific is being constructed at the lowest cost compatible with first-class work. (St. Cloud Journal, 13 April 1871, p. 2, c. 4)

23 April

An example of laying track in the early 1870’s, ca. 1870.
Source: Benjamin Franklin Upton, Minnesota Historical Society
The track is now being laid on the Northern Pacific Railroad at the rate of one mile per day, and over 3,000 men are employed on the construction of the work. Cars are running two miles beyond Brainerd. (New York Times, 23 April 1871, p. 1)


27 April
NORTHERN PACIFIC ITEMS.—W. P. Harris & Co., contractors on the Northern Pacific arrived here last Saturday from Chicago, on their way to Oak [Lake], in Becker county, where they have a contract for grading and making thirty-five miles of road. They brought with them five car loads, (50 tons,) of material direct from Chicago without breaking bulk, consisting of thirty large dirt cars with iron railroad track, forty horses with double harness complete for working teams, twenty wagons, provisions, &c. Some forty men accompanied them. They left for their destination on Tuesday.
Mr. O. E. Garrison returned on Monday from a trip along the line of the Northern Pacific as far as Partridge River. The track has been laid, west of the Mississippi, as far as the crossing of the Crow Wing River, and it is expected that by the middle of next month the rails will be down as far as Partridge River. Grading has been done for a considerable distance west of this last named point.
On Tuesday, Gov. Smith, President; A. H. Barney, Treasurer; Col. J. S. Loomis, Land Commissioner; Col. D. C. Linsley, Chief Engineer, and Geo. P. Lee, Paymaster, of the Northern Pacific Railroad; Thos. H. Canfield, President of the Lake Superior and Puget Sound Co.; L. Willis, Gen. Passenger Agent of the Vermont Central Railroad; Hon. Geo. L. Becker, President, and F. R. Delano, Superintendent, of the St. Paul and Pacific Railroad, came up on a special train. Most of the party proceeded at once to Brainerd from which point they will go over the Northern Pacific track to Duluth, returning from there to St. Paul. (St. Cloud Journal, 27 April 1871, p. 3, c. 2)

04 May
The first twenty-five miles of the Northern Pacific Railroad in Washington Territory are to be contracted at once, and proposals have been advertised for in the San Francisco papers. (St. Cloud Journal, 04 May 1871, p. 2, c. 3)

It is expected that Detroit City will be the county seat of Becker county. This is a new town on the line of the Northern Pacific—at the head of Detroit Lake. (St. Cloud Journal, 04 May 1871, p. 2, c. 4)

It is stated that there are nearly 3,000 men employed on the construction work of the Northern Pacific road. Track is being laid at the rate of one mile per day. Cars are running now 20 miles beyond Brainerd. (St. Cloud Journal, 04 May 1871, p. 2, c. 5)

08 May

Our Brainerd Letter.

Brainerd, May 8, 1871
Surfacing Up.


Messrs. Ross and Company now have 500 men at work surfacing the road between the Junction and this place. They are pushing the work with vigor, so that passenger coaches can be run between Duluth and Brainerd (the future Metropolis of the Mississippi) in a short time. (Duluth Minnesotian, 13 May 1871)

09 May
John H. Stone and W. W. Nichols, of the N. P. R. R. Headquarters, at Brainerd, were in the city on Tuesday. They report business lively and the town growing. (St. Cloud Journal, 11 May 1871, p. 5, c. 2)

17 May

Shows the route of the NP railroad spur from the main line to Boom Lake built in May 1871.
Source: 1871 Turner Map
The Northern Pacific engineering department records show that on 17 May 1871, a contract was let to Augustus Wilgus and Charles Thayer to build a railroad spur to Boom Lake. The spur started at South Tenth and Front streets and followed the alley between Laurel and Maple to South Fifth, thence southwardly down the river bank to the mill site. It became known as the “Mill Spur.” Only the short piece to South Sixth Street remains today [1946] and it is used mainly for unloading in bound coal, not for hauling outbound wood products as before. (Brainerd 1871-1946, Carl Zapffe, Colwell Press, Incorporated, Minneapolis, Minnesota: 1946, p. 39)

NOTE: The Charles Thayer mentioned above is likely Dr. Charles P. Thayer, son of Dr. Samuel W. Thayer, the first Medical Director of the Northern Pacific Railroad. Both were employed by the railroad and both were located in Brainerd in the early 1870’s.

SEE: 08 April 1876


25 May
There were 39,000 pounds of barreled pork shipped from Rochester last week, to the men employed on the Northern Pacific Railroad—the first exports of the kind from that town. (St. Cloud Journal, 25 May 1871, p. 2, c. 4)

04 June

FROM BRAINERD.
_____

Sinking of the N. P. R. R. Track—Gen-
eral Railroad Items—The Future of
St. Cloud.
_____


BRAINERD, JUNE 4, 1871.


EDITOR JOURNAL.—I visited Loon Lake, twenty miles east of here, near which place some two hundred feet of the Northern Pacific's track has sunk. The roadbed is sixteen feet under water. The construction Company are at work trying to fill up the swamp, but trains cannot run for twenty days yet. There are two other places between here and Mud River which will, I think, go down in the same way. The balance of the road is in good condition.
The bridge across the Crow Wing River has been finished, and the grading done as far west as Leaf Lake.
Mr. J. H. Reno, Asst. Chief Engineer of the Dakota Division, returned on Friday. He has been as far west as the Missouri. The survey is far better than was expected. His party is still there, and two more are to be organized from Dakota the last of this month.
Iron for the extension of the St. Paul & Pacific Railroad from Sauk Rapids to Brainerd, has arrived at the Junction.
Brainerd grows a little. Many predict two thousand inhabitants within 10 years.
Mr. Linsley, Ass’t. Chief Engineer of the N. P. R. R. Co., will return from New York the first of July.
ENOTS.
(St. Cloud Journal, 15 June 1871, p. 2, c. 3)

The engineers of the Northern Pacific have found an excellent line through central Dakota, striking the Missouri near the mouth of Heart river, and passing through a much better country than the northwesterly route originally projected, by the way of Devil’s Lake. This line—the more southern one—we learn, has been adopted as the route of the railroad, and the western end of the Minnesota section has been relocated, to conform to the new line through Dakota, crossing the Red River south of the mouth of the Cheyenne. The work of grading the road is being rapidly pushed forward.—[St. Paul Press. (St. Cloud Journal, 15 June 1871, p. 2, c. 3)

“Carleton,” the well-known Boston correspondent, is again in the State to go over the line of the Northern Pacific. (St. Cloud Journal, 15 June 1871, p. 2, c. 4)

21 June

COLONIES FOR NORTHERN MINNE-
SOTA.
_____


The Duluth Tribune says a colony of forty-nine persons, from St. Lawrence county, N. Y., left that place on Wednesday of last week for Pelican Lake, Otter Tail county, where they have thirty-eight thousand acres of land, purchased from the Northern Pacific Railroad Company. These people, who are well-to-do farmers, report that a large number more, estimated at from five to ten thousand persons, from that portion of New York, will soon come to Northern Minnesota. A colony from Boston, bound for Detroit Lake, in Becker county, passed through Duluth some days since. Mr. Huntingdon, of Toledo, Ohio, has gone to Red River to select six thousand acres of land for a colony from that place. We have already spoken of the colony from Rochester, which has located on the line of the Northern Pacific in the northwestern portion of this State. The immigration to this part of Minnesota is almost incredible. (St. Cloud Journal, 29 June 1871, p. 3, c. 1)

22 June
The law prohibiting the sale of liquor on the Northern Pacific Railroad, is a dead letter. (St. Cloud Journal, 22 June 1871, p. 2, c. 5)

15 July

THE ST. PAUL AND PACIFIC RAIL-
ROAD BONDS IN LONDON.
_____


From the Economist, July 15, 1871:
Subscriptions are invited by Messrs. Lippmann, Rosenthal & Co., of Amsterdam, and by Messrs. Robert Benson & Co., of London, for $15,000,000 United States currency, or £3,000,000 sterling for 7 per cent first mortgage extension bonds of the First Division of the St. Paul and Pacific Railroad Company. The “First Division,” being already the owner of two lines of railway through fertile parts of the State of Minnesota, is authorized to construct two extensions—one of 293 miles, to cross the Northern Pacific Railroad and terminate in Pembina county, on the Red River and on the British frontier, and the other of 35 miles, to make a junction with the Northern Pacific at Brainerd, to which the latter company has already constructed a line from Duluth, on Lake Superior, which will become an outlet for the produce to be carried over the present extension. (St. Cloud Journal, 03 August 1871, p. 2, c. 3)

August
During August the steamer Pokegama was engaged in tri-weekly runs between Little Falls and Brainerd. This service continued well into the fall and ended in late November when the small steamboat was caught in the ice on the Mississippi. (The Northern Pacific in Minnesota, John C. Luecke, Grenadier Publications, St. Paul, Minnesota: 2005, p. 45)

01 August

ANOTHER DISTINGUISHED PARTY
COMING.
_____


The commissioners appointed by the leading bankers of Germany and Austria to examine and report on the Northern Pacific Railroad have arrived in New York, and are expected in Duluth on Monday next via the Lakes. They are to visit the Red River of the North and return via the St. Paul & Pacific to St. Paul where they will spend a day or two prior to their departure for San Francisco and Puget Sound.
These gentlemen occupy high positions in their own country, and are selected from the municipal cities as follows: Mr. Aug. Folsch, one of the chief engineers of Austria; Mr. N. J. Den Tex, Secretary of the Board of Trade of Amsterdam; Mr. Hass, of Berlin; Mr. Biertschwert, of Frankfort; LeChevelier R. De Gumburg, of Vienna. These gentlemen are accompanied by G. B. Sargent, of Duluth, who will make the trip and return to Europe with them. Mr. S. is the financial agent of the N. P. in Europe. He arrived from Europe by this morning’s train, and was met in this city by his wife and daughter. They all took the morning train for Duluth.—[St. Paul Dispatch, Aug. 1 (St. Cloud Journal, 03 August 1871, p. 2, c. 3)

02 August
Three heavy and finely finished locomotives arrived here yesterday for the Northern Pacific Railroad.—[Duluth Tribune. (St. Cloud Journal, 03 August 1871, p. 2, c. 4)

10 August
Four additional locomotives arrived last week for the Northern Pacific Railroad, making six received lately.—[Duluth Tribune. (St. Cloud Journal, 10 August 1871, p. 2, c. 4)

16 August

THE NORTHERN PACIFIC.
_____


We are informed that the Directors of the Northern Pacific Company have examined that portion of their line laying between the junction with the Lake Superior and Mississippi road and Crow Wing river, a distance of one hundred and twelve miles, and have expressed themselves entirely satisfied with the manner of its construction, and also with the management of the Northwestern Construction Company, reports to the contrary notwithstanding. On September 1st the section of road above referred to will be formally turned over to the Northern Pacific Company by the Northwestern Construction company, and regular trains will at once be put in operation between Crow Wing River and the Junction.
The Construction Company are pushing the work vigorously, beyond the present terminus, and will have the line completed to Red River, probably, during the month of November.
It is understood to be the purpose of the Northern Pacific company to erect a large saw mill at Brainerd, very soon.
Lumbermen who desire going into the Upper Mississippi country, the coming fall and winter, will be enabled to reach Brainerd by rail, and at reasonable rates, thus making easy what has been a tedious trip.—[Pioneer of 16th. (St. Cloud Journal, 24 August 1871, p. 2, c. 3)

28 August

SEALED PROPOSALS
Will be Received at the Engineer’s Office Northern
Pacific Railroad Company,

AT BRAINERD, MINN.

Until

SEPTEMBER 30th, 1871,

FOR

Six Hundred Thousand Ties


Eight feet long and not less than six inches thick and seven inches face, of Tamarac, Oak, Ash, Norway Pine, or Rock Elm, to be delivered on the line of the Northern Pacific Railroad, at convenient points for loading upon the cars, between the Junction of the Lake Superior and Mississippi Railroad and the Sheyenne [sic] River, in Dakota Territory.
Bidders will state in their bids, the precise points at which they propose to deliver the ties, and if at more points than one, the number at each point. All ties contracted for to be delivered on or before the 1st day of February, 1872.
The right is reserved of rejecting all bids.
D. C. LINSLEY,
Asst. Chief Engineer.
Brainerd, Minn., Aug. 28th, 1871
(St. Cloud Journal, 31 August 1871, p. 3, c. 5)

29 August

A NEW COLONY FOR MINNESOTA.


Seventeen families from near Marquette, Michigan, selected lands on the line of the Northern Pacific Railroad, in Becker county, Minnesota, last week and are now in transit to their new homes. The committee for the colonists arranged for building materials to be furnished on the ground and ready for use on the arrival of the people. Each family takes 160 acres.—[Press of 29th. (St. Cloud Journal, 31 August 1871, p. 3, c. 1)

September
The first regular passenger train from Duluth arrives in Brainerd. W. P. Spaulding is the Conductor. (History of the Upper Mississippi Valley, Winchell, Neill, Williams and Bryant, Minnesota Historical Company, Minneapolis: 1881, p. 644)

05 October
Mr. J. B. POWER, of St. Paul, who has been engaged in the Surveyor General’s office since 1867, has been appointed Chief Clerk in the Land Department of the Minnesota Division of the Northern Pacific Railroad. (St. Cloud Journal, 05 October 1871, p. 3, c. 3)

SEE: 01 April 1873
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SEE: 01 September 1881
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SEE: 30 July 1882
SEE: 02 August 1882
SEE: 05 February 1917

16 October

THE NORTHERN PACIFIC COMPANY’S
SURVEYS.
_____

Character of the Country—Work on
the Railroad.
_____


BRAINERD, MINN., Oct 16, 1871.


EDITOR JOURNAL.—Seeing several accounts in different papers of late, giving notice of the departure of parties to examine the lands of the Northern Pacific R. R. Co., I thought a few notes from our part of the field might be of interest to you. There are now in the field, engaged in examining, eight parties, of which our party numbers as No. 7. It consists of Geo. M. Andrews, Chief, and LeRoy Grout, Assistant Examiner, and two camp men. Our tract to examine includes Townships 129, 130, 131, 132, 133 of Ranges 34 and 35, in the region of Partridge, Wing, and Long Prairie rivers. Party No. 8 has ten towns immediately east of us. We are required to make a critical examination of every 40-acre tract, as to grade of soil, on a scale of from 1 to 5 (No. 1 being the best and No. 5 worthless); the outline of every meadow, marsh, swamp, &c.; the contour of all prominent hills and ridges, with elevation, &c.; the kind and quality of timber, the number of cords of wood that can be cut per acre or, if pine, the number of thousand feet on each 40; the general drainage; course of streams with force of current, and character of banks, water powers, &c.; including not only railroad but government and private lands; the object being to make a complete topographical map of the whole country, within the limits of the grant, thus giving to settlers a complete and comprehensive description of the advantages of the country for settlement. Our party commenced operations on the 29th ult., and we have nearly completed the examination of Town 133, R. 34. We have found some very fair oak and maple timber, but there is also a large amount of tamarac [sic] swamp which is about worthless. Of pine timber there is but little in this town, but we expect to find large bodies farther south.
The weather thus far has been until within two or three days, very fine, and the dryness of the season rendered the swamps in fair condition to examine. Friday and Saturday nights were cold, and ice half an inch thick formed in the river. The work necessarily goes slow on account of having to pack everything with us. Game, such as deer, partridge, &c., is very plenty, but as the only shooting-iron I have is a hatchet, they are safe from harm.
Tracklaying on the railroad is completed to Floyd Lake, and the Company has accepted the road as far as Otter Tail. The track, for a new one, westward from here, is in a remarkably good condition.
If these few and hurried lines are acceptable, I may drop you a few more as opportunity offers.
Truly yours, LEROY GROUT.
Asst. Land Examiner, N. P. R. R.
(St. Cloud Journal, 19 October 1871, p. 2, c.’s 3 & 4)

21 October
Dr. W. R. Hunter, in the Medical Department of the Northern Pacific Railroad Company, returned on Saturday from the Main Line, along which he has been engaged during the summer. The cars are now running to Oak Lake, and will be running to Red River in about four weeks. The Dr. will look after the health of the laborers along the line from this city to Brainerd. (St. Cloud Journal, 26 October 1871, p. 3, c. 2)

11 November
We learn with satisfaction, that that good fellow and excellent workman, Daniel S. Childs has received the contract for building the (frame) roundhouse for the Northern Pacific R. R. at Brainerd. It is to contain twelve stalls for locomotives, and must be... (Duluth Minnesotian, 11 November 1871)

21 November
Map of final location of the line in Minnesota filed with U.S. Department of the Interior.

25 November
The roundhouse for the Northern Pacific R. R. at Brainerd, contracted for with the Duluth Manufacturing Company on Monday last, was, we understand ready for raising yesterday—Capt. McQuade and Dan Childs having “pushed things.” (Duluth Minnesotian, 25 November 1871)

30 November
The Duluth firm of Shoenberger & Bryant have received a further contract from the Northern Pacific Railroad Company for building 300 platform cars. (St. Cloud Journal, 30 November 1871, p. 2, c. 2)

07 December
The whole land grant of the Northern Pacific Railroad in this State, exclusive of the St. Paul and Pacific, is 3,200,000 acres. (St. Cloud Journal, 07 December 1871, p. 2, c. 3)

10 December
At Brainerd on the 10th inst., a party of gentlemen connected with the Northern Pacific Railroad and Northwestern Construction Company were returning east from the end of the track to Detroit Lake, when the car in which they were ran off the track and turned bottom side up, about twenty miles west of Detroit Lake, injuring some of the party seriously. D. C. Shepard has his arm dislocated at the shoulder, George A. Brackett had his leg broken above the knee, and A. O. Canfield received severe injuries on the head and face.—[Minneapolis Tribune. (St. Cloud Journal, 21 December 1871, p. 2, c. 4)

14 December
THE NEW YORK Tribune has the following items concerning Gen. Rosser, one of the most efficient engineers on the North Pacific:
Gen. Rosser furnished, in his warlike days, food for considerable newspaper comment, but nothing that redounds so much to his credit as this: When the war ended, instead of remaining in the South and nursing his hate, he struck northward and began to, for want of better work, to chop wood on the Lake Superior Railroad, and by modesty and industry has become chief engineer of a division of the line. (St. Cloud Journal, 14 December 1871, p. 2, c. 2)

SEE: 29 February 1872
SEE: 20 July 1872
SEE: 25 October 1872
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SEE: 14 February 1873
SEE: 01 March 1873
SEE: 18 March 1873
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SEE: 15 April 1876
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SEE: 27 December 1879

Among the incidents arising from the recent severe snow storm along the line of the Northern Pacific was the blockade for several days of the Northwestern Construction Company’s business car, some twenty miles east of Fargo on the Red River. The car was snowed in just seventy-two hours, during which period its occupants anxiously awaited “the good time coming.” (St. Cloud Journal, 14 December 1871, p. 2, c. 3)

25 December
According to a statement by Messrs. Jay Cooke & Company, the Northern Pacific is now completed across the State of Minnesota, 255 miles, from Duluth to Fargo. (Scientific American, Volume XXVI, Number 13, New York, 23 March 1872)

28 December
The Record describes the process of “bucking” through a snow drift in a cut on the Northern Pacific near Milton Station. Two locomotives were coupled together, with a caboose, and took a start of two miles. “From the station eastward it is down grade, and as the engines neared the cut they seemed fairly to fly, and hardly to touch the rails, so great was their speed. On they come, the cut is reached, the plunge into the drift is made—a whirling, swirling, flying mass of snow in the air, a rushing sound hardly to be described, the whole seeming like the rush and fury of twenty blinding snow storms concentrated into a small compass of space and a few seconds of time—and the cut is passed. So great was the momentum, and the force, that after passing the drift the engines ran a long distance out of the cut before they could be brought to a stand.” (St. Cloud Journal, 28 December 1871, p. 3, c. 3)

1872
25 January
An affray occurred at the Northern Pacific Junction on Tuesday, in which David Campbell was fatally shot by the notorious D. Shumway, of Brainerd. The latter surrendered himself. (St. Cloud Journal, 25 January 1872, p. 2, c. 4)

F
ebruary
The first railroad shops are all on the north side of the tracks, and are of wood. The old brick smoke stack bears the date 1872. In February 1872, the total number of engines on the entire road is but 22; all are of the wood burning type. (Brainerd’s Half Century, Ingolf Dillan, General Printing Company, Minneapolis, Minnesota: 1923, p. 19)

10 February

Northern Pacific Railroad roundhouse, ca. 1872.
Source: Minnesota Historical Society
The roundhouse with capacity for twelve engines, at this point, has been completed by the contractors, Messrs. McQuade & Co., of Duluth, and is one of the most substantial and fine-appearing structures of the kind we ever saw. (Brainerd Tribune, 10 February 1872, p. 3, c. 1)

Finely Executed.


NP roundhouse containing a wood-burning locomotive, Frank Jay Haynes, 1877.
Source: Haynes Foundation, Montana Historical Society
NP Machine Shops, Frank Jay Haynes, 1877.
Source: Haynes Foundation, Montana Historical Society
We have seen the plans, specifications, and drawings in detail, of the machine shops, engine house, and other buildings here, executed by Mr. J. H. Place, who has heretofore been the Architect for the N. P. R. R., but who is now operating with Mr. Bridges as architect in the construction of many buildings along the line. They were, so far as we could judge, as handsomely executed plans as we have ever noticed—and we have seen many from the hands of the first architects of the country. The extent of the plans may be inferred by giving the size of a few of the buildings, as follows:
Machine shop, 240x65 feet.
Boiler shop, 60x60 feet.
Blacksmith shop, 60x60 feet.
Roundhouse, as to be when completed, 28 stalls, accommodating 28 engines—12 stalls now completed—besides many others of minor importance. (Brainerd Tribune, 10 February 1872, p. 3, c. 2)

Progressing.


Under the supervision of that accomplished builder, Mr. Cruikshanks, of Chicago, the mammoth railroad machine shops here are progressing splendidly, notwithstanding the severe weather we have experienced, at times, lately. (Brainerd Tribune, 10 February 1872, p. 3, c. 2)

We are pleased to record the arrival in Brainerd again of Mr. Lyman Bridges, of the firm of Lyman Bridges & Co., builders and general manufacturers of sash, doors, blinds, ready-made houses, etc., etc., Chicago. Mr. Bridges has not only the contract from the N. P. R. R. Co. for constructing the larger portion of their buildings along the line, but has arrangements completed to establish a mammoth factory at this place, similar in character to his noted factory in Chicago. This factory will be put up at once, and he has now on hand an immense stock of every description of building material and finishing material and he will have opened here during the present month, a store filled with this class of goods, and everything in the hardware line. (Brainerd Tribune, 10 February 1872, p. 3, c. 3)

17 February
—The Headquarters Hotel is being finished up in the grandest style. Beautiful suites of office rooms have been furnished for the various Railroad officials in the new part—first floor—while the trowel and brush of first-class artists, in their way, are still going on in the great work of finishing up the grand structure throughout in truly metropolitan style. (Brainerd Tribune, 17 February 1872, p. 3, c. 1)

—Great quantities of saw logs are daily being brought in to the Company’s mills at this place, on flat cars from up the line. Mr. J. M. Ayers has the contract for cutting and delivering these logs, and he is “making hay while the sun shines,” to say the least. He is one of the most experienced lumbermen in Minnesota. (Brainerd Tribune, 17 February 1872, p. 3, c. 1)

Doing a Thriving Business.


The steam saw mill at this place, belonging to the Railroad Company, has been doing an immense business during the winter. Lumber, timber, shingles and other material for the use of the Company are being turned out in wonderful quantity. The mill and all its affairs are under the charge of Mr. Prescott, who probably has no superior in this line of business in the State. (Brainerd Tribune, 17 February 1872, p. 3, c. 2)

Heavy Ice Confirmed.


Mr. C. L. Remley has concluded his labors on the ice contract for the Headquarters Hotel. He took a contract from Mr. Lytle to deliver and store away in the finished ice building belonging to that institution 700 tons of ice, and during the past week has delivered about eighty tons daily. The ice was taken from the bosom of the Father of Waters, just below the saw-mill. Mr. Remley employed a large crew of men, and the ice was taken out after the most approved plan, great square chunks that required muscle to handle. The quality of ice taken out was No. 1, being clear as a crystal. Mr. R. expects to also close out his heavy tie contract this month, when he will have done a big winter’s work—70,000 ties and 700 tons of ice, giving employment to an immense crew of men at good wages, during the winter. (Brainerd Tribune, 17 February 1872, p. 3, c. 4)

24 February

THE MANAGEMENT OF THE NORTH-
ERN PACIFIC RAILROAD.
_____


Without referring in detail to the management on the part of all the executive officers having in charge the affairs of the Northern Pacific Railroad—which is admitted, east and west, to have been wise, economical, and successful to an almost unprecedented degree—we wish simply to refer to the manner in which the arduous duties of the Superintendent of the Minnesota Division have been discharged—claiming, as we do, to know something of the matter, from personal observation, and being fully conscious that any compliment we may be able to pay will fall far short of that which should in justice be paid to the accomplished, gallant and untiring officer to whom we refer.
There is probably not one person among ten thousand, even of intelligent men, who can realize or appreciate the mountains of difficulties which attend the organization and commencement of a great railroad enterprise even in countries where all the materials required to execute the work are right at hand, within an arm’s grasp of where they are needed to apply—to say nothing of so gigantic an undertaking as that of building the Northern Pacific Railroad, commencing in a wilderness, traversing an even inhabitless country, and ending, as it commenced, in a wilderness, ‘a thousand miles from anywhere.’ To even get prepared to commence such an enterprise as the one under consideration requires the very best executive ability and ripest experience on the part of the head of every department, and even then, to succeed, requires the general prevalence of harmony and good will among them. Upon no officer in the grand corps do the duties and responsibilities of organizing and carrying out the building and putting into operation of the first division of a railroad enterprise like this fall more heavily than upon the Superintendent. This is strictly true of the office of Superintendent alone; but when, as in the present instance, the brunt of labors and care of General Freight and Passenger Agent, Train Dispatcher, etc., etc., are tacked on to the office of Superintendent, how vast an increase of responsibility is added to the position which, has been so acceptably and gallantly filled for a year and a half by C. T. Hobart, Superintendent of the Minnesota Division of the Northern Pacific Railroad.

Mammoth Hotel built in 1883 by C. T. Hobart in Yellowstone Park, ca. Unknown.
Source: Unknown
This we say voluntarily, and without the knowledge of any one, and in so doing, simply wish to carry out one of the rules we long since adopted, of giving “honor to whom honor is due.” That Mr. Hobart has been made the subject, in many instances, whereon to vent wordy though petty spite, is not to be wondered at—as a saint occupying the prominent and three-fold position he has, would be subject to the same. But cases of complaint, throughout the administration of his multiplicity of duties, have been remarkably few, and what have been made are simply individual in character, and even they might easily be traced to either a malicious nature, jealousy or an overheated imagination. And now, after a trial of eighteen months in a place from the responsibilities of which many a strong heart would shrink, Mr. Hobart stands high and unsullied, both in the confidence and estimation of his superiors and the great public along his division of this continental thoroughfare. His accomplishments and sound ability in managing railway affairs, his courteous bearing toward his subordinates, and gentlemanly consideration of all the wants of the public, have come to be generally acknowledged and appreciated by the people throughout this country, from Duluth to the Red River of the North. (Brainerd Tribune, 24 February 1872, p. 2, c. 1)

NOTE: C. [Carroll] T. Hobart built the National Hotel [Mammoth Hotel] at the Mammoth Hot Springs in Yellowstone Park. The hotel opened in April 1883 with 141 rooms, it was completed in 1886 and dismantled in 1922.

SEE: 16 March 1872
SEE: 15 April 1872
SEE: 27 April 1872
SEE: 04 May 1872
SEE: 25 October 1872
SEE: 16 November 1872
SEE: 14 December 1872
SEE: 29 March 1873
SEE: 01 April 1873
SEE: 05 April 1873
SEE: 29 May 1873
SEE: 31 May 1873
SEE: 17 August 1882
SEE: 05 February 1917

Quite Ill.


We are pained to announce the almost serious illness of our esteemed citizen Mr. Prescott, who has charge of the Northern Pacific mills at this place. When we last heard from him he was no better, to speak of, and his many friends will anxiously await this result. (Brainerd Tribune, 24 February 1872, p. 3, c. 2)

THE NEW PASSENGER DEPOT AT
BRAINERD.
_____

Full Description of the Grand Structure.
_____

AN ARCHITECTURAL ORNAMENT TO
THE TOWN
_____

And a Credit to the Company.
_____

Northern Pacific Depot at the southeast corner of 6th and Washington, ca. 1872.
Source: Crow Wing County Historical Society
We have, from time to time during the past few weeks, heard fragmentary sentences in reference to the new Passenger Depot to be put up at Brainerd, and although from what we could gather, we were prepared to believe that at least we were to have quite a respectable structure, yet were not prepared to see so creditable a display of enterprise on the part of the Company as we now know is contemplated. We were shown in the the office of Lyman Bridges, the architect and builder of stations on the road, and Mr. Jas. H. Place, the complete designs, elevations, plans, etc., of the new depot executed by him, the properties of which we give below, to wit:
The building is to be 40x80, two stories high with attic. The style of architecture is Italian, with projecting turrets at each corner, 6x6, running high above the roof, and terminating with mansard roof and ornamented pinnacles, through which are to be ventilators from the closets and wash rooms of both stories below. The grand tower of the main front entrance to the building is 16x16, projecting six feet from the main part, and 60 feet from base to pinnacle, beautifully ornamented from the top of the building upward, with mansard roof, and great clock in front. The lower story is to be arranged thus: Entering the front through the main tower, you enter a hall 14x14; to one hand is the entrance to the ladies’ parlor, to the other the gents; out of this hall goes an easy and graceful stairway to the second story. On the first floor are the two passenger rooms, 32x39 each, a ticket and telegraph office in the center with openings into each of the passenger rooms, and two commodious fireproof vaults, 8x12. The passenger rooms will each be supplied with wash rooms and closets—in the corner turrets—provided and arranged after the most modern and improved style—the upper story being also provided in a like manner. Ascending from the front hall you come to an upper one similar in proportion, on the one side of which is the office of Geo. P. Lee, General Disbursing and Financial Agent of the N. P. R. R., and on the other the office of Col. John S. Loomis, General Land Commissioner of the road. These two offices are very similar in size and arrangement—being each 32x27 clear of private offices, vaults, closets, wash rooms, etc. In the center, between these two suites of rooms, and corresponding with the ticket and telegraph office below, is the office of Geo. W. Sweet, the attorney for the road and local law agent at Brainerd. The attic story will be lighted by dormer windows, and the building throughout the inside supported by ornamental iron columns. In front of the building, its full length, will be an overhanging protection, supported by immense brackets, and around the whole will be a finely constructed platform of ample space.
First Northern Pacific Depot, ca. 1913.
Source: Postcard
This building will compare, both in beauty and convenience, to any in the western country, and if executed in accordance with the plans we have examined will prove not only a mere ornament to our town but will alone enhance the value of real estate belonging to the Company in Brainerd, sufficiently to more than pay the whole expense. We, in common with every one else, are delighted to see that the Northern Pacific Company propose to go to work in a proper, and in the end, economical manner, in putting up, to start with, buildings that will serve a permanent purpose, enhance the beauty of their respective localities, as well as the value, instead of doing as many railroads have done, particularly in the past, of putting up buildings along their lines that would not make respectable “gin-mills” nor barns; rendering new buildings necessary almost before the road-bed had fairly settled. In every sense, worthy of consideration, we think that at the prominent points on the line similar buildings to the one in question should be built, and at all points be governed by principles of economy at first, not extravagance at last. (Brainerd Tribune, 24 February 1872, p. 3, c. 3)

SEE: 27 April 1872
SEE: 20 July 1872
SEE: 24 July 1872
SEE: 03 August 1872
SEE: 21 September 1872
SEE: 23 August 1883
SEE: 27 December 1883
SEE: 06 January 1884
SEE: 29 May 1885
SEE: 18 September 1885
SEE: 10 December 1886
SEE: 10 May 1889
SEE: 07 June 1889
SEE: 26 July 1889
SEE: 09 September 1892
SEE: 10 August 1894
SEE: 03 May 1895
SEE: 20 September 1895
SEE: 13 August 1897
SEE: 27 August 1897
SEE: 02 September 1898
SEE: 27 October 1899
SEE: 16 February 1900
SEE: 10 August 1900
SEE: 04 July 1901
SEE: 11 October 1901
SEE: 31 March 1902
SEE: 21 November 1902
SEE: 12 March 1907
SEE: 30 April 1910
SEE: 03 August 1911
SEE: 28 January 1913
SEE: 29 April 1913
SEE: 14 October 1913
SEE: 01 January 1914
SEE: 06 March 1914
SEE: 13 February 1915
SEE: 05 February 1917
SEE: 06 February 1917
SEE: 07 February 1917
SEE: 08 February 1917
SEE: 09 February 1917
SEE: 29 March 1917
SEE: 15 January 1919
SEE: 28 May 1919
SEE: 04 June 1919
SEE: 11 June 1919
SEE: 16 June 1919
SEE: 28 June 1919
SEE: 30 July 1919
SEE: 01 August 1919
SEE: 07 August 1919
SEE: 11 August 1919
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SEE: 07 October 1919
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SEE: 03 October 1921
SEE: 29 June 1968
SEE: 18 October 1968

“The Big Hotel.”


Headquarters Hotel located west of the first NP Depot, ca. 1872.
Source: Minnesota Historical Society
We were politely conducted, a few days since, over, through, around and beneath the “big hotel,” or Headquarters Hotel, as it is commonly called, by mine host, Mr. Wm. Lytle, of that institution. The new mammoth wing is about completed in all its parts, and the whole establishment—containing equivalent to three stories, and basement—with its necessary outbuildings, occupies something over two acres of ground. We cannot, for want of room, go into the details of the grand hotel—which has been built by the Company for the accommodation, strictly, of the heads of departments on the line, their families and friends—but will give only a few items, to show its capacity, and excellent management under the accomplished and thoroughly business administration of Mr. Lytle, who is one among the very few men who could successfully and acceptably hold the reins of government over so gigantic an institution.
There is room to comfortably seat at the table in the new dining-hall something over a hundred guests; there are between fifty and sixty beautifully arranged and commodious sleeping rooms, fitted up in rich and modern style, with all needed furniture, such as spring beds, wash-stands, mirrors, bureaus, clothes presses, etc., and all handsomely carpeted. Besides these and the dining-hall, are parlors, offices, promenades, an immense kitchen, cook and pastry rooms, large basement story and cellars, wash room, bedding presses, etc., all arranged and fitted up with every imagined article and appliance, for “speed, safety and comfort.” The whole building will be supplied with water, by pipes leading from an elevated reservoir to all rooms in the house. The ice-house—containing 700 tons of the congealed fluid—is wonderfully convenient and was planned by Mr. Lytle himself, and for genuine utility goes ahead of anything we ever noticed. There are several small rooms along the side of the building, entered by as many doors. These rooms are constructed so that a heavy body of ice surrounds them on every side and over head—rendering the necessity of keeping ice in the rooms with the meats, etc., wholly unnecessary. The butter and milk room is distinct, as is the meat room and the other rooms for containing various articles, giving no chance whatever of one article flavoring the other; and the extraordinary convenience of the whole is remarkable. Notwithstanding the many fine chimneys in the hotel, there are now in use more than six hundred joints of stove-pipe. Mr. Lytle’s management of this hotel is marked for its economy, courtesy and thorough business properties, rendering him deservedly popular both with the guests under his care and the public at large. (Brainerd Tribune, 24 February 1872, p. 3, c. 4)

News and Cigar Stand.


Master Jimmy Lytle, in the office of the Headquarters Hotel keeps a very neat and fully supplied cigar-stand and news depot. His cigars are No. 1 in quality, and Jimmy is always on hand to supply the wants of all lovers of a choice Havana. Give him a call. (Brainerd Tribune, 24 February 1872, p. 3, c. 1)

29 February

A Princely Present to General Ira
Spaulding.


General Ira Spaulding, Northern Pacific Chief Engineer, ca. 1865.
Source: Unknown
General Ira Spaulding, Chief Engineer of the Minnesota Division of the Northern Pacific Railroad, was made the recipient of a present by his noble Corps of assistant engineers who have been with him during the discharge of the important and laborious duties attached to his elevated position, the character of which is well calculated to convey to him the warm feelings and esteem entertained by the givers.
The General’s mission hither in the capacity of Chief Engineer, has ended—the line is now complete. We take the following from the Duluth Herald, and fully endorse the references made to General Spaulding, and could even say more of him, but we forbear.
“Amongst the men whose exertions have greatly helped to stretch the iron rails westward from Duluth, no one is deserving of more honorable mention than General Ira Spaulding, Chief Engineer of the Minnesota Division of the Northern Pacific. To him belongs the credit of having engineered and completed the first great division of the line; and it affords us unfeigned satisfaction to inform our readers that, in connection with his work in that direction, one of those pleasant episodes in life which renders existence on this mundane sphere unusually agreeable has lately transpired. It gives us much satisfaction to be able to lay before our patrons a few of the particulars connected therewith, which are as follows:
It being known to the various assistant civil engineers who have been engaged on Gen. S.’s corps that their chief, having successfully accomplished the arduous duty of laying out the pathway for and completing that part of the great northern trans-continental line extending from Lake Superior to the Red-River-of-the-North, was about to resign his position, they, with one accord, determined to associate with his act of retiracy some manifestation of their appreciation of not only the goodness of his head and heart but also of his ability. Without unnecessary clamor and in so quiet a way that even their most intimate friends and acquaintances—as well as those prying fellows, the newspaper men,—were kept in the dark as to their motives, the engineers in question contributed the necessary funds and ordered for presentation to General Spaulding a valuable evidence of their good-will and consideration for his untiring zeal and uniformly clever deportment toward them.
The token tendered, in so delicate and touching a manner by his earnest and sincere assistants to Gen. S., is one of which he may well be proud. It consists of a magnificent massive-cased gold pendant-winding watch, with the finest nickel movement; plain heavy vest chain, with seal; plain heavy neck chain, and a very handsome weighty moss-agate ring, made in Paris expressly for the purpose. The watch, which was manufactured by the U. S. Watch Co., bears the following inscription:

A TOKEN OF REGARD TO OUR CHIEF ENGINEER,

GENERAL IRA SPAULDING,

From his Assistants on Minnesota Division

N. P. R. R.

February 29, 1872.


General Thomas L. Rosser, Northern Pacific Principal Assistant engineer to General Spaulding, ca. 1865.
Source: Unknown
Col. Wm. B. Gaw, Engineer-in-Charge of the Duluth Docks and Harbor Improvements of the Company, having been appointed a committee to tender Gen. S. the rare gift, (Which had previously been secured in New York by Gen. Thos. L. Rosser, formerly Gen. S.’s Principal Assistant and now Chief Engineer of the Dakota Division,) on the 21st inst., transmitted the articles, through M. C. Kimberley, Esq., with the following kind and feeling letter:

NORTHERN PACIFIC RAILROAD,
Duluth Docks and Harbor Improvements,
DULUTH, March 20, 1872.

General Ira Spaulding, Chief Engineer Min-
nesota Division Northern Pacific Railroad:


DEAR GENERAL—The undersigned, appointed a committee on behalf of the Civil Engineers of the Minnesota and Dakota Divisions of the Northern Pacific Railroad, to present you with a slight testimonial of their esteem, in view of your retirement from the active duties of the profession, and the termination of your connection with the road, transmits herewith, through M. C. Kimberley, C. E., the accompanying souvenir, which you are requested to accept as a token of the good-will and respect ever entertained toward you by the Civil Engineers under your command.
Your uniform courteous demeanor toward them (the zeal displayed by you in the prosecution of the great enterprise with which you have been identified as a pioneer engineer from the time when the first stake of the line was stuck at the head of Lake Superior until the final completion of your division and the waters of the Red-River-of-the-North were reached by the iron rail) your acknowledged integrity and professional attainments made us the more to regret the severing of ties which have so long bound us together in professional duty.
Hoping that your future career may be as pleasant as the past has been successful, I am, very respectfully, yours, &c.,

Wm. B. GAW,
Engineer-in-Charge.


Eng. Kimberley having performed, on the 21st, the agreeable task assigned him, Gen. Spaulding acknowledged his deep sense of gratitude for the honor conferred in the subjoined reply to Col. Gaw’s communication:

NORTHERN PACIFIC RAILROAD, MINN. DIV.,
Engineer Department,
BRAINERD, Minn., March 25, 1872.


DEAR COLONEL—I am in receipt of your note of the 20th inst., accompanying the beautiful “souvenir” sent me by you through Mr. Kimberley on behalf of the Civil Engineers of the Minnesota and Dakota Divisions, Northern Pacific Railroad.
These “Tokens of Regard” from my late assistants, and the kindly sentiments conveyed to me in your letter on their behalf, have touched me deeply. No man was ever more ably or generously seconded by his assistants than I have been on this line, or more fortunate in having associated with him men worthy of affectionate regard and esteem.
To you, my dear Colonel, and to all those gentlemen whom you represent, I wish a most happy and prosperous future, and I feel sure that, like all good engineers, your greatest reward for severe labors and privations, will be the assured success and prosperity of the great enterprise to which you are devoting all your energies and the best years of your lives.

Sincerely, yours,
I. SPAULDING,
COL. W. B. GAW, Eng’r-in-charge, &c.”

(Brainerd Tribune, 06 April 1872, p. 4, c.’s 1 & 2)

SEE: 22 June 1872
SEE: 14 December 1872
SEE: 02 October 1875

NOTE: General Thomas L. Rosser and Dr. John Carper Rosser, NP surgeon, were brothers and came to Minnesota together. Dr. Rosser was one of Brainerd’s first physicians and lived in Brainerd for over twenty years. He was responsible for treating the victims of the NP bridge collapse in 1875.

SEE: 14 December 1871

SEE: 20 July 1872
SEE: 25 October 1872
SEE: 26 October 1872
SEE: 14 February 1873
SEE: 01 March 1873
SEE: 18 March 1873
SEE: 02 August 1873
SEE: 23 August 1873
SEE: 25 October 1873
SEE: 15 April 1876
SEE: 22 July 1876
SEE: 28 October 1876

SEE: 06 January 1877
SEE: 17 March 1877
SEE: 25 April 1877
SEE: 30 April 1877
SEE: 05 May 1877
SEE: 12 May 1877
SEE: 17 May 1877
SEE: 26 May 1877
SEE: 06 June 1877
SEE: 21 July 1877
SEE: 11 August 1877
SEE: 29 August 1877
SEE: 15 September 1877
SEE: 25 October 1877
SEE: 08 November 1877
SEE: 22 December 1877
SEE: 26 February 1878
SEE: 15 June 1878
SEE: 06 July 1878
SEE: 17 August 1878
SEE: 24 August 1878
SEE: 23 January 1879
SEE: 25 January 1879
SEE: 11 March 1879
SEE: 15 March 1879
SEE: 05 April 1879
SEE: 12 April 1879
SEE: 24 May 1879
SEE: 06 December 1879
SEE: 13 December 1879
SEE: 27 December 1879

01 March
Congress passes legislation establishing Yellowstone National Park.

02 March

Progress of the Car Shops.


Northern Pacific Shops and Offices, ca. 1875.
Source: Minnesota Historical Society
The progress being made in the construction of the great car shops at this place, is of the most flattering nature. We visited the scene of operations a few days since, and after seeing what had been done in the space of a few weeks, we cannot refrain from complimenting Chief of Construction Cruikshanks and his gallant crew of artists upon the good management and splendid progress so evident. There has been no squandering of time nor “wood-butchering” done there; the great structure stands out in its immense proportions, a type of architectural and mechanical perfection, and is as graceful in appearance as a swan upon the water. The other two buildings which are sixty by sixty feet each, and a part and parcel of the whole, are also fast approaching an upright position. These two, with the grand main building, the roundhouse and tank, cover a large area of ground, and with the two or three score of residences that are to be built in the vicinity of these works, will of themselves make a village of no mean pretensions in size and respectable appearance. Some idea of the extent of the car-works may be had when we state that in the main building alone there are some 200,000 feet of lumber, and we have been informed by railroad men that the structure is the largest of its character anywhere west of Albany, New York. (Brainerd Tribune, 02 March 1872, p. 3, c. 2)

09 March

THE GREAT PACIFIC ROADS.
_____


From the Philadelphia Press.
Under the management of Jay Cooke the financial foundation of the Northern Pacific seems to be already firmly established. During two days alone last week the sales of bonds in this country have amounted to two hundred and thirty-nine thousand dollars, and the sales of the month of January foot up to a million and a half. This, exclusive of the European market, where several million have been placed this year. These figures, however enormous, have a solid basis, and do not infer inflation or speculation. A moment’s thought will convince anyone that the railway figures of the future must far exceed anything so far known in this country and this because as yet we are living merely in one corner of it, and our operations are on a contracted scale. The territorial area of all New England and the Middle States is not quite 200,000 square miles. The area of the United States Territories, not including Alaska, is 1,100,000 square miles, over five times as great. Now, these Territories are the domain of our Pacific Railways. If our little corner has built up and sustained the Pennsylvania, the Reading, the Erie, the Central and the late Camden and Amboy, and a dozen of other great lines, what will be the future of these great Pacific roads, whose territory is so much richer, more populous, and powerful? (Brainerd Tribune, 09 March 1872, p. 2, c. 2)

Wrecking Car.


A handsomely fitted up car, built for the purpose of clearing away wrecked trains, arrived here last week and did its first work of clearing up and bringing in the wrecked portion of the train that was “demoralized” three miles east of here three months ago. (Brainerd Tribune, 09 March 1872, p. 3, c. 1)

16 March

New Engines.


An occasional new engine for the Northern Pacific bears down upon us from the east, and comes dancing into Brainerd with all the gaiety of a new and beautiful machine, such as a first-class locomotive only is. One was sent on the road a few days ago, which makes twenty-two locomotives now on the road, besides the two that were sent to the west and to be used on the finished section of 27 miles between Kalma and Wala-Wala. There is no superfluity of engines here, however, as we learn that Superintendent Hobart has to use his best ingenuity to furnish motive power even now for the immense business that has been to do since the road was opened through to Red River. (Brainerd Tribune, 16 March 1872, p. 3, c. 2)

SEE: 24 February 1872
SEE: 15 April 1872
SEE: 27 April 1872
SEE: 04 May 1872
SEE: 25 October 1872
SEE: 16 November 1872
SEE: 14 December 1872
SEE: 29 March 1873
SEE: 01 April 1873
SEE: 05 April 1873
SEE: 29 May 1873
SEE: 31 May 1873
SEE: 17 July 1880
SEE: 17 August 1882
SEE: 05 February 1917


23 March

BRIDGE OVER THE MISSISSIPPI, AT BRAINERD, MINNESOTA,
NORTHERN PACIFIC RAILWAY 1872


NP Bridge newly completed, 23 March 1872.
Source: Scientific American, Volume XXVI, Number 13, New York
Our engraving is a fine view of one of the bridges of the Northern Pacific Railway, a work which is now being pushed with energy, and is destined to become a most important artery of commerce. The bridge is, we think, the northern-most of all the bridges that cross the great Mississippi, which, at this point, however, is a narrow and easily spanned stream.
The bridge, in itself, has no peculiar points calculated specially to interest engineers. It is of plain trestlework, yet over it will pass an enormous traffic; and as a view of one of the features of a magnificent enterprise, our engraving possesses interest.
The road follows a natural line of commerce, which must, in time, develop into something enormous. It penetrates a region remarkably productive, into which civilization is crowding even in advance of the construction of the railway. This country has been appropriately called the “Garden Region” of the North. As a wheat producing region, it is probably unsurpassed anywhere, and fruits, of nearly all the kinds natural to the temperate zone, thrive in the mild climate of its luxuriant valleys.
All the elements of prosperity exist in the territory which will supply the road with traffic, namely, Minnesota, Dakota, Montana, Idaho, Oregon, Washington, and a part of Wisconsin, and a brilliant future for this work cannot be regarded as doubtful.
According to statement of Messrs. Jay Cooke & Co., (25 December 1871) this road is now completed across the State of Minnesota, 255 miles, from Duluth to Fargo, on the Red River of the North, and trains are running regularly. The Dakota division, extending 200 miles westward, from the crossing of the Red River to the crossing of the Missouri in central Dakota, is now under construction, and contracted to be finished July 1, 1872. In the meantime, a section of 65 miles is building between the Columbia river and Puget Sound, in Washington Territory, where track laying is progressing.
The Northern Pacific company, in order to remove hurtful rivalry and secure early and direct connection with the St. Paul, Chicago, and the East, recently purchased the main line and branch of the St. Paul and Pacific road. During the past year the main line has been completed, through an excellent country, to Breckenridge on the Red River. At the same time the branch has been extended from its late terminus at St. Cloud, 65 miles northward, to Brainerd, where it joins, and becomes tributary to, the trunk line of the Northern Pacific.
Jay Cooke, financier of the NP Railroad, ca. 1870.
Source: Unknown
Finally, contracts have been let for the construction of a branch road (to be technically known as the St. Vincent Extension of the St. Paul & Pacific Railroad), from St. Cloud, 375 miles, to Pembina, near the northwestern corner of Minnesota, and on the border of the British Province of Manitoba. This is to be completed before the close of 1872. It will drain the richest portion of the Red River valley and open direct communication with the British settlements of Winnipeg and the productive valley of the Saskatchewan. It will also serve as the southeastern arm of the Northern Pacific road, reaching to St. Paul and Minneapolis.
At this date, the Northern Pacific company own, by construction and purchase, 640 miles of finished road. The completion of the above named contracts will give the company, at the close of 1872, more than 900 miles of completed track in the prosperous State of Minnesota alone, and 1165 miles altogether; it will carry the trunk line nearly one third of its distance across the continent, and bring to it the large and profitable traffic of Montana and the Government transportation of the Upper Missouri. The Hudson’s Bay Company have already leased wharves and warehouse at Duluth, preparatory to doing the whole of their large business over the Northern Pacific line. Nearly two million acres of the company’s lands in Minnesota are ready for sale, and many thousand have been sold to colonies and settlers, who are moving to the line of the road in gratifying numbers. (Scientific American, Volume XXVI, Number 13, New York, 23 March 1872)

Lumber of all kinds, and shingles can be had now at the [N. P.] mill down at the river in quantities to suit purchasers—a fact that is pretty fully appreciated by our citizens.
Mr. A. D. Prescott, who lay sick so long has so far recovered as to be able to ride out, and hopes soon to be at his post again. (Brainerd Tribune, 23 March 1872, p. 3, c. 1)

Brotherhood of Locomotive Engineers.


We are very much pleased to learn that a Division of the order known as the Brotherhood of Locomotive Engineers is to be organized in Brainerd; and that the Brotherhood also contemplate building a fine hall for their use. Those foremost in this noble work are Mr. John Fulton and John Heach, two as thorough gentlemen and finished machinists as this country can boast. They are both engineers on the Northern Pacific, who rank high in the estimation of the Company, and are universally respected along the line of the road. They have taken hold of the work of organizing a Division here with commendable zeal and energy, and we are pleased to know that outside of meeting with encouragement among the members of the order, our leading citizens generally are lending substantial aid in the furtherance of the object. We know of this order our self, a good deal; we had the honor of one time reporting the proceedings of a national convention of the Brotherhood, where delegates were present from every part of the United States. The opportunity we had of informing our self in regard to the character of the institution was good, and we, with all others, pronounced it an order of the highest type, with objects as pure and noble as man is capable of comprehending. No institution, secular in kind, could lend more dignity nor bestow a better influence in the community that a Division of the Brotherhood, and we sincerely hope they may be generously assisted by all our good citizens and that their plans in getting a thorough organization in Brainerd may prove more than successful. (Brainerd Tribune, 23 March 1872, p. 3, c. 4)

31 March
A big Easter Dinner was given the guests at the Headquarters Hotel last Sunday by mine host, Mr. Lytle. Egg was miscellaneously considered, and the dinner as a whole could discount Delmonico’s and beat it on the first round. (Brainerd Tribune, 06 April 1872, p. 1, c. 5)

01 April

Theatrical.


Master Jo. H. Lytle [sic] and Jimmy Lytle had their second entertainment last Monday, at the Headquarters Hotel, and it passed off splendidly. It consisted of charades, songs, tableaux, and dancing. Jimmy Lytle, in the song, “Girl with a Roguish Eye,” gave us a good clog dance. Jo. H. Linsley appeared as Nilsson in the song “Up in Das Palloon,” and did exceedingly well. Miss Fannie E. Linsley appeared as a Gypsy, in a tableaux, and did very well; also Miss Clara Lytle, in the character of a young lady in the same tableaux. They propose to give us another entertainment in three or four weeks, which they think will be better. (Brainerd Tribune, 06 April 1872, p. 1, c. 4)

06 April

NP Machine Shops, Frank Jay Haynes, 1877.
Source: Haynes Foundation, Montana Historical Society
The machinery for the grand Railroad Machine Shops at this place has been received, and is rapidly being placed into position by a large corps of workmen under the leadership of that excellent gentleman and accomplished machinist, Master-Mechanic W. M. Davie. Over sixty tons of machinery has been received, and we understand that the manufacture of box and flat cars is to be gone into extensively. The temporary repair shops of the road at Homoko [sic] have been brought hither and absorbed by the big shops here. (Brainerd Tribune, 06 April 1872, p. 1, c. 5)

Another new engine has arrived for the Northern Pacific. She is “No. 40,” and handsome as a picture. (Brainerd Tribune, 06 April 1872, p. 1, c. 5)

13 April
We are indebted to John M. Fulton, Esq., for a copy of the Monthly Journal, (published by the Brotherhood of Locomotive Engineers at Cleveland, Ohio,) for the present month. It is full of good and interesting reading for all, and must be of especial interest to all locomotive engineers. (Brainerd Tribune, 13 April 1872, p. 1, c. 5)

Appointments for the N. P. Railroad.


From the Pioneer we learn that Mr. Charles W. Mead, of Omaha, President of the Omaha Smelting Works, has been appointed General Superintendent of the Northern Pacific Railroad, and will enter upon his duties on the 15th inst. Mr. Mead is a prominent railroad man, and for several years was Assistant General Superintendent of the Union Pacific Railroad.
Also that Mr. J. S. Sherman, the well known landscape gardener, and, until the great fire, the Superintendent of Parks in Chicago, has been appointed chief of the Agricultural and Horticultural Bureau of the Northern Pacific road. He arrived in this city on Monday, and leaves this morning for a trip over the Northern Pacific. Mr. Sherman expressed considerable surprise at seeing farmers all through the southern part of this State sowing wheat. He says the frost is nearer out of the ground in Minnesota than it is in northern Illinois, and the season farther advanced. (Brainerd Tribune, 13 April 1872, p. 1, c. 3)

Boston Colony.


The advance guard of the coming Colony that is to settle at Detroit Lake[s]—ninety-one miles west of this place on the Northern Pacific Road—has arrived in the form of some forty or fifty members thereof. They are nearly all heads of families, and come thus early in the season, in order to get in a spring crop. The grand body will be along in a few weeks, which will probably be composed of over a thousand persons great and small. It is almost strictly New England in its cast, and will be composed of first class citizens. They are coming to a choice country, and we hope every blessing may attend them in their efforts to secure to themselves comfortable and independent homes. (Brainerd Tribune, 13 April 1872, p. 1, c. 3)

Mail Service on the N. P. R. R.


We are happy to record the fact that we are to have hereafter, mail service on the Northern Pacific line from Duluth to Moorehead [sic]—dating from the 10th inst. Every body along the route will also be glad, for the absence of it had become a grievance, almost sore in its character. Conductor Sherwood had the honor of bringing the first mail over the road on Wednesday last, and acted, we believe, in the double capacity of conductor and mail agent. (Brainerd Tribune, 13 April 1872, p. 1, c. 4)

The following names for Stations along the line of the Northern Pacific Railroad have been permanently adopted in place of those now in use, to wit:
Withington [Deerwood], for Reno.
Motley, for Welwood.
Aldrich, for Lindel.
Perham, for Negawnoma.
Anthon, for Milton.
Lake Side, for Marion.
Hawley, for Bethel.
Glyndon, for St. P. & Pac. Junc. with N. P. R. R.
The above change “reminds us of a little story.” A waiter brought a guest a piece of very rare meat. The guest asked what he called that. “Rare beef,” replied the waiter. “Well,” replied the guest, “just take it back and ‘rare’ it again.” And that’s the the way we feel about the “change.” (Brainerd Tribune, 13 April 1872, p. 1, c. 5)

15 April

Description of the Country on the Line of the
Northern Pacific Railroad.


BRAINERD, April 15, 1872.

EDITOR OF THE TRIBUNE—Permit me through the columns of your valuable paper to call attention to some observations made in a recent trip over the N. P. R. R., on the very substantial manner of the structure, easy grades, and the wonderful richness and fertility characterizing the major portion the Land Grant. As far out into Dakota as your observer went, after crossing the Red River, I think I never passed through a country excelling this in point of latent fertility. The beautiful spring-like appearance of that broad expanse of virgin soil, soon by the genial sun to be decked like a bride in her wedding garments awaiting the coming of the husbandman, charmed the eye and filled the mind with visions of the teeming productions which ere long will reward the pioneers over in that Promised Land.
What has been said of the lands on the further side of the Red River is no less true of those between the Buffalo and the Red. After a quarter of a century spent upon the prairies of Illinois, Iowa, Kansas and Nebraska in close observations, I am prepared to say that no more fertile or inviting field was ever opened to the occupancy of man.

General T. L. Rosser’s surveyors’ camp at Fargo, Spring 1872.
Source: Caswell & Davy, Duluth, MN
At Fargo, where the road crosses the Red River, an imposing and substantial bridge is being pushed rapidly forward to completion. At Moorehead [sic], immediately opposite on the Minnesota side, where the new depot buildings are now already up, preparatory to the reception of the traffic for Manitoba and the great Saskatchewan valley, and the wondrous fur trade of the North, I found the people alive to their best interests, efficiently guided by the experience of my old friend and townsman Col. John W. Taylor, who has located, I think, as much land in the Northwest as any other man living.
A large number of settlers have already arrived, and as fast as lumber can be procured are nestling themselves into happy homes. The town now gives evidence of the great city that ere long must arise at the head of navigation of the Amazon of the Northwest.
At the new town of Glyndon where the St. Vincent branch crosses the Northern Pacific, all was life and activity. Claim taking and house building marked the commencement of what cannot fail to be at no distant day an important junction of two great thoroughfares. The gentlemanly and affable Land Agent of the Company at this point, Mr. Nettleton, is on the ground determined to make it one of the finest settlements on the line of the Road.
Coming up the valley of the Buffalo the same inherent richness of the soil is everywhere strikingly manifest. Approaching the timber at Oak Lake, numerous farms are seen, already opened. The topography of this immediate neighborhood is singularly beautiful in its undulations, and its timber skirted lakes. At the next station, Detroit Lake[s], I had an opportunity of witnessing the operation of the enterprising and successful Boston Colony, that started in last year under the lead of Capt. Roberts. Truly they are doing great things. Already are they engaged in manufacturing to supply the wants of the rapidly developing country.
Continuing on the way, one is struck by the easy gradients and the absence of those sharp and dangerous curves so common to many roads.
NP bridge on the Brainerd line, ca. 1872.
Source: Crow Wing County Historical Society
Returning to your hospitable town of Brainerd, I felt I could exclaim “Now have mine eyes seen the glory of the coming of the Lord in opening up this country so vast and varied in its resources.” Think me not inclined to flatter, when I say that no town on the line of the Road presents more attractive features or impresses one more with a sense of its future greatness, than yours. Being the first harbor for the lumber borne upon the sweeping current of the Mississippi, it must supply mainly the prairies of the West with this indispensably necessary article. Already has the energetic and worthy contractor, Lyman Bridges, in process of construction fifty Station Houses, of the latest style of architecture, made from material obtained here. The lumber trade alone must add largely to your resources, and the freight receipts of this magnificent new Road so ably superintended by that efficient and popular gentleman, C. T. Hobart, Esq.
Another element of your prosperity is to be found in the elaborate and elegant R. R. machine and car shops erected here. Here also is the head centre of the officers of the Minnesota Division, and from this point radiates the authority that guides and controls it. Between here and Duluth that portion of the Grant not covered by valuable growth of timber is admirably adapted for meadow lands and the growth of cranberries. Perhaps no fruit enters more generally into consumption by the American people of this day, than the profitable cranberry.
Everywhere was the question asked me, “Is this country adapted to horticulture?” I answer most emphatically, “Yes.” All the Russian varieties of apples, those denominated “Iron clads” will thrive and produce well, and all this region as a stock country presents great inducements.
Fearing, however, that I have already wearied your patience, for which my enthusiasm at what I have seen must be my apology, I subscribe myself, as an agriculturist and horticulturist.
Yours truly,
J. S. SHERMAN.
(Brainerd Tribune, 20 April 1872, p. 1, c. 4)

SEE: 24 February 1872
SEE: 16 March 1872
SEE: 27 April 1872
SEE: 04 May 1872
SEE: 25 October 1872
SEE: 16 November 1872
SEE: 14 December 1872
SEE: 29 March 1873
SEE: 01 April 1873
SEE: 05 April 1873
SEE: 29 May 1873
SEE: 31 May 1873

SEE: 17 July 1880

SEE: 17 August 1882
SEE: 05 February 1917


20 April
TO LEAVE US.—Mr. J. S. Campbell, who has, since our residence here, held a prominent position in connection with the Railroad, contemplates leaving Brainerd in a few weeks and going to Glyndon, out near the Red River, as we are informed. We regret this fact very much indeed, as we had come to know our friend Campbell and his excellent wife as being among our most thoroughly valuable and esteemed citizens. We understand Mr. C. intends engaging in business at Glyndon, and if so he carries with him the best wishes of our citizens. We propose to “press him in” as one of our regular correspondents in the west, as we are bound to make the TRIBUNE a local paper, in every sense possible, for all the country and towns along the N. P. Railroad from here to Puget Sound. (Brainerd Tribune, 20 April 1872, p. 1, c. 3)

PERSONAL.—We had the great pleasure of receiving a call this week from Major Sherman, of Rockford, Illinois. Major Sherman is the gentleman who is to assume the position of Superintendent of the agricultural and horticultural department of the N. P. Railroad; and judging from what we know of his reputation, and from an extended conversation with him on topics kindred to this valuable enterprise, we feel sure that the Company have, in selecting him for this position, been peculiarly fortunate. His long experience throughout all the western country, in agricultural and horticultural enterprises, his observing turn of mind and his general fund of knowledge, eminently qualify him to under take and successfully carry out the important work of demonstrating to the world, by practical test, the perfect adaptability of the country along the line of the Northern Pacific, from one end to the other, to the purposes of agriculture, horticulture, and stock raising. We shall speak more at length in future issues upon the plan which has been adopted to represent this great country as one of the very richest among the countries of the producing world, and can promise in advance—from what we know our self, and have learned from others—something new under the sun in the way of producing wealth from the soil. Major Sherman had just returned from a tour of observation along the line of the road clear into Dakota; the result of his observations on this trip we publish to day, and warmly recommend the communication he has so kindly furnished us to the careful perusal of our many readers, as a reliable statement of facts, put forward in a most readable shape. (Brainerd Tribune, 20 April 1872, p. 1, c. 3)

27 April
Brainerd—Mr. Charles W. Mead, who has recently been appointed General Manager of the “Department of the East,” on the N. P. R. R., arrived here on Saturday last. For the present his Department will extend from Duluth to the Missouri River, over which Mr. Mead will have the general management. As we understand his position neither does apply, nor conflicts with the position so long and ably filled by Mr. Hobart as the Minnesota Division Superintendent. General Manager Mead will make Brainerd his headquarters, which is another feather in Brainerd’s bonnet, and the insertion of another peg by those dubious persons is now in order. We had forgotten to say, also, that all interesting railroads—branches of the Northern Pacific—will likewise come under his administration, and all employees will report to Minn. and be governed by his orders. (Brainerd Tribune, 27 April 1872, p. 1, c. 4)

SEE: 24 February 1872
SEE: 16 March 1872
SEE: 15 April 1872
SEE: 04 May 1872
SEE: 25 October 1872
SEE: 16 November 1872
SEE: 14 December 1872
SEE: 29 March 1873
SEE: 01 April 1873
SEE: 05 April 1873
SEE: 29 May 1873
SEE: 31 May 1873

SEE: 17 July 1880

SEE: 17 August 1882
SEE: 05 February 1917


THE NEW DEPOT.—Stakes were driven this week for the magnificent new passenger depot described in the TRIBUNE a few months ago, and a crew of workmen are now employed in getting out the timber for it. This will be a beautiful ornament to our town, and of a character that would do credit to any city, great or small. So must it be. (Brainerd Tribune, 27 April 1872, p. 1, c. 4)

RAILROAD TURN-OVER.—The western bound train on Saturday evening last, met with an accident some twenty miles east of here, which, although somewhat extensive, did but little damage—to what might have been done, had it been one of the “bad kind.” The accident, we understand, was caused by the spreading of the rails, and four cars were thrown from the track and rolled over on their sides—the passenger coach, express car and two box cars. They were dragged some ways, ere the train could be stopped, but owing to the soft, sandy character of the ground, they were not badly damaged. There were a great many people on the train, and it seems almost miraculous that there were no fatal results. Quite a number of persons were scratched and bruised, in the general roll and tumble; the severest case that came to our notice was that of Express Messenger Pomeroy, who, in the general wrestle with the boxes and barrels of his car, had his ankle quite severely sprained. A wrecking car was sent up on Sunday morning, and the truant cars were brought into camp. (Brainerd Tribune, 27 April 1872, p. 1, c. 4)

01 May
The Northern Pacific leases the Lake Superior and Mississippi Railroad.

04 May
A WORKER.—One of the hardest workers, and most energetic men of this section of country, is Supt. C. T. Hobart. His head and hands are apparently unceasing in the labors incident to his position, and it has become the general remark that he can do more things at the same time than one in a thousand. He has a pleasant word for all, both high and low, answers a thousand inquiries every day and yet finds time to clearly discharge the work of his place with the nicest precision. The business and responsibilities of the Road are increasing with the most wonderful rapidity and to carry out the details of its management and increasing wants, requires the clearest head and best of calculation as well as physical endurance of the first order. Mr. Hobart, fortunately for both himself and the best interests of the company, possesses these indispensables to the fullest degree; and he discharges with wonderful reliability here and seems to us would speedily swamp most of mortals. (Brainerd Tribune, 04 May 1872, p. 1, c. 4)

SEE: 24 February 1872
SEE: 16 March 1872
SEE: 15 April 1872
SEE: 27 April 1872
SEE: 25 October 1872
SEE: 16 November 1872
SEE: 14 December 1872
SEE: 29 March 1873
SEE: 01 April 1873
SEE: 05 April 1873
SEE: 29 May 1873
SEE: 31 May 1873

SEE: 17 July 1880

SEE: 17 August 1882
SEE: 05 February 1917


The mammoth engine in the machine and car shops was set in motion on Wednesday last by Master Mechanic Davie, and worked with all the precision and nicety of greased lightning in a tar barrel. The array of beautiful and massive machinery in the main building is a sight to behold; when the whole catalogue gets into operation a visit to the gigantic establishment over which Mr. Davie so skillfully presides, will be a treat rarely met with. This is the largest in situation, and certainly finest appearing of the kind west of Albany, New York. Mr. Foss, of the south Duluth firm of LaVaque & Foss, did the painting on the great buildings, and he may well refer to these with pride. (Brainerd Tribune, 04 May 1872, p. 1, c. 4)

The Duluth Herald pays the following well merited compliment to Mr. Mead, the new General Manager of the N. P. Road, which judging from what we have seen and know of the gentleman, we freely endorse.
“General Superintendent Mead, although lately appointed to the responsible position he now fills so creditably, has already made hosts of friends in Duluth and along the entire length of the N. P. While strictly attending to his arduous duties he at the same time acts in so courteous a manner to all with whom he comes in contact as to win their respect and their esteem. Indeed he is one of the the most popular men on our great northern trans-continental-thoroughfare.” (Brainerd Tribune, 04 May 1872, p. 1, c. 5)

The Railroad Company are about erecting waterworks at the river near this end of the bridge. The water will be raised by an engine into an immense reservoir, and by a pipe will supply all the buildings of the company, including the machine and car shops, a mile above Headquarters. (Brainerd Tribune, 04 May 1872, p. 1, c. 5)

08 May

The Northern Pacific and its Branches.


THE following important order has been issued by General Manager Mead, relative to the Northern Pacific and its leased lines, or branches:

OFFICE OF GENERAL MANAGER
BRAINERD, Minn., May 8, 1872.

The Northern Pacific R. R. Co., have assumed control of the Lake Superior and Mississippi R. R., together with its Leased Lines, consisting of the Stillwater and St. Paul, Minneapolis and Duluth Railroads, and Minneapolis and St. Louis Railway, these Roads will embrace and be hereafter called the Lake Superior and Mississippi Division of the Northern Pacific R. R.
W. W. Hungerford is appointed Superintendent of this Division, with Headquarters at St. Paul.
C. W. MEAD,
General Manager
(Brainerd Tribune, 18 May 1872, p. 1, c. 5)

11 May

Thomas H. Canfield, President, Lake Superior and Puget Sound Land Company, a subsidiary of the Northern Pacific Railroad, ca. Unknown.
Source: Unknown
PERSONAL.—President Thomas H. Canfield, President of the Lake Superior and Puget Sound Land Company, with headquarters at 120 Broadway, New York, has been with us in Brainerd during the past week. His tour hither has been purely of a business character, and he has visited all points on the line from Duluth to Red River, looking after the interests of the great Company of which he is the head. Mr. Canfield, though of course keeping posted in regard to the advance of Brainerd as well as one could, not to have been here, was agreeably surprised with the expanded proportions of our town, and the character of the improvements made since his last visit hither. And right here, we feel disposed to say, that he must have taken in at a glance the wisdom and foresight of Mr. Lyman P. White, the Brainerd Town-site Agent, in the fine disposition of real estate so as to inure to the highest degree beneficial both to the purchasers and the company he has so industriously and efficiently represented. We hope he may be, as he no doubt has and will be, complimented by his superiors in this Land Department in more ways than one; for, while he is most industrious and far sighted in the interest of the company he represents, he has endeared himself with our people by his many acts of good hearted benevolence, and his name has actually become a household word in every family of our new and flourishing community.
Mr. Canfield’s trip in this direction will, we feel sure, have a happy effect in giving renewed energy on the part of the people all along the line, and we hope he may visit us as often as his business matters will permit. (Brainerd Tribune, 11 May 1872, p. 1, c. 5)

Mr. R. W. Chase, has been appointed the General Freight Agent of the Northern Pacific Railroad, with headquarters at this place. Mr. Chase is an eastern man, we believe, and has held important positions in the Railroad world in New England. From our acquaintance with Mr. C., we feel sure the interests of the Company in this highly important department will be closely watched and popularly handled; for outside his thorough business qualifications, Mr. Chase is an agreeable, courteous gentleman. (Brainerd Tribune, 11 May 1872, p. 1, c. 5)

The Northern Pacific Manufacturing Company.


The Northern Pacific Manufacturing Company in addition to the two fine saw mills now in operation, will soon have a mammoth planing mill in working condition, on their ground just east of Broadway. Bridges’ ready made houses, as well as doors, blinds, sash and all things in that line will then be turned out in immense bulk; and in the gigantic enterprise being developed by this company, the whole county west of us will have a provider in all the most important items incident to the settlement of a new country. We are not aware as to who all the members of this grand company are, but we know that prominent among them are Lyman Bridges and General LaDuc [sic], and this is enough to show that the great enterprise will be put ahead in capacity to its fullest requirements and utmost usefulness. Settlers all along the line of the Northern Pacific can by reason of the existence of this company and their mammoth factories, be furnished with cozy and substantial dwellings in days after they select their land, to say nothing of the thousand other wants which will be filled cheaply, handsomely, and promptly by the Northern Pacific Manufacturing Company now located and in operation at Brainerd. We wish them the fullest measure of success for their liberal enterprise and unconquerable energy. (Brainerd Tribune, 11 May 1872, p. 1, c. 5)

Transfer of the L. S. & M. Railroad.


We are pleased to announce that the transfer of the Lake Superior and Mississippi Railroad to the Northern Pacific Railroad Company is now among the things that are. Although this has been expected for some time, yet for reasons not known to us the transfer was deferred from time to time until last Tuesday, when the final arrangements were made, the negotiations concluded and the road formally turned over to the possession (on lease, we believe), to the Northern Pacific. This will prove of great value to the public, as now, a person can do business with, and travel over, both with all the trials and tribulations incident to transferring from one to the other, in nearly every sense, cut off. (Brainerd Tribune, 11 May 1872, p. 1, c. 5)

18 May

The Sink.


THE bottomless pit, on the N. P. Railroad, a few miles west of the Junction, has been on another bender recently, causing the transfer around the sink of passengers, mail, express, etc., for several days previous to Tuesday last. For two or three days and nights the Superintendent with a large crew of men labored unceasingly to appease the appetite of the sink for gravel and things, but it it seemed much like trying to intoxicate a rat hole by pouring in whiskey. Hundreds of tons of gravel and logs were put in, and finally the bottom was reached, at a depth of from thirty to forty feet, after which the superstructure became firm, and by Monday morning the track was again ready for trains. Several extra trains were put on, owing to the great accumulation of freight at the Junction, caused by this sinkage, and now all things are moving bravely on. (Brainerd Tribune, 18 May 1872, p. 1, c. 4)

Personal.


WE have had the pleasure of making the acquaintance of Mr. R. S. Knapp, the Superintendent here of the mills, etc., being operated by the N. P. Manufacturing company. Mr. Knapp is from Hastings, and is a gentleman who has had a very extensive experience in mills of all kinds in this State, dating from as early a period as 1853. (Brainerd Tribune, 18 May 1872, p. 1, c. 6)

25 May

Improvements.


[...]


THE Railroad Headquarters building and hotel and its surroundings are being beautified in various ways. A lot of new picket fence has been built, the grounds raked up and cleared away and the offices newly fitted and painted. The hotel office has been furnished with a handsome counter—the design and workmanship of Mr. Doner—which is such a production as would ornament any first class hotel. It was painted by Mr. Foss, one of the champions of the brush in this western country. Mr. Foss, with his crew of artists has also been giving the outside of this mammoth building its final coat this week, and to say the thing has been radically changed in appearance, does not express it; the “Headquarters” really presents an imposing appearance as it now is, compared to what it then was. (Brainerd Tribune, 25 May 1872, p. 1, c. 4)

Personal.


WE had the pleasure of forming the acquaintance this week of J. M. Hannaford, Esq. who has just arrived from New England. We are pleased to know that he intends remaining in Brainerd, and will fill the position of Secretary to Mr. Chase, the General Freight Agent of the Northern Pacific here. (Brainerd Tribune, 25 May 1872, p. 1, c. 4)

Curious Freak of a Locomotive.


This is the only know photo showing one of the Northern Pacific's saddle tank engines at Brainerd in 1873. The Northern Pacific's first engines were this type, they were the Minnetonka, Itaska, Otter Tail and St. Cloud. A water tank was added over the boiler in order to provide more weight on the drive wheels, thus the moniker “saddle tank.” These locomotives were used in the early construction of the NP in 1870’s. A 1000x890 version of this photo is also available for viewing online.
Source: F. A. Taylor
ON Monday morning last the train for the east left here at the usual time, and met, ere it had gone a mile, with a most singular accident. At the machine shops, roundhouse and car shops, which are located half a mile above town, there is a switch track running from the roundhouse to the main track—a distance of probably sixty rods. On this switch, near the turn table stood one of the fine and powerful locomotives for which the N. P. is noted, which had been standing there for half an hour or more. There was no one on or near her at the time of the approach of the morning train up the main track. As the train neared the junction with the switch those on board were startled to see the engine start down the switch in the direction of the track. The nearer it approached the faster, and as the train could not be stopped before passing the end of the switch it was a race in the hope of getting past ere the locomotive came crashing upon them. It was no use, however, and just as the train got half way by, the truant engine came into the train, striking it about midway and about two cars ahead of the passenger coach. Three freight cars were knocked helter-skelter off the track and were badly wrecked, while the engine, which also ran off the track, at the end of the switch, was also considerably damaged. Had the train been an instant sooner the locomotive would have crashed into the passenger coach, when the loss of life would have been—no one knows. The wrecking car was sent out at once, and the wreck cleared away, though the eastern train did not continue on its way till after noon. We have heard of no satisfactory solution as to what caused the engine to cut such a caper, although many surmises have been offered. We rather imagine that the singular occurrence had better be handed over to a committee of Spiritualists and let them work up the case—they could doubtless get a good deal of “proof” out of the matter. (Brainerd Tribune, 25 May 1872, p. 1, c. 5)


30 May
The first Northern Pacific lands in Minnesota are sold. (Minnesota Historical Society Finding Aid M459, p. 10)

02 June

More Residences, Etc.


[...]


The new Immigrant House across the river is about completed, and is one of the finest of its kind in the west. (Brainerd Tribune, 02 June 1872, p. 1, c. 5)

08 June

A MONSTER MANUFACTORY


A character for enterprise induces its like, and it is only a natural consequence that it is our pleasure to-day to announce that early next week ground will be broken on Laurel street east of Broadway, for a monster foundry and blast works. It will be known as the Superior and Pacific Car Wheel Company, and will be under the superintendency of C. N. Parker of St. Paul. Brainerd, from the location of its first house and the pitching of the first tent of the followers of the great Northern Pacific has been marked for commercial importance and manufacturing greatness, and who that ever remained here twenty-four hours can gainsay the prophetic fact? We don’t have to offer bonus to such enterprises as the above—Nature holds out the inducement, and the march of inevitable progress to success insures the dividend. (Brainerd Tribune, 08 June 1872, p. 1, c. 4)

SEE: 06 July 1872
SEE: 13 July 1872
SEE: 03 August 1872
SEE: 24 August 1872
SEE: 01 March 1873
SEE: 18 July 1874
SEE: 21 January 1882
SEE: 28 January 1882
SEE: 25 June 1882
SEE: 17 November 1882
SEE: 14 November 1884
SEE: 31 March 1885
SEE: 01 April 1885
SEE: 03 April 1885
SEE: 18 April 1885
SEE: 02 April 1886
SEE: 10 January 1890
SEE: 02 June 1893
SEE: 10 November 1893
SEE: 25 December 1896
SEE: 09 June 1898
SEE: 21 December 1899
SEE: 31 May 1901
SEE: 29 January 1902
SEE: 21 December 1907
SEE: 16 June 1908
SEE: 04 April 1910
SEE: 09 April 1910
SEE: 18 April 1910
SEE: 20 April 1910
SEE: 25 June 1910
SEE: 01 July 1910
SEE: 27 July 1910
SEE: 03 October 1910
SEE: 05 October 1910
SEE: 06 October 1910
SEE: 13 October 1910
SEE: 04 August 1911
SEE: 20 February 1914
SEE: 15 April 1914
SEE: 14 May 1915
SEE: 28 September 1922
SEE: 13 October 1922
SEE: 10 July 1924


Fire animation The foundry building above becomes a theater and burns down with all of its equipment in 1878. It is the largest building in the city at the time.

SEE: 1878 Shupe’s Theater Burns in the Brainerd: City of Fire page.


SETTLEMENT, IMMIGRATION, AND COL-
ONIZATION ON THE NORTHERN PA-
CIFIC RAILROAD.


With the attractions of soil, climate, and scenery, which Nature has given the new North West, the simple building of the Northern Pacific Railroad would suffice ultimately to people the country along its line. Accessibility is about all that is needed to turn the tide of migration into this fertile region. Already thousands of settlers are following, and often preceding, the surveying and construction parties on the Road through Minnesota and Dakota. The same is true on the Pacific slope. As fast as the Road can be built, it will find a population already on its flanks. But, to render this natural movement certain, rapid, and constant, the Northern Pacific Railroad Company is organizing an Immigration Bureau in connection with its Land Department. The system adopted is practical though new and on a scale worthy of the great trust the nation has confided to this Corporation.
In carrying out the details of this scheme the Company will aim: 1. To employ as its Land and Emigration Agents, at home and abroad, only men of the highest character. 2. To permit no representations to be made by its authority which the facts will not fully warrant. 3. To promote, as far as possible, the formation of colonies, both in Europe and the older States of our own country, so that neighbors in the old home may be neighbors in the new; so that friends may settle near each other, form communities, establish schools, and, in short, avoid most of the traditional hardships which have usually attended pioneer life. 4. To exercise over emigrants, en route whatever supervision their best interest may require, seeing to it that transportation charges are the lowest attainable, that accommodations on ships and cars are comfortable, that their treatment is kind, their protection against fraud, compulsion, and abuse of all sorts, complete, and that every dollar of unnecessary expenditure on the way is avoided, and the emigrant enabled to husband his means for the work of starting a homestead. The company intend to complete the work of caring for the settlers who move to the line of their Road by furnishing lands at such moderate prices, and long credit, that the poorest need not remain landless; by aiding all who prefer it to secure homesteads from the Government domain; by transporting settlers, their families and goods at reduced prices; by seeing to it that all the elements of a sound civilization, including educational, church, and mail facilities, keep pace with the progress of the road and the growth of communities.
Mammoth buildings, designed for Homes for immigrants, are being put up at all the principal points along the line. They are not only homes in name, either, but are beautifully planned, airy and rich in architecture. Here, immigrants can tarry with their families, upon their arrival, until they have an opportunity to locate, with all the comforts, (so far as nice, clean and healthy quarters are concerned) as they could have at a first-class hotel. The Immigrant Home at Brainerd, is a monument to the good hearted liberality of the Company, and is a beautiful ornament to our town. It is no mere shell, hastily and carelessly put together, but a handsome and permanent structure, built with every care, and all due regard to substantiality and complete appropriateness. (Brainerd Tribune, 08 June 1872, p. 1, c. 6)

EXPRESS CHANGE.


The U. S. Express office has been removed from H. A. Hills to the depot, and the Brainerd Agency of that company is now under the management of Mr. Ferris.
The Northwestern Express Company’s office, however, still remains in charge of Mr. Hills, with himself as agent, and a continuance of the very liberal patronage that has been given this excellent company is respectfully solicited, and all business entrusted to Mr. Hills for this company will receive his best attention. (Brainerd Tribune, 08 June 1872, p. 1, c. 6)

15 June
Mr. Thomas Harvey, an old time friend of ours, from Duluth, was in town this week. Mr. Harvey has a contract for all the brick work and plastering for the N. P. Co., between Duluth and Red River. He already has a crew of eight or ten men here, who have been engaged this week in building chimneys in the mammoth Immigrant House building over the river. (Brainerd Tribune, 16 June 1872, p. 1, c. 6)

22 June

PERSONAL.


GEN. SPAULDING, late Chief Engineer of the Minnesota Division Northern Pacific Railroad has been in Brainerd during a portion of the week and favored us with a call. General Spaulding, since the close of his responsible duties on the great Northern Pacific, has been enjoying a sort of holiday, or vacation, and will remain in our State probably several weeks, during the hot term, when he will return again to New York. (Brainerd Tribune, 22 June 1872, p. 1, c. 6)

SEE: 29 February 1872
SEE: 14 December 1872
SEE: 02 October 1875

GRAND OPENING BALL.


There is to be given on Thursday evening next a grand ball and opening “blow-out” at the splendid new Immigrant Reception House, belonging to the N. P. Railroad Co., on the opposite side of the river. Three hundred invitations have been sent out, and it is expected that a great number of persons of note will be here from abroad. Our friend T. B. Shoaff, is one among the number who is superintending the preparations for this grand time. Music will be furnished by a string band from Duluth. (Brainerd Tribune, 22 June 1872, p. 1, c. 6)

27 June

Colonists’ Reception House, built by the NP to house newly arrived immigrants on their way to purchase NP land, ca. Unknown.
Source: Carl Faust
THE party at the Headquarters Hotel on Thursday evening in honor of the opening by the N. P. R. R. Co. of the Colonists’ Reception House, located on the west bank of the Mississippi, was the most complete affair ever gotten up in these pines. It was a brilliant array of the beauty, talent, and worth of the city of the pines—rendered more beautiful by the graceful presence of the beaux and belles of Duluth, Fort Ripley, St. Paul, Minneapolis, James River, D. T., Hastings and points east and west on the line of the N. P. The company was very large, the music and prompting unexceptionable, the refreshments choice, and richly served, and the enjoyment of those present most complete. The opinion has prevailed, and been to some extent demonstrated, that it was very difficult to get up a party of ladies and gentlemen, “to trip the light fantastic toe,” in Brainerd, without drawing the lines of class so taut as to raise objections and insure financial failure. From this time forward, this impression ceases. The moral and cultivated sentiment of the community has asserted its prerogative to rational amusement and enjoyment, and future calls from as respectable a corps of managers, and under the countenance of so worthy a person as the host of the “Headquarters” will be answered by the same array of beauty and real worth, as formed the basis of the attendance at the party of last night; may that call be not long distant.
The following is a list of guests, from abroad, in attendance:
Duluth, J. H. Hepham and wife, Maj. J. L. Smith, L. L. Trumbull and lady, H. Russell, W. P. Sargent, Mr. Munroe, Mrs. R. S. Morford, Miss Morford, S. Seaton and daughter, Hazen and wife, Miss D’Unger, H. A. Stratton, C. Adams, J. H. Shoenberger, Col. W. B. Gaw, Geo. H. Shoenberger, E. L. Bailey, Mr. Gates, E. W. Brady, A. J. Sawyer.
St. Paul, Charles Commisky, Temple Clark, E. C. Judson, James R. Day, C. D. Lombard, J. D. Sturgess, B. Hedge, Geo. B. Wight, Minneapolis; M. L. Knotten, N. P. R. R.; Mr. and Mrs. Doty, J. D. Weed, Capt. McCorsky and three ladies from Fort Ripley; Mr. Brown. (Brainerd Tribune, 29 June 1872, p. 1, c. 3)

29 June
J. GREGORY SMITH, President of the N. P. R. R. arrived in town last Saturday night by special train, and has been bobbing back and forth from Duluth to Moorehead [sic], and Fargo ever since. He and his party, which includes U. S. Senator Windham [sic] [Windom] of this State, are still at the west end. (Brainerd Tribune, 06 July 1872, p. 1, c. 6)

SEE: 13 July 1872

02 July

R. R. Accident.


On Tuesday last a construction train ran off the track a mile or two this side of Sicottes and killed one man instantly and injured another fatally. The man killed was Wallace A. Page, who was crushed among the rocks with which the car was loaded, and upon which he was sitting at the time. The other was James Pike, fireman, who was scalded in such a manner that he died twelve hours later. John Neely had both legs broken, and is here, doing as well as may be expected. Several others received slight injuries. The accident was occasioned by the expansion of the rails, by heat from the sun, which threw them out of line. (Brainerd Tribune, 06 July 1872, p. 1, c. 4)

SEE: 13 July 1872
SEE: 03 August 1872

04 July

SEVERE ACCIDENT.


Henry Cunningham, a locomotive engineer, met with a very severe accident on Thursday last at the turn-table up at the machine shops. He was standing on the table with his foot at the extreme end of the rail thereon, as it was swinging around into position to receive an engine. As the end of the rail came up to the end of the one on the track approaching the table, his foot was caught between the rails and crushed to pieces. He is now under the care of Dr. Thayer, and is doing tolerably well, although it is feared that he will lose his foot. (Brainerd Tribune, 06 July 1872, p. 1, c. 4)

SEE: 03 August 1872

06 July

GENERAL TICKET AGENT.


Mr. G. G. Sanborn has been appointed General Ticket Agent for the Northern Pacific Railroad, and has his headquarters at Brainerd. Mr. Sanborn is a Virginian, and will be assisted by his brother in the office here. He is a gentleman of fine business talents, courteous in manner, and full of energy. (Brainerd Tribune, 06 July 1872, p. 1, c. 6)

OFFICERS OF THE NORTHERN PA-
CIFIC RAILROAD
_____


New York Headquarters, 120 Broadway; Minnesota Headquarters at Brainerd.
President—Hon. J. Gregory Smith.
Vice President—Hon. R. D. Rice.
SecretarySamuel Wilkeson.
Treasurer—A. H. Barney.
Chief Engineer—W. M. Roberts.
Assistant Chief Engineer—D. C. Linsley.
General Manager—Chas. W. Mead.
Superintendent—C. T. Hobart.
General Freight Agent—R. W. Chase.
Gen. Agt. Land Dept.—Geo. B. Wright.
Disbursing Agent—R. M. Newport.
Supt. of Machinery—G. W. Cushing.
Attorneys—Sweet & Wood.
(Brainerd Tribune, 06 July 1872, p. 2, c. 1)

SEE: 1869
SEE: 09 March 1870
SEE: 09 October 1875
SEE: 11 November 1876
SEE: 09 December 1876
SEE: 23 April 1881
SEE: 31 December 1882

Dr. Samuel W. Thayer, first Medical Director, Northern Pacific Railroad, ca. 1864.
Source: Styles, Burlington, Vermont, Timothy G. Cooper
MR. EDITOR.—As you have given your readers from time to time items of interest concerning the Northern Pacific R. R. and its progress, your correspondent has interviewed a number of the medical staff and obtained the following information which may be of interest to the thousands of readers who have friends and relations employed upon the Northern Pacific and its divisions. The Medical Department was organized February 2d, 1871, with Dr. S. W. Thayer, of Burlington, Vt. as Medical Director. In order to sustain it a tax of 50 cents a month was deducted from the pay of its employees from the highest to the lowest. This tax has been regularly paid into the Company’s Treasury ever since. The system at first was unpopular and met with opposition from many of the employees, but the Company persisted in its deductions, knowing the practical value such an Arrangement, and as from time to time, employees began to receive medical aid and assistance, often of a nature that it would benefit them as many dollars as they had paid cents, without an organization of this kind, the old prejudice wore away and now its benefits and advantages are sought after and acknowledged by all. During last summer a hospital car was fitted up and maintained by the Northwestern Construction Company for the benefits of its employees, and in it were beds, bathing facilities and dispensary, accompanied by a nurse and under the constant care of a competent physician. During the present season the car will be in the service of Payson, Canda & Co., west of Fargo, and no doubt will be of inestimable service to many of the workmen of the Dakota Division.
As soon as the Northern Pacific took charge of the Lake Superior and Mississippi R. R. the same arrangement went into effect upon that line, and now the whole line is under medical supervision, and the following physicians have charge of it:
DRS. MURPHY and WHARTON, of St. Paul, look after the road from St. Paul to Hinckley and Stillwater. DRS. GOODRICH and KIMBALL, of Minneapolis, take care of the line between White Bear Lake and Carver. DR. S. S. WALLBANK, of Duluth, has charge between Duluth and Hinckley. On the mainline of the Northern Pacific, DR. C. P. THAYER, of Brainerd, presides over that portion between the Junction and Oak Lake, including the dispensary at Brainerd. DR. J. C. ROSSER, of Fargo, takes care of the road between Oak Lake and Cheyenne, D. T. From Cheyenne to a point 50 miles east of the Missouri is under the professional care of DR J. KURTZ, while the remaining 50 miles to the Missouri is under DR. C. A. McCOLLUM.
Thus the whole line is under the care of competent physicians and surgeons, and in case of illness or accident medical aid can be procured at once.
Dr. Charles P. Thayer, Northern Pacific physician, son of Dr. Samuel P. Thayer, ca. Unknown.
Source: Start, Tufts University Digital Archives
It is the intention of the R. R. Co. soon to erect a hospital at some point along the line, at which employees can obtain that care and attention which is so essentially necessary to their comfort, when overtaken by sickness or accident. The Northern Pacific is making early provisions for the comfort of its employees, and setting and example worthy of imitation by every Railroad corporation in the county.
Yours truly,
QUIS-QUIS.
(Brainerd Tribune, 06 July 1872, p. 4, c.’s 1 & 2)


THE NEW FOUNDRY.


We received a call on Saturday last from Mr. Spier, who is here for the purpose of superintending the construction of the new mammoth foundry, now in course of construction above Broadway near the Railroad track. This great and valuable enterprise will be pushed to completion at once, and will be one among the many stable institutions that is springing up in this new, beautiful and almost alarmingly enterprising young “city of the pines.” (Brainerd Tribune, 06 July 1872, p. 1, c. 5)

13 July

THE BRAINERD BRANCH.


Though a lull has taken place in the operations on the Brainerd Branch, from St. Cloud to this city, we feel fully authorized in saying that it is only a lull, and has not been abandoned altogether, as some of our down-country papers would like to have it. The Pembina Branch must needs be pushed with might and main to an early completion, that the interests of the Company may be subserved. Iron sufficient to push ahead on both branches cannot be obtained, and consequently our little branch to St. Cloud must “await its time with patience.” Nature, in all her phases, says the Brainerd Branch must be built; thousands of people are beginning to feel the need of it, and the authorities say IT SHALL BE BUILT, and that, too, inside a year. Our busy contemporaries will please stick a peg here, for we imagine we know what we are talking about. (Brainerd Tribune, 13 July 1872, p. 1, c. 3)

SPECIMEN BRICKS.


Ad for manufactured bricks, 06 July 1872.
Source: Brainerd Tribune
Mr. Knapp, Supt. of the Manufacturing Co.’s operations here, placed upon our table some specimen of the first brick made at the new Brainerd Brick yard, the other day. The first kiln was finished a few days ago, and contained 75,000. Another one to contain 150,000 will soon be burned. The brick, we are pleased to announce, far more than satisfied the most sanguine expectations, and are pronounced A No. 1, both in quality and manufacture. They are smooth, solid, and free from lime, to speak of, and are pronounced a better quality than any that have ever been imported to these parts. This is another highly important branch of manufacture to our town, and the Northern Pacific Manufacturing Co. can hereafter supply the great demand for brick with promptness, and need not fear competition. (Brainerd Tribune, 13 July 1872, p. 1, c. 3)

PERSONAL.


Mr. M. C. Kimberley, the efficient Chief Engineer of the Minnesota Division N. P. R. R. has been in town a portion of the week. Since his appointment to fill the place of Col. Gaw, as Engineer-in-charge of the docks at Duluth, we imagine his duties must be somewhat arduous. He will spend about half his time on the line between Duluth and Moorehead [sic]; and the remainder at Duluth. Mr. Kimberley is physically strong and mentally vigorous, however, and can readily come up to any emergency in his department, and is, withal, one of the many No. 1 men of the N. P. with whom we delight to meet. They are all good commonsense men, and do not belong to the “Big I and little you” order. (Brainerd Tribune, 13 July 1872, p. 1, c. 4)

PROMOTED.


Mr. Wm. Doyle, heretofore a brakeman with Conductor Edwin Schofield, running west from here, has been promoted to the conductorship of a freight train. Mr. Doyle is known to be a young man of strict integrity, and those best acquainted with him say the promotion was well deserved. We delight to record such incidents, and wish Mr. Doyle a thousand safe and pleasant “runs.” (Brainerd Tribune, 13 July 1872, p. 1, c. 4)

THE FOUNDRY.


The new Brainerd Foundry is being pushed forward with giant strides, and during the past week the frame work has been erected; Mr. W. F. Bailey, the manager, is a man full of energy, and proposes to be melting metal in this important manufactory, a week or two hence. We wish this firm success in this splendid enterprise. (Brainerd Tribune, 13 July 1872, p. 1, c. 4)

MR. EDWIN SCHOFIELD.


We had the pleasure of making the acquaintance of this gentleman the other day. Schofield is a conductor on the N. P., and one of those trustworthy and solid men that it is a pleasure and gratification to enjoy the acquaintance and friendship of. Mr. S. used to be conductor on the Union Pacific Road, we believe, when under the management of that accomplished gentleman and efficient General Manager of the Northern Pacific, Mr. C. W. Mead, and is one of the many valuable men that the Northern Pacific Company is getting together to conduct its important affairs. (Brainerd Tribune, 13 July 1872, p. 1, c. 5)

The Duluth Herald says: “We learn that the N. P. Company are making arrangements to let still another division (the Montana) of their road. The work on the Dakota Division is progressing so rapidly, that they feel no hesitancy in letting out an additional division. The contractors on the Dakota Division are pushing not only the grading, but also the track laying, and trains can now go 13 miles beyond Fargo.” (Brainerd Tribune, 13 July 1872, p. 1, c. 5)

PERSONAL—ERRATUM.


During a day’s unavoidable absence the latter part of last week, several matters for our last issue had to be written up by another party, and that party—we know thoughtlessly, but carelessly—made an awkward blunder from first to last of the personal notice of the Hon. J. Gregory Smith and party on the line of the N. P. Editors, like other men, are sometimes placed in a very awkward position before the public by trusting to others, and the item in question succeeded very successfully in putting us in an awkward position, which we regret exceedingly—it being a misstatement very poorly told.
Gov. Smith, (who is President of the N. P.) with a party of officials, made a thorough tour of inspection along the line of the Minnesota Division of the Road, and we are glad to learn that he was greatly gratified at the rapid progress of the Road, its local management, and greatly surprised at the wonderful development of the country along the entire line. On the other hand, his visit has been conducive of the greatest good benefits, lending a thrill of good cheer to the hearts of all, from the heads of departments and capitalists down to the humblest cottager throughout this great Northern Pacific country.
Gov. Smith was accompanied by his son, and Senator Windom, among the rest, and on their return from the west they tarried at Headquarters here a day or two, when many matters of great importance to the Company were considered, and we dare say disposed of with satisfaction to all. They here to inspect the L. S. & M. Division. (Brainerd Tribune, 13 July 1872, p. 1, c. 5)

SEE: 29 June 1872

The accident on the Northern Pacific west of Brainerd, referred to in last week’s TRIBUNE, was caused by the expansion of rails. An engine and six freight cars were totally wrecked. Two men were killed, and several others badly injured. (Brainerd Tribune, 13 July 1872, p. 2, c. 2)

SEE: 02 July 1872

20 July

INTERESTING LETTER FROM THE MIS-
SOURI RIVER CROSSING.


EDITOR TRIBUNE:—About the 20th of May I bade my friends at Brainerd good-bye, and reluctantly (for a time only) severed the many pleasant ties of friendship formed after a residence of a year and a half among the enterprising people of your thriving little city. For Brainerd, and her growth and prosperity I shall ever feel a lively interest. My destination was the new town at the Missouri River,” and securing passage for Sioux City, Iowa, thither I was hurried as fast as the iron horse could carry us. On arriving there my first business was to procure passage up the Missouri on some one of the many steamboats plying up the river. I found the fine steamer Ida Stockdale, which had just been purchased by the N. P. R. R., was about to start up the river to the Missouri crossing, and although it was not the intention of W. E. Wellington, Supt. of the Transfer Dept., N. P. R. R. to take passengers, I secured passage. Mr. Wellington had put the Stockdale in perfect order, and on our voyage up everything was kept neat and tidy as a lady’s parlor. Mr. Wellington has as good a steamboat record as any man in the west, and the Company is fortunate in securing him to organize their Transfer Department. The trip was very pleasant, as one sees so much to interest and amuse. Today a herd of antelope, grazing like a flock of sheep; tomorrow a cry of elk is raised, and all hands go for the pilot house, and then the scenery is ever charming, ever varied. After many days we pass Ft, Rice, and there we begin to look out for the famous town at the crossing. Somebody says,”I see tents;” and away beyond the bend are seen the tents of Engineer Ecalson [sic] [Eckelson], who is camped near the mouth of Heart River. We land and find that the town is six miles further up river, so still up we go. On arriving at Edwinton we find a real Minnesota community. Geo. P. Sweet is here representing the town interests, while among the many residents we see many familiar faces. The question of where the crossing will be is the great question with the people here. About seven miles up and down the river the land is covered with claim shanties, and every settler is confident that the road will cross his claim; but time will settle the question. The population of this place is variously estimated at from three to six hundred, and is composed mostly of people from Minnesota and the pioneers up and down the Missouri. Nearly every boat down brings people from Montana and the upper country. The general character of the people here is the best that I ever saw in a new town. No disturbances or trouble have occurred here, and the lawless element that prevails so largely in new towns has no existence here. In fact I never saw so many men gathered together from different parts of the country that were so quiet and well disposed. There is every promise of a fine town here. The geographical location, the fine land adjacent, the great amount of freight which must be disembarked here, all render it certain that here will be the town of the road, and already business is increasing rapidly. If the line was located, or is located within thirty days, I believe winter will find us with a population of three thousand souls. Shaw, Cathcart, & Co. have an immense stock of goods here, and several other parties have large stocks also, while of saloons there are only two. Prescott, Bly, & Co., of your city, have a good saw mill in operation. Ayers & Sanbut, also of Brainerd, are here as general contractors, and every day brings new arrivals, both from Minnesota and along the line of the Missouri River, and the people are evincing that they have confidence in the energy and enterprise of the N. P. R. R. that the road will be speedily pushed forward to this point. I believe that Edwinton has advantages second to no point on the road, and would say to all come and see for yourself.
Yours truly, A.
(Brainerd Tribune, 20 July 1872, p. 1, c. 3)

THE N. P. SURVEY WEST OF THE
MISSOURI.


General Rosser, in the light suit and hat, and Staff, ca. 1872.
Source: Minnesota Historical Society
The Pioneer understands that Governor Smith, President of the N. P. R. R., has recently ordered a new and very critical transit and topographical survey of the region of country west of the Missouri River, and the survey is to be conducted under the direction of Gen. Thomas L. Rosser, the distinguished Chief Engineer of the Dakota Division. Ample arrangements have been made with the military authorities for a large and effective escort to accompany the observers. The corps of engineers are being made up, preparatory to take the field on the 20th inst. It is proposed to extend the examinations of the country even beyond the Yellowstone River, to a connection with examinations of the country coming from central Montana. When the survey is completed, a full and critical examination will have been made from Duluth to Puget Sound. Doubtless this extensive survey about to be put on foot, going both east and west, is being done with a view to the extension of the road at least from the Missouri River to the Yellowstone. This survey will be completed, and the notes reduced to tabular statement, showing sufficient data and preliminary facts upon which to invite, and even accept, if necessary, propositions for construction by the 1st of Nov. next. (Brainerd Tribune, 20 July 1872, p. 1, c. 3)

SEE: 14 December 1871

SEE: 29 February 1872
SEE: 25 October 1872
SEE: 26 October 1872
SEE: 14 February 1873
SEE: 01 March 1873
SEE: 18 March 1873
SEE: 02 August 1873
SEE: 23 August 1873
SEE: 25 October 1873
SEE: 15 April 1876
SEE: 22 July 1876
SEE: 28 October 1876

SEE: 06 January 1877
SEE: 17 March 1877
SEE: 25 April 1877
SEE: 30 April 1877
SEE: 05 May 1877
SEE: 12 May 1877
SEE: 17 May 1877
SEE: 26 May 1877
SEE: 06 June 1877
SEE: 21 July 1877
SEE: 11 August 1877
SEE: 29 August 1877
SEE: 15 September 1877
SEE: 25 October 1877
SEE: 08 November 1877
SEE: 22 December 1877
SEE: 26 February 1878
SEE: 15 June 1878
SEE: 06 July 1878
SEE: 17 August 1878
SEE: 24 August 1878
SEE: 23 January 1879
SEE: 25 January 1879
SEE: 11 March 1879
SEE: 15 March 1879
SEE: 05 April 1879
SEE: 12 April 1879
SEE: 24 May 1879
SEE: 06 December 1879
SEE: 13 December 1879
SEE: 27 December 1879

TO BE BUILT AT ONCE.


The magnificent new passenger depot, that was fully described in the TRIBUNE a couple or three months ago, is to be built at once, and the workmen have already commenced operations. This will be another fine ornament to our town, and in point of beauty, in design and finish, will compare with any in the west. The second story of the structure is, we believe, to be finished off as described in our previous article, for Headquarters offices. (Brainerd Tribune, 20 July 1872, p. 1, c. 4)

PERSONAL.


Mr. Luther Allen, of New York, has been appointed Auditor of the Northern Pacific, and will have his headquarters at Brainerd. We received a call from Mr. Allen a few evenings ago, and spent a very pleasant half hour. He thinks this western country is decidedly a novelty, to one who has spent his whole life amid the straight-jackets of the East, but readily acknowledges its fine natural attractions, comparative freedom of style, and feels sure he can “harmonize” with we ‘uns and greatly enjoy a life in the West. He appears to be a gentleman of fine social qualities, with broad ideas, and knows just when the appreciation of anything comes in. We welcome him, and all such, to the gem city of the pines—”our latch string is always out.” (Brainerd Tribune, 20 July 1872, p. 1, c. 5)

STILL GOING LIKE HOT CAKES.


Mr. Lyman P. White, the efficient town-site Agent of Brainerd, has been kept busy for the past month in selling real estate to actual settlers in Brainerd, and as fast as they are disposed of, residences, business houses, and factories are looming up all over. The sales continue, and ere we are aware of it an important manufacturing city will have grown into existence here, on the beautiful banks of the upper Mississippi. (Brainerd Tribune, 20 July 1872, p. 1, c. 6)

One thousand Indians are reported to have collected at a point on the route to be taken by the Yellowstone expedition, which is to leave Fort Rice the 25th inst., and that the Indians are determined to prevent, if possible, the survey of the Northern Pacific Railroad through their lands. (Brainerd Tribune, 20 July 1872, p. 2, c. 3)

24 July

STATE NEWS.
_______

CROW WING COUNTY.


Workmen have commenced on the new passenger depot at Brainerd. (Minneapolis Tribune, 24 July 1872, p. 2)

Originally built by the Northern Pacific Railroad in March [sic] 1872 as its headquarters building [and remodeled as the depot in 1883], it stands on the southeast corner of Washington [Main] and Sixth Streets, near where the concrete water tower now stands, this depot burns down in 1917. (Brainerd’s Half Century, Ingolf Dillan, General Printing Company, Minneapolis, Minnesota: 1923, p. 19)

NOTE: The construction of the depot in 1872 is started in July NOT in March as stated by Dillan above.

27 July

KILLED.


One night this week somebody’s horned critter came to grief, on the N. P. at this place, in attempting to butt one of the powerful locomotives off the track. It got everlastingly scooped out, and now sleeps in the valley. (Brainerd Tribune, 27 July 1872, p. 4, c. 1)

28 July

[...]


ON THE ROAD.


At four o’clock the train left Brainerd for the Junction, a distance of 92 miles. Reader, did you ever ride on an engine? The reporter never had either, and he secured the necessary permission and perched himself on the fireman’s seat. If the inexperienced reader will take his advice, he will remain in his legitimate seat in the coach. The heavy mass of iron goes jolting and jerking over the road rendering it necessary for the occupant to cling on for dear life, while smoke and cinders fill his eyes and streak with soot the jumbled up vision he has succeeded in impressing therein. For reportorial purposes, however, there’s nothing like it. That is, always providing that the engineer is disposed to talk and disperse information.
A dense fog filled the atmosphere when the train pulled out of Brainerd, and so completely obscured the track that it could be seen scarcely two rods ahead. But into the density dashed the locomotive plunging along under the universal order of railroad companies to their engineers: “You are to presume that the track is clear, and go ahead.” Go ahead he did, at twenty-five miles an hour. Soon the sun came up and dispersed the fog. Straight as an arrow, for miles upon miles ahead, the track stretched towards the glory of the east, and the sun threw slant beams upon the bright rails, and they became two threads of silver. When two miles beyond the first station—Withington [Deerwood]—a large lake drifted by the train on the south. A long line of earth and trestle work skirted its borders—apparently an abandoned track.
“That’s where the famous sink hole is that swallowed up as many tons of earth and a whole section of trestle,” says the engineer. The roadmaster is constantly in trouble about those sink holes, which are numerous through the woods and swamps. They are apparently bottomless, or at least many of them, and a great deal of time and money has been expended in trying to fill or bridge them. In a great many places the road has been changed, sometimes a considerable distance, in order to avoid a slough which it was impossible to fill. The plan pursued, and which is the only one by which they can be crossed, except in occasional exceptional cases, is to corduroy them with long tamarack poles, upon which earth is then thrown until the mass ceases to sink. Trains can then cross these places, but necessarily at slow speed, for the track is very uncertain, and heaves and sinks sometimes with a deflection of a foot or more. At Sicotte, 59 miles from Brainerd, there is one of these places fully half a mile in length. An immense mass of earth has been dumped in here, with no result at all, and a sort of pontoon bridge is being built. A short distance beyond, another place a mile in length, is being piled, bottom fortunately having been found.
The only houses to be seen along the track, from Brainerd to the Junction, are at the few stations, and these are generally depots and water tanks, with a residence at the back end. The country from Brainerd to Kimberley, 39 miles, is of a very fair description, being high and rolling, and consequently well drained. Beyond Kimberley to the Junction it gradually grows from bad to worse, and is either swampy or rocky.

WORK ON THE ROAD.


The Superintendent is confident that the road will be completed to the Missouri river by the 1st of November. The track is laid 282 miles from the Junction, and iron is being laid at the rate of four miles per day, on the different divisions. At Brainerd, the new office headquarters are well underway, and are to be the finest in the State. A number of new depots are being built along the road, by one contractor, a man by the name of Bridges. They are all very large, and are elegantly finished. As an evidence of the style of finish, it may be well to say that each door, in each depot, is to cost not less that $25.00, and even the knobs cost four dollars a piece.
The road, or the running portion of it, is to be ballasted over the whole length, immediately, and will undoubtedly be one of the finest tracks in the State. (St. Paul Daily Press, 28 July 1872, p. 4)

29 July

SAD ACCIDENT.


On Monday evening last a deplorable accident occurred at the machine shops, or near them, whereby one man lost his life and five others were injured. The Company were having a brick “dry house” built, wherein to season the lumber consumed in their operation in car building, and the brick masons had just completed their part of the work when the accident occurred. The dry house was made of brick with an arched ceiling. After completing the arch the men undertook to remove the “center” or supports, inside, but in order to do so had to pry up on one or more of them with a lever power, in order to get the arch supports out; this sprung the mason work, and when the middle center was removed the whole arch, including a portion of the sides, came crashing down upon all within, of whom there were six. Wm. Dibble, a carpenter, and who was standing about in the center of the building, was buried and crushed to death almost instantly, although the other five, strange to say, came out with only severe bruises and contusions but nothing more. Mr. Dibble was a young man, in the prime of life, and was from Hoks [sic] [Hokah], Houston county, in this State. What makes his untimely death all the more sad is the fact that his brother was also killed on the Southern Minnesota Road some three months ago, and his aged mother came near dying from grief at his loss; and now that another of her sons has been sent home to her, a corpse, the shock will probably cause her death. Mr. Dibble is said to have been a fine young man, much esteemed by his fellow associates. On Tuesday his remains were deposited in a coffin, and was followed by a hundred or two of the estimable men employed about the machine shops and car works to the depot, who witnessed with tearful eyes the departure on the noon train of the remains of their unfortunate comrade. (Brainerd Tribune, 03 August 1872, p. 1, c. 6)

30 July

FATAL ACCIDENT.


On Tuesday evening last a train coming in from the west ran over a squaw a few miles out from here, belonging to the Gull Lake band of Chippewas. She was lying on the track directly across the rail, as we understand, and was supposed to be stupefied with whiskey, and laid down to sleep—her last sleep—on the track. Her body was severed in twain, killing her instantly. She was not discovered in time to save her, by the engineer. This is the first accident of the kind we ever heard of among the Indians, and was doubtless as “new” to them as it was sad. A coffin was sent out on Wednesday in which to bury her remains. (Brainerd Tribune, 03 August 1872, p. 4, c. 1)

SEE: 10 August 1872

02 August

What We Know About “Branches.”
HURRAH, FOR BRAINERD!
_____

The “Brainerd Branch” to be
Completed Immediately—
Brainerd, its Permanent
Terminus—Direct Com-
munication with St.
Cloud, Minneapolis
and Saint Paul.
_____

Good Times in Brainerd Now,
and Still Better Coming—
Let Everybody Hold
Fast, and “All
Promenade!”
_____

ANNOUNCEMENT.

NEW YORK, August 2, 1872.


Editor Brainerd Tribune.
“The Directors have ordered the track to be laid, and the Railroad completed im-
mediately, from Sauk Rapids to Brainerd.
THOMAS H. CANFIELD.”
The above is authoritative, and we return thanks for the prompt information. We feel as though we, ourself, are entitled to some credit, for stubbornly resisting the attempts of the interested people and newspapers of the lower region, in their persistent efforts during the past few months to not broadcast the idea that the “Brainerd Branch” would NEVER be built. We have done all that was consistent to assure our citizens, and those seeking homes in Brainerd and vicinity, that this important railroad WOULD BE BUILT, for we felt sure that Nature had decreed it, and that its construction was but a question of time, and we firmly BELIEVED that the time was close at hand. The importance of this branch line—laid from Brainerd straight down the Mississippi to St. Paul—to Brainerd, cannot be estimated as yet; and from this day onward, notwithstanding the great enterprise and wonderful growth of our place as it is, our Gem City of the Pines will take a fresh start and shoot forward with a velocity unheard of in the establishment of cities. Manufactories of every kind will spring into existence like mushrooms, and the inexhaustible lumber resources of this section will find a market here, west of here and south of here, in every form of manufactured articles and in the form of lumber. Although our growth for the past six months has been pronounced a solid one, now that the Brainerd Branch is to be immediately built and put in operation, the last ray of doubt as to the future of this important point vanishes like dew beneath a noonday sun. THREE CHEERS FOR BRAINERD! (Brainerd Tribune, 03 August 1872, p. 1, c. 5)

03 August

N. P. RAILROAD.


Gentlemen just in from the extreme end of the N. P. say that the great work is being put forward at a rapid rate; about two miles of track per day are being laid.
Work on the line is progressing favorably, and is being pushed forward as rapidly as possible. Mr. Loring states that the grading will be completed to the Missouri by the first of October, and that the iron will be laid through to that point as early as the 15th of November. (Brainerd Tribune, 03 August 1872, p. 1, c. 3)

COMPANY’S HOSPITAL.


Colonists’ Reception House, Frank Jay Haynes, 1877.
Source: Haynes Foundation, Montana Historical Society
The beautiful new and mammoth building lately completed here for an Immigrant Home by the N. P. Co., is, we understand, to be taken and used as the Northern Pacific Hospital. The building at Duluth, and the one at Glyndon—duplicates of this—are considered sufficient to answer as Immigrant Reception Houses, and it has been very wisely, as we understand, determined to convert the one here at the General Headquarters of the road, into a hospital for all employees, where the sick or wounded of the entire road may be properly cared for medically, and every other way. This, we consider is a grand idea, and the project verifies assertions everywhere made that the Northern Pacific Co. is the most liberal of any corporation in the country, in the noble matter of taking care of its sick and unfortunate employees. This fine and extensive institution will, of course, be under the immediate supervision of the Drs. Thayer—Dr. Samuel Thayer being the Medical Director of the Company, ably assisted by his son, Dr. C. P. Thayer. These gentlemen, besides standing in the front rank of their profession, are highly esteemed citizens, and are generally beloved by all employees of the Company for their kind and attentive attention to all the sick; hence, the news that a general hospital is to be established at this place will be hailed with the greatest satisfaction along the entire line of the Road. (Brainerd Tribune, 03 August 1872, p. 1, c. 4)

THE NEW PASSENGER DEPOT.


At Brainerd is progressing rapidly. The excavation for the basement story has been completed, and the walls are being fast put up. We have seen a portion of the brackets and other ornamental supports, etc., at the warehouse of Lyman Bridges, and we feel sure our young city is to have a passenger depot that will prove a great ornament to our place, and a fitting structure for the General Headquarters of the Northern Pacific. (Brainerd Tribune, 03 August 1872, p. 1, c. 4)

THE FOUNDRY.


This splendid enterprise, which is being superintended by our friend, Mr. Bailey, one of its proprietors, is nearly ready for operation, and is a fine appearing structure in addition to its valuable character as a manufacturing institution. We propose to try and get time to visit the Brainerd Car Wheel Works ere long, when we shall take occasion to describe fully what we know about the manufacture of car wheels and things. (Brainerd Tribune, 03 August 1872, p. 1, c. 4)

RAILROAD velocipedes are all the rage on the Northern Pacific—hand cars. (Brainerd Tribune, 03 August 1872, p. 1, c. 6)

THE NEW DEPOTS.


We could not help admiring, during a recent trip over the road, the neat little railway depots the Company are erecting at all the stations along the line. What seems admirable and rather peculiar to us is, that instead of building their passenger and freight depots both in one, they make two separate buildings—one on one side of the track and one on the other. They have adopted a uniform style of architecture, too, and at every station they are exactly alike. They are emphatically multum in parvo, and both in beauty of architecture and practicability seem to us to be just the thing. Lyman Bridges, of the celebrated Chicago firm of Bridges & Co., is the gentleman who has the contract for the building of these depots, and when the road is furnished with them they will prove monuments to the liberality and far-seeing enterprise of the N. P. Company. (Brainerd Tribune, 03 August 1872, p. 4, c. 1)

RAPIDLY IMPROVING.


John Neely, who had both legs broken by an accident on the road a few weeks ago, and Mr. H. Cunningham, who had his foot crushed about the same time in a turn table, are both, we are highly gratified to learn, improving very rapidly, under the care of the Drs. Thayer. They expect to be about again, ere many more weeks, and upon the cheering prospects of so rapid a recovery we congratulate them, and wish them better luck in the future. (Brainerd Tribune, 03 August 1872, p. 4, c. 1)

SEE: 02 July 1872
SEE: 04 July 1872
SEE: 13 July 1872

08 August

ACCIDENT.


On Thursday last an Indian, in an attempt, we understand, to get off a train, east of town, while in motion, missed his footing when one of his feet was run over by the cars, crushing it in a frightful manner. He was brought to town, when Dr. Thayer dressed it after amputating a portion of it. The Indian suffered great agonies, except when under the influence of anesthetics. We understand he is now doing as well as possible under the circumstances. (Brainerd Tribune, 10 August 1872, p. 1, c. 3)

10 August

NEW COACHES.


Several new and handsome railway coaches have recently been received on the N. P. R. R., which in point of elegance will compare with the finest passenger cars now made. The N. P. Co. evidently go on the principle, throughout all their operations, that what is worth doing at all is worth doing well; for, we heard a well informed gentleman say the other day, that he never saw a road anywhere that had so fine and substantial a lot of rolling stock as was to be found on the N. P. Railroad. (Brainerd Tribune, 10 August 1872, p. 1, c. 3)

ANOTHER MAN KILLED.


As one of the regular freight trains—Conductor Schofield—was coming from the west, and a short distance this side of Detroit [Lakes], the engineer discovered, upon coming around a curve, a man lying on the track, ahead. He promptly reversed his engine, whistled on the brakes, and used every effort to stop his train before reaching the prostrate form on the track; but as there was over thirty cars in the train, and the distance so short, it was impossible to save him. It was about dusk. The man laid with his neck across the rail, his face downward and his arms folded across under his face, his head resting on them. His head and arms were cut off, and his body frightfully mangled. The remains were taken up and brought to this place. From a small account-book found on his body, is name is presumed to be Jack Gannon. He was a stout, heavy-built man, and probably about middle-aged, and evidently a laborer. (Brainerd Tribune, 10 August 1872, p. 1, c. 3)

LEG CUT OFF.


A very valuable horse, belonging to Mr. Hireen, had his leg cut off by a passing train a few days ago, near the round house. Of course, he had to be killed. (Brainerd Tribune, 10 August 1872, p. 1, c. 5)

MURDERED.


The squaw spoken of in our last as having been run over and killed by the train west of here, it proves, was murdered and then thrown on the track, by another Indian—both being drunk. Another Indian boy saw the fracas between the Indian and squaw, saw him kill her with his tomahawk, and subsequently brought the bloody implement into town, and showed it around and related the circumstances. (Brainerd Tribune, 10 August 1872, p. 1, c. 5)

SEE: 30 July 1872

Mr. O. C. Green, recently of the St. Paul & Pacific road, has been appointed superintendent of the telegraph line of the Northern Pacific Railway, including the Lake Superior & Mississippi Division, with headquarters at Brainerd. (Brainerd Tribune, 10 August 1872, p. 2, c. 3)

The road-bed of the Northern Pacific Railroad will be graded through to the Missouri River by the 1st of October next, and the track will be laid by the 15th of November. (Brainerd Tribune, 10 August 1872, p. 2, c. 3)

MAIL SERVICE.


It is a pleasure, long sought, to announce that arrangements have finally been made whereby mail service, in charge of route agents, will hereafter be enjoyed on the line of the Northern Pacific Railroad. (Brainerd Tribune, 10 August 1872, p. 4, c. 1)

THE NEWS.


In reference to the immediate completion of the Brainerd Branch from Brainerd to Sauk Rapids, has been hailed by our citizens, and the people all along west of here, with the greatest gratification, and Brainerd’s future and present is being made the theme of conversation everywhere. “Brainerd” and “business” are acknowledged now on all sides to be synonymous terms. (Brainerd Tribune, 10 August 1872, p. 4, c. 1)

COLONY COMING.


We hear of an English colony, composed of 500 families, who are coming to the N. P. Railroad country early this fall, and who will settle between here and the Red River, on the line of the road. We send them a hearty welcome, in behalf of the thousands of good people already citizens of the new Northwest, and congratulate this section on the prospect of so valuable, respectable and extensive an accession to their numbers. (Brainerd Tribune, 10 August 1872, p. 4, c. 1)

12 August

ACCIDENT.


By an accident near Glyndon, on Monday night last, conductor Lockwood, of this place, had both his hands severely scalded. Although painful and quite severe, his many warm friends will be pleased to know that his injuries are not serious, and he will be able to be about again in a week or two, as we understand. (Brainerd Tribune, 17 August 1872, p. 4, c. 2)

17 August

STILL THEY COME.


The General Disbursing Agency of the N. P. Railroad, which has up to the present been located in St. Paul, has been removed to Brainerd, where Col. R. M. Newport, the N. P.’s efficient Disbursing Agent, will hereafter have his Headquarters. Paymaster Thomson has also removed his quarters hither, and with this branch of the Treasury department we have also to welcome to the Gem city of the Pines, Cashier Gardner and Messrs. Harvey and Degson. We wish them every enjoyment here in our young city, and know that their presence, as citizens with us will be appreciated and hailed with delight by all our good people. (Brainerd Tribune, 17 August 1872, p. 1, c. 2)

SEE: 26 April 1873
SEE: 12 December 1874
SEE: 19 December 1874
SEE: 09 October 1875
SEE: 29 January 1876
SEE: 19 February 1876
SEE: 03 June 1876
SEE: 25 April 1877
SEE: 06 June 1877
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SEE: 14 June 1877
SEE: 06 October 1877
SEE: 17 February 1881
SEE: 26 February 1881
SEE: 17 March 1881
SEE: 09 April 1881
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SEE: 30 April 1881
SEE: 19 May 1881
SEE: 23 July 1881
SEE: 11 February 1882
SEE: 18 February 1882
SEE: 30 July 1882
SEE: 05 February 1917

24 August

THE BRAINERD FOUNDRY IN FULL
BLAST.


Ad announcing the arrival of Charles N. Parker and his foundry in Brainerd, 24 August 1872.
Source: Brainerd Tribune
The Brainerd Foundry and Car-wheel manufactory, made its first cast on Monday last, and the great success that attended it showed with what correctness the arrangement of this fine and extensive establishment was planned and fitted up. Their first melting consisted of five tons of iron, which was chiefly used up in casting articles for their own use. This company, consisting of Messrs. Parker, Bailey, Howson, & Co., style themselves here the “Superior & Pacific Car Wheel Company.” We presume, from the style of the firm, they are to execute a heavy line of castings, chiefly for the furnishing of the Northern Pacific Railroad and its branches with all classes of Railroad iron and brass castings. But they will do a general business in the foundry line, supplying the country far and near with all kinds of castings, either in iron or brass, as cheaply and promptly as any foundry in the west. Their facilities are ample for any emergency, their corps of foundry men large, the whole superintended by Mr. Henry Rudgate, as foreman, who is a master workman in his profession. It is a real sight to visit this fine institution, especially on casting days, and our citizens visit it by scores to see the molten iron transformed into every description of useful articles, from a car wheel or immense shaft down to a two inch cog wheel, Mr. Parker, a member of the firm from their extensive foundries in St. Paul, was here on the occasion of their first cast, and he with Mr. Bailey, the partner in charge of the foundry here, must have been more than delighted with the result of their first effort here. This company is composed of men who are thorough, practical workmen in their business, and who have risen by industry and indomitable energy, to be one of the heaviest and most respectable firms in the western States. The value of so dignified and extensive an iron foundry to Brainerd can not well be over estimated, and the proprietors have started out with the kindest wishes of everybody in our young city for their prosperity. The first castings made for outside purposes, were some for Capt. Emerson’s steam wagon out at Fargo, which, when taken out of the moulds, and handed to the gallant Captain, caused him to smile audibly.
We call attention to the advertisement of the company elsewhere in the TRIBUNE. (Brainerd Tribune, 24 August 1872, p. 1, c. 3)

VISITORS.


It is astonishing, and nothing less, to know and realize the vast number of visitors that have passed over the Northern Pacific this season to see the renowned Northern Pacific Railroad country. Thousands have come and hundreds have remained at various points on the line, while hundreds more have returned to their homes in various parts of the world, only to prepare to come back again with their families and household goods, to locate permanently within the bounds of this great and inviting field. Next season, tens of thousands of immigrants will pour into this New Northwest, and this vast and recently howling wilderness will team with the industry of an educated civilization. (Brainerd Tribune, 24 August 1872, p. 1, c. 4)

THE “END” LEAVING US.


The rate at which the Northern Pacific is being laid down is simply marvelous. The cars are now being run away beyond Wahpeton—the second crossing of the Cheyenne River, and by the middle of next month the iron horse will scream at Jamestown—crossing of the James River, and November first will find the “dare-devil” locomotive smoking hot at the Missouri River, ready to take another leap in the spring, away into the pathless wilds of Montana and the Rocky mountains—away, away, away! (Brainerd Tribune, 24 August 1872, p. 1, c. 4)

07 September
PERSONAL.—President Thos. H. Canfield, of the Lake Superior and Puget Sound Land Company, accompanied by his Chief Clerk, George Follett, Esq., spent a portion of the week in our Gem City of the Pines. We enjoyed a brief but pleasant call from Mr. Follett, and found him to be one of your sociable, everyday men, that it is a treat to get acquainted with. He just thought, and very properly too, that Brainerd was “something,” to say the least of it—New York can’t hold a candle for it in some respects. Mr. Canfield did not favor our sanctum with the light of his pleasant countenance, this trip, because he didn’t have time. As a worker, and indefatigable applicant to business, Mr. Canfield is a remarkable success, and the onward and upward strides of the company he represents, in developing this grand region, points unerringly to him as being the right man in the right place. All the operations of the Company seem to be planned and executed with the greatest wisdom, and justice to the thousands of people now settling in this section both in town and country. (Brainerd Tribune, 07 September 1872, p. 1, c. 4)

MEN WANTED.


There is, seemingly, no end to the demand for men at this point and along the line of the Northern Pacific. Here at Brainerd, however, in the center of gravity on the line for the employment of men and the organizing of crews for all classes of employment. There are foremen, both in the labor and mechanical departments about in search of men. A prominent and experienced man assured us the other day that 5,000 men could find ready employment at Brainerd, between now and November 1st, at good wages. So, let the surplus men of the country below us come to Brainerd this fall if they want to work during the winter for good wages and ready cash. (Brainerd Tribune, 07 September 1872, p. 1, c. 6)

18 September
A YOUNG man named Bryant, had his foot crushed off on Wednesday last by the cars, while switching at the depot. He slipped and fell while getting on the cars when in motion, the wheel catching his right foot, and smashing it to pieces. He came near bleeding to death, but at last accounts he bade fair to survive the terrible misfortune, under the skillful treatment of Dr. C. P. Thayer. (Brainerd Tribune, 21 September 1872, p. 1, c. 5)

21 September
A HANDSOME STRUCTURE.—The grandest structure in the New Northwest is the General Headquarters office building, now being finished off in Brainerd. It is a mammoth building, three stories high, besides the basement—which latter contains three immense fire-proof vaults—with the heaviest, richest cornices and bracket-work, the whole surmounted by a Mansard roof, with heavy dormer windows, and an immense tower rising from basement away above the roof, ornamented at the top with an observatory and the richest finish. The whole building is surrounded by a great platform, and the offices inside for beauty, size and general arrangement and fit-up, will compare with any in the Western country. The whole structure is a thing we may all feel proud of, and all we Brainerdites are as proud of it as a little boy with a new knife. (Brainerd Tribune, 21 September 1872, p. 1, c. 6)

THE NORTHERN PACIFIC.

CHANGE OF PRESIDENTS—REASONS FOR
GOVERNOR SMITH’S WITHDRAWAL.


From the New York Evening Post:
The frequent rumors of the resignation by John Gregory Smith of the Presidency of the Northern Pacific Railroad have at last been confirmed by the action of that corporation’s board of directors. Mr. Smith’s retirement from the office was induced partly by the condition of his health, principally by the demand upon all his time made by the Vermont Central Railroad combination, of which he is the head. The Directors of the Northern Pacific have accepted the resignation of Mr. Smith, and elected as his successor, Geo. W. Cass, distinguished in American railroad enterprises, and recently the President of the Pittsburgh, Fort Wayne and Chicago line. Mr. Cass will take up his residence permanently in New York, and give his entire time and undivided attention to the Northern Pacific. His name will be public assurance of a wise and successful management of the great enterprise he has been chosen to preside over.

From the Philadelphia Enquirer:
Ill health having compelled John Gregory Smith, Esq., to retire from the Presidency of the Northern Pacific Railroad, the directors of that great and thriving enterprise, have chosen in his stead Geo. W. Cass. A wiser choice than this could not have been made. Mr. Cass having deservedly achieved an enviable reputation as an administrator of various railroad enterprises, while performing the arduous duties of President of the Pittsburgh, Fort Wayne and Chicago road. The new head of the Northern Pacific is, therefore, a gentleman of ripe experience in railroad matters, keenly alive to all the needs of the road he has been called upon to direct, and fully aware of the advantages which must accrue to the Northwest from the early completion of the Northern Pacific from Philadelphia to the shores of the Pacific Ocean. (Brainerd Tribune, 21 September 1872, p. 4, c. 1)

05 October
The rails are laid on the Northern Pacific railroad to Jamestown, within 50 miles of the Missouri river, and the construction train is running. (Brainerd Tribune, 05 October 1872, p. 1, c. 5)

19 October
BEAUTIFUL PRODUCTION.—General Manager Mead was presented, the other day, with a large photograph, in frame, of the “First Fruits” of the Land Department of the Northern Pacific Railroad, as they appeared at our State Fair. To say that the products are No. 1 among the best of this continent, is only repeating what everyone has said who saw them. The photograph, too, is a credit to the artist. (Brainerd Tribune, 19 October 1872, p. 1, c. 4)

Mr. O. C. Green, the accomplished and energetic Superintendent of Telegraph for the N. P. Co., is getting along finely in the work of putting up a second line of telegraph along the Northern Pacific. He will soon have two complete lines between here and the Red River, both of which will be worked to their fullest capacity in the discharge of the immense telegraph business of the road and the Fort Garry business. Our friend Greene is the right man in the right place, and under his accomplished management the clicking batteries along the line “emit no uncertain sound,” and his corps of assistants are all gentlemen and accomplished operators. (Brainerd Tribune, 19 October 1872, p. 1, c. 5)

25 October

PRESIDENT CASS AND PARTY.


Our little city was honored on Friday evening of last week by the arrival of George W. Cass, the new President of the Northern Pacific Railroad Company, and party, consisting of Directors C. B. Wright, Fred W. Billings, and Jas. Stinson; they were also accompanied in their visit over this end of the Northern Pacific by our esteemed and efficient General Manager, C. W. Mead, Superintendents C. T. Hobart, W. W. Hungerford, Engineer T. L. Rosser, and Hon. Wm. A. Howard. The President and his party came straight through from San Francisco in one of Pullman’s mammoth dining room cars, and the fact that a week before, this beautiful coach was on the other side of the continent, attached to it quite an interest as it tarried at our depot a day or two. President Cass spent Saturday in looking over the institutions and the results of the past operations of the Company over which he now presides, and on Monday morning left for the west. That this thorough business visit of “our new President” will have its beneficial results to the Northern Pacific enterprise and all matters and communities so greatly dependent upon its proud and speedy success, all have full faith. Everyone of thousands of people already settled along the line stands ready to do his part toward strengthening the courage of the noble men who have this gigantic and important work in hand. All our people have the fullest confidence in the present and future administration of President Cass, and in them our whole corps of managing officials here have a community of fast friends, who esteem them every one. (Brainerd Tribune, 02 November 1872, p. 1, c. 3)

HOBART:

SEE: 24 February 1872
SEE: 16 March 1872
SEE: 15 April 1872
SEE: 27 April 1872
SEE: 04 May 1872
SEE: 16 November 1872
SEE: 14 December 1872
SEE: 29 March 1873
SEE: 01 April 1873
SEE: 05 April 1873
SEE: 29 May 1873
SEE: 31 May 1873

SEE: 17 July 1880

SEE: 17 August 1882
SEE: 05 February 1917


ROSSER:
SEE: 14 December 1871

SEE: 29 February 1872
SEE: 20 July 1872
SEE: 26 October 1872
SEE: 14 February 1873
SEE: 01 March 1873
SEE: 18 March 1873
SEE: 02 August 1873
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SEE: 28 October 1876

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SEE: 15 March 1879
SEE: 05 April 1879
SEE: 12 April 1879
SEE: 24 May 1879
SEE: 06 December 1879
SEE: 13 December 1879
SEE: 27 December 1879

26 October
Gen. T. L. Rosser passed through Brainerd Tuesday bound east. The General is looking in splendid health, and has just returned from the Missouri River crossing. He states that everything is now quiet in that country. Since the late raid upon himself and Lieut. Adair, the Sioux have been quiet. (Brainerd Tribune, 26 October 1872, p. 1, c. 3)

SEE: 14 December 1871

SEE: 29 February 1872
SEE: 20 July 1872
SEE: 25 October 1872
SEE: 14 February 1873
SEE: 01 March 1873
SEE: 18 March 1873
SEE: 02 August 1873
SEE: 23 August 1873
SEE: 25 October 1873
SEE: 15 April 1876
SEE: 22 July 1876
SEE: 28 October 1876

SEE: 06 January 1877
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SEE: 27 December 1879

THE GREAT NORTHWEST.


The New York Tribune says: “The idea heretofore entertained that the climate of the Northwestern territories, along the line of the Northern Pacific Railroad, might not prove sufficiently temperate for the abundant production of all the cereals, is more than amply disproved by the wonderful agricultural products now on exhibition at the American Institute. Such evidences as these will have the effect of rapidly peopling these hitherto uninhabited regions, and thus open another immense and gloriously fertile territory, from which will be supplied grain enough to feed half the world.” (Brainerd Tribune, 26 October 1872, p. 1, c. 5)

Present Condition of the North Pacific
Railroad.
From the New York Tribune, Oct. 26.


It is announced that by the middle of November this new road will be completed to the Missouri River, 452 miles west of Duluth. This will be an addition of 200 miles since Spring. Trains have been running daily between Duluth and the Red River since April last, and new rolling stock is ready to equip the extension.
On the Pacific side in Washington Territory a small section of 25 miles has been sometime in operation. Forty miles more of track will be completed before the close of the season. Adding the completed portion on the Pacific side to the Eastern section, it gives a total of 517 miles of track laid in little more than two years from the commencement of work. When the delays encountered the first year in making the surveys and deciding on the best line through the forest region are considered, the result is marvelous, and attests the energy with which the work is pushed forward. Some idea of the work accomplished will be conveyed by stating that the finished portion of the road in November will exceed in length the New York Central, with all its lateral and branch lines included.
Besides the actual construction, the work of surveying and locating the entire line across the continent has proceeded with vigor. The exploring parties have fought a few scattering Indians but have carried their surveys successfully to the Yellowstone. The portion of the road now in operation has a large and increasing local traffic. It intersects the Red River at Moorhead, from which point a new railroad is being constructed northward up the valley to Pembina, where it will meet and join a line now being built southward from Fort Garry. It commands the eastward bound freight and travel of the British settlements in Manitoba, and also of the Hudson’s Bay Company. It is also the outlet of a large portion of the grain grown in Minnesota.
When the contracts for this season are completed, the Company will have a permanent business in the great traffic of the Upper Missouri River, with all the Government transportation in the Northwest. A few miles beyond the point where the railway strikes the Missouri the river bends to the westward, and is navigable for steamboats for 1,000 miles of water way from the railroad crossing to Fort Benton. At the foot of the Rocky Mountains, in Western Montana, nearly forty steamers are employed during the season in the trade on these upper waters.
In April next, at the opening of navigation, there will be direct communication, east and west, by rail and river, from Lake Superior, in longitude 92 degrees, to the populous districts in Western Montana, in longitude 110 degrees. From this point westward it is about 400 miles through the passes of the Rocky Mountains to that portion of the Columbia River whence it is navigable to the Pacific.
The finished sections of road entitle the Company to about ten million acres of land granted by the Government, constituting an area about twice the extent of Massachusetts. Ten million contiguous acres belonging to the Government are at the same time rendered habitable and salable. The lands are situated on either side of the line, and principally consist of excellent farming land, with the productive soil characteristic of all the prairie region. Settlers have already applied for more than a quarter of a million acres. The Company has already begun the cancellation of its seven-thirty first mortgage bonds by the proceeds of its sales of land, and is accomplishing its great work with the utmost success and economy.
There is a prospect of a large emigration of the tenant farmer class from England in the coming Spring. One colony alone, recently formed there, through its pioneer agents, secured a tract in Clay County, Minnesota, of 185,000 acres directly on the line of railway. The intended settlement is to be named Yeovil, after a town in the West of England, whence the majority of the colonists will come. The first contingent of this colony numbers about 2,000; the remainder will follow in 1873.
The bureau having in charge the Land Department of the road has built and furnished convenient reception houses for the free accommodation of intending settlers and their families while engaged in selecting their farms. One of these is at Duluth, another at Brainerd, where the road crosses the Mississippi, and a third at Moorhead, at the crossing of the Red River. Emigrants used to trundle with their ox-carts over forlorn and desolate prairies, and bivouac where the night found them. It is quite different now. They are carried in comfort to the very sites of their future homes,—and the organization of the system is such that they are protected from imposition or exploitation from the time they leave their old homes across the water till they begin the foundation of their new ones under the sunset. Every able-bodied and industrious man and woman who comes hither makes the nation richer and contributes to the general prosperity, and in this view the condition and prospects of the road are a source of legitimate congratulation. (Brainerd Tribune, 23 November 1872, p. 3, c. 2)

16 November
GROUNDLESS.—The rumor that for a few weeks past gained some local currency to the effect that Superintendent C. T. Hobart was to be superseded as Superintendent of the Northern Pacific, is, we feel safe in saying, entirely erroneous. Mr. Hobart contemplates getting a leave of absence for a couple of months during the comparatively dull season, we believe, to visit home and friends in New England. This fact is probably the groundwork of the rumor. Mr. Hobart, by his long faithful and laborious connection with the Northern Pacific from its infancy to the present time, has well earned a play-spell, and we wish him the fullest measure of joy and pleasure during his absence down in the country where cider and pretty girls do most abound. But so long as the local management of the Northern Pacific Railroad is in charge of such men as General Manager C. W. Mead and Superintendent C. T. Hobart, rumors about removals are very apt to be fallacious—for we dare say the Northern Pacific Railroad Company possess as great a degree of appreciation as other people. (Brainerd Tribune, 16 November 1872, p. 1, c. 3)

SEE: 24 February 1872
SEE: 16 March 1872
SEE: 15 April 1872
SEE: 27 April 1872
SEE: 04 May 1872
SEE: 25 October 1872
SEE: 14 December 1872
SEE: 29 March 1873
SEE: 01 April 1873
SEE: 05 April 1873
SEE: 29 May 1873
SEE: 31 May 1873

SEE: 17 July 1880

SEE: 17 August 1882
SEE: 05 February 1917


Northern Pacific.


The Minn. Tribune says: “There have been of late several rumors set afloat in regard to the N. P. R. R. that have worked great injustice to the Company. Coming from men who had just arrived from up the line of road they found their way into the newspapers, as those who uttered them intended they should. We learn from a reliable source the following facts: There has been an unavoidable delay of funds and a number of payments have had to be postponed. A letter was received in this city yesterday, from the officers of the Northern Pacific Railroad, stating that sufficient money to meet all liabilities of the Company would be here in thirty days. The grading on the road is completed to the Missouri River. The rumor that work had been discontinued and that horses, carts and other implements had been sent to the rear, was only true in part. There is now no more use for horses and carts as the road-bed is completed. At last accounts there were but twenty-two miles of track to be laid. The snow storm last week stopped work a few days, but it was resumed after the snow partially melted. At last accounts the track-layers were progressing with their work at the rate of one to one and a half miles per day. They confidently expected to be able to complete the track to the Missouri River before winter closed in. There still remains to be built a number of small bridges. If the snow storm of yesterday did not reach that point we may expect to hear of the completion of the road to the river within twenty days as the work will be pushed forward vigorously. (Brainerd Tribune, 16 November 1872, p. 1, c. 5)

22 November

Facts Regarding the Nor-
thern Pacific.


The Pioneer of yesterday, in refuting the damaging rumors set afloat by the enemies of this great national enterprise says: “It has been recently intimated by the enemies of the Northern Pacific Railroad that the work of construction is not completed to the Missouri river to this date, notwithstanding the report of the financial agents of the company, made some weeks ago, both in the United States and Europe, that the road would be fully completed to the Missouri river by the first of November. It is further intimated in the same quarters, that want of means, and the early closing up of the excavation by the drifting snows has been the cause. We deeply regret such wanton misrepresentations, calculated only to obstruct the financial operations of this great enterprise in order to benefit some others of much less importance.
The Northern Pacific Company were advised, both by Messrs. Payson, Canda & Co., the chief contractors, as well as by its own agents in the field, who had direction of the construction of the Dakota Division, that the work on the sub-division, including the laying of the track, would be completed by the 23d of October, as the necessary forces were engaged to do the work. When these reports were made to the authorities in New York, in the month of September, the entire earthwork had been completed and track-laying was progressing at the rate of two miles and a half per day. At this rate of progress, there being a certain number of miles of track and a certain number of bridges to build, with a full force of experienced builders engaged on each character of work, it was an easy problem to calculate the exact number of days required to complete the work, and, as stated above, was reported according.
The bridge contractors, Messrs. E. Sweet, Jr., & Co., were subjected to thirteen days’ delay, included in the months of August and September, in their department of bridge building, from want of bridge material. It is presumed that this delay was unforeseen by all parties concerned, and consequently no blame can attach either to Payson & Co. or W. E. Sweet & Co. But the delay of the track, caused by the want of bridge material, is the true cause of the non-completion of the road to this date, and therefore, not from want of means and snow, as has been maliciously intimated.
The track has reached a point 18 miles distant from the river, and if not completed this fall, it can be readily done in eight or nine days in the spring, and thus be in ample time to meet the opening of navigation on the Upper Missouri River.
We understand that negotiations are pending for freighting Government supplies over the Northern Pacific. This will necessitate the establishment of a line of steamers at the Missouri Crossing, of some considerable magnitude, as the Government alone will furnish a large carrying trade, besides the already great and growing trade of Montana. These large additional freights, taken in connection with the large freights going to Montana, together with the trade on the line of the Northern Pacific, the road must necessarily receive impulses in its opening business of ‘73, of no ordinary character.
In conclusion, it may be proper to state that the N. P. Co. has built on its main line alone 175 miles of first-class railroad in four months. This affords some idea of the vast amount that this Company has paid out in a comparative short time, and also of the energy displayed in every department of the work. The failure to lay a few miles of track, which can be done in ten days, is no cause for abuse of the Company. (Brainerd Tribune, 23 November 1872, p. 4, c. 1)

23 November
PERSONAL.—We are sorry to learn that Mr. John McGregor, who has been, since its commencement, one of the pillars of strength of the Northern Pacific Railroad enterprise, is to leave the road for the purpose of taking a similar position to the one he has always held here, (Road Master) on the Canada Southern Railroad. We are pleased to know, however, that the position he goes there to accept is a promotion, as he is to have the full control of the line as Road Master and ballaster, with a salary equivalent to the services of so accomplished a railroad man and gentleman. Mr. McGregor has made hundreds of fast friends, and no enemies, during his sojourn on the Northern Pacific, and he goes to his new field of labor with the best wishes of the entire community here. We understand Mr. McGregor resigned his position here because he could get fully as good a one, and at the same time be nearer home and friends, and we cannot blame him, although we are loth to lose any such men from this new and growing country. (Brainerd Tribune, 23 November 1872, p. 1, c. 4)

30 November
TRAINS on the N. P. are making regular trips, and running smooth as glass on the new time-table, from Duluth to Moorhead, 252 miles. This reminds us that they have a most wonderful way (to a greenhorn) of getting at the formation of a time-table. It is too big a job for us to undertake to tell how it is done, so that other outsiders could “know all about it;” we couldn’t do it any way, were we to “explain” till Christmas next year; but the result is, they cypher out a time-table by the aid of a mammoth diagram on paper, with about ten thousand perpendicular and horizontal lines on it, of various hefts; they have a regular cob-web of threads running at every conceivable angle across these lines—which lines mean ”time,” and the threads, distance—and secured at the angles by pins, the ends of the threads attached to small keys so that the thread cannot fly the track. By means of these distance threads crossing the time lines, they can tell just when trains can arrive at the various stations, passing points, meeting points, and can tell within five minutes when the passengers are hungry—except in the case of some old tough “cusses,” who can travel indefinitely on a cold doughnut—and accordingly certain stations are fixed upon as the right ones to “wood up” your stomach—the best place to do it on the line is at the Headquarters Hotel in Brainerd. Now, reader, isn’t it funny how they go to work to make a time-table? (Brainerd Tribune, 30 November 1872, p. 1, c. 5)

RESIGNED.—Our friend, Mr. S. V. R. Sherwood, for a year past one of the popular conductors on the N. P., has resigned his position on the road, and is hereafter to be a permanent resident of our city. Mr. S. will have in charge the personal supervision of his fine drug store here which he has built up to be a fine establishment. He sells every line of goods usually kept in a first class drug establishment at wholesale and retail. (Brainerd Tribune, 30 November 1872, p. 1, c. 5)

07 December
GENERAL Manager C. W. Mead, of the Northern Pacific Railroad, returned home, to the Headquarters of the road in this city a day or two ago, from a somewhat protracted visit to New York. Mr. Mead, we believe, was east strictly on important business connected with the present and future of this great Northern enterprise, and was in attendance at the late important meeting of the Directory Board in that city. We have not had the pleasure of meeting Mr. Mead since his return, but what seems to be pretty straight rumor, indicates the Company have laid out for their early spring work, the completion of this end of the Road to the Missouri River where it will connect with a regular packet line of steamers up into the rich Montana regions and with a line of steamers running down the river. The road to be pushed vigorously from the west end, eastward, and no doubt exists in our mind but that the Montana Division will also be pushed west from the Missouri during next season as rapidly as were the Minnesota and Dakota Divisions—although until the completion of that important link in the chain, the traffic between the Missouri River and Montana will likely be done by river. (Brainerd Tribune, 07 December 1872, p. 1, c. 2)

10 December

Report of the C. S. Commissioners on the Northern Pacific Railroad.


WASHINGTON, D. C. Dec. 10, 1872
To the President of the United States:

RECEPTION HOUSE.


In addition to the ordinary station houses the Company [N.P.R.R.] has constructed at Brainerd and also at Glyndon, the crossing of the St. Paul & Pacific railroad, a spacious and comfortable house intended for the accommodation of emigrants and others seeking homes near the line of the road. These houses will accommodate about 300 persons each, and are provided with plain and substantial furniture and necessary cooking utensils for the use of the occupants. It is intended that they shall be occupied, free of charge, by all persons in search of homes, either upon the Government or Company’s lands lying within the limits of the land agent of the road. A similar building is also located at Duluth.

14 December
We regret to learn that General Ira Spaulding, formerly chief engineer of the Minnesota Division of the N. P. R. R. is lying at the point of death in New York, with fever. (Brainerd Tribune, 14 December 1872, p. 1, c. 4)

SEE: 29 February 1872
SEE: 22 June 1872
SEE: 02 October 1875

SEVERELY ILL.—We are pained to announce that Superintendent C. T. Hobart, of the Northern Pacific Railroad, has been very sick during the present week, with the enteric fever, that has prevailed throughout the Northwest to such an alarming extent during the past three months. Mr. Hobart had a touch of it last week, and was confined to his room for two or three days; but, getting better, he went out and it is thought took a severe cold, when a relapse came on, and a good portion of the present week his fever has been raging, and at times his case has been considered very serious. Just before going to press yesterday evening we went to Headquarters to ascertain his condition, and were delighted to find that the fever had taken a turn for the better, and he was resting very comfortably. Dr. Samuel Thayer, the attending physician, says all he requires now is rest and good care. We hope our friend Hobart may not “get in a passion” about outside matters, but subdue his restless spirit, and let business wag as it will, until he becomes thoroughly convalescent, lest he should again be thrown upon a bed of sickness. As soon as he has sufficiently recovered he intends going east to spend three or four weeks on a visit of business and pleasure combined, and his hosts of friends here will wish him a pleasant time and safe and speedy return. (Brainerd Tribune, 14 December 1872, p. 1, c. 4)

SEE: 24 February 1872
SEE: 16 March 1872
SEE: 15 April 1872
SEE: 27 April 1872
SEE: 04 May 1872
SEE: 25 October 1872
SEE: 16 November 1872
SEE: 29 March 1873
SEE: 01 April 1873
SEE: 05 April 1873
SEE: 29 May 1873
SEE: 31 May 1873

SEE: 17 July 1880

SEE: 17 August 1882
SEE: 05 February 1917


Report on the Northern
Pacific R. R.


The Commissioners appointed to inspect the Minnesota Division of the Northern Pacific Railroad prior to its acceptance by the Government, on Tuesday, made their report to the Secretary of the Interior, substantially as follows:
“The section examined is found to be well located, both with reference to local and through traffic. The grades are light, three-fourths of the distance below the average of thirty feet, the sharpest curves being three degrees in radius, with two thousand feet embankment, and the excavations are within the requirements of the law. The ballasting is well done with gravel. The rolling stock is uniformly of excellent quality and good condition, and amply sufficient for all present and future requirements. The engine houses and repair shops are deemed to be adequate. Mention is made of the emigrant houses at Brainerd, Glyndon and Duluth, as being constructed with furniture and cooking utensils for the free use of those intending to settle on the Company’s or Government lands. The snow fences, water stations, telegraph lines are considered ample for their purposes.
The report closes as follows: Having found this portion of the road to be judiciously located, and well constructed and equipped, and believing that it substantially meets the requirements of both the letter and spirit of the law and department regulation, the Committee recommend its acceptance by the Government. The report covers a distance of 228 miles.” (Brainerd Tribune, 14 December 1872, p. 1, c. 5)

FROM JAMES RIVER.—By a private letter received by our fellow townsman, J. Ayers, Esq., from R. Lambert, at James River, Dakota, dated Dec. 24, we learn that the recent “cold storm” thereaway was terribly severe. A train of sixteen wagons, loaded with suttler supplies for Fort McKean, was caught between the Cheyenne and Jamestown, and the whole party, including Mr. Lambert and Mr. Christie, suttler at Fort McKean, came within a hair’s breadth of perishing. They were compelled to throw away half their loads, and finally to abandon teams entirely, and strike out for Jamestown every man for himself. Strange to tell, every man got in, but many of them were fearfully frozen. Pat. Hill, the mail carrier between the Missouri and Jamestown, came into the latter place about the same time, but was so badly frozen that legs and one arm will have to be amputated. The sutler party, that portion of them who escaped freezing, returned the next day to where they had left their teams and got them into Jamestown, but in a wretched condition. (Brainerd Tribune, 04 January 1873, p. 1, c. 5)

1873
04 January
GETTING READY FOR BUSINESS.—Mr. J. S. Campbell, Sup’t. of the Brainerd Lumber and Manufacturing Co., informs us that the new and improved machinery that they have been introducing into their planing mill, is nearly ready for business. This new lot consists of Sash, Door and Blind machines, of the most improved patterns, and taking the whole establishment together, as it now stands, certainly looks like an enterprise, and as though our city is hereafter to possess a manufactory equal to any in the State, of its kind. The country west of us, which will doubtless be flooded by immigration in the Spring, will find that their wants have been anticipated, and every imaginable thing, from a ready-made house to a light of 8x10 glass can be furnished them at a moment’s notice, and at the most reasonable prices. We wish this Company the most abundant success. (Brainerd Tribune, 04 January 1873, p. 1, c. 3)

ANOTHER grand presentation took place a few days ago at the Northern Pacific Machine Shops of this place. The little army of employees laid their heads together, and presented Master Mechanic Wiley with a beautiful stem-winding gold watch and chain, costing upward of $300. We are in possession of none of the particulars of the occasion, but feel sure that Mr. Wiley not only appreciated the situation, but did the handsome thing for the boys, as they certainly did by him in tendering so magnificent a token of their high esteem and regard. (Brainerd Tribune, 04 January 1873, p. 1, c. 4)

11 January

The Northern Pacific all Right!


The fearful snow and wind storm that visited all parts of the western and northwestern country this week, blockaded all the railroads as far south as Omaha, and through Missouri, Illinois, Wisconsin and Michigan. None of the roads are opened even yet, scarcely, and many of them, five hundred miles below here, will be closed for a week to come. But, what of the Northern Pacific? we hear you ask. Why, it was opened up its entire length, WITHIN FORTY-EIGHT HOURS after the storm abated, and trains are now making regular and “COMFORTABLE TRIPS.” Will the enemies of this grand continental thoroughfare please put these facts in their pipes and smoke them? (Brainerd Tribune, 11 January 1873, p. 1, c. 3)

IMMIGRATION.—Never before were the prospects half so bright as now for an immense immigration into the rich and beautiful country along the Northern Pacific Railroad. The opening of Spring, will be the signal for an incoming rush of settlers, such as never before been equaled even in this State. We draw our conclusions from a multitude of sources. We see by papers both in this country and Europe, that thousands are making preparations to come. From and after the first day of May next, the country between Brainerd and the Red River will have become a thickly settled one, and occupied by a high order of people; and a year further on will see the magnificent prairies thereaway, teeming with agricultural wealth, and dotted far and near with the habitations of an industrious, intelligent, Christian people. Let these “beauty-spots” on the face of nature, be added to the hundreds of beautiful groves, the scores of sparkling lakes, and the flower bedecked prairies, and he who looks out upon the panorama will do so with the determination to live among them. These are facts, not fancies; and in less than two years the country between this place and Fargo, which is unsurpassed for beauty and fertility under the shining sun, will be owned, and tilled by the industrious hands of the “actual settler.” We extend a hearty welcome to all good people from every clime to come and secure a home in the land of which we speak. (Brainerd Tribune, 11 January 1873, p. 1, c. 3)

THE PROSPECT.—Aside from the immense immigration that is to pour in upon us in the spring, Brainerd has many things in store for her, in the immediate future, calculated to bring good cheer to her people. It has been definitely decided to finish up the Brainerd Branch Railroad as soon as spring opens. The Pembina, or St. Vincent Branch, is also to be completed, and equipped for the immense business in waiting for it. The main line of the Northern Pacific will, immediately upon the disappearance of winter, be shoved to the Missouri River, and placed in connection with a splendid line of steamers up and down the river, giving us communication with Montana. Many extensive manufacturing establishments will be added to those already here, to work wealth in manufactured articles from the inexhaustible pine forests made tributary to Brainerd by the Mississippi River and its scores of branches. The projected branch road from Brainerd to Fergus Falls must also, from the very nature of the case, be a thing speedily consummated. Although times are, comparatively speaking, rather dull here at present, still there is double the life and money here that any place below us enjoys, and the approach of spring must needs bring us back again to our wonted life and vigor. All in all, the future of, not only Brainerd, but all the Northern Pacific country, was never so bright as it is now. (Brainerd Tribune, 11 January 1873, p. 1, c. 4)

A HEAVY CONTRACT.—Col. W. S. King, and others, have concluded a contract with the Northern Pacific Railroad Company for the construction of 300 miles of the west end of the road, work to be commenced immediately and completed early next season. That don’t look very much like a failure of this great enterprise. (Brainerd Tribune, 11 January 1873, p. 1, c. 5)

15 January
THE NORTHERN PACIFIC.—The New York Sun of the 15th inst., says:—”The Herald reports that the Northern Pacific Railroad is in embarrassment, and is not able to pay its current debts. Without having made any special inquiry into the accuracy of this report we do not hesitate to say that there must be a mistake about it. The Northern Pacific means Mr. Jay Cooke. That great banker has brought the enterprise before the public and is morally responsible for its success. In his case, too, moral and financial responsibilities are equivalent. He cannot afford to allow the Northern Pacific to fail, or what is the same thing, to remain under pecuniary embarrassment. Whatever may have been his original intention, he must put his whole private fortune—and this is believed to be many millions of dollars—into the undertaking, sooner than suffer it to stop or languish and fall into discredit. For this reason the Herald’s report must be inaccurate: and we are confident that Mr. Jay Cooke will at once reassure the public by recognizing and meeting the obligation that rests upon him.” (Brainerd Tribune, 25 January 1873, p. 1, c. 7)

17 January
The Pay-car visited the machine shops yesterday, and paid for the month of November. It left this morning for Duluth, and will pay from here eastward, when it will return and go to the west, paying all the industrious men who are standing to their work in the various departments of the great Northern Pacific—the path-finder of the world. (Brainerd Tribune, 18 January 1873, p. 1, c. 5)

18 January
A CAR was lately shipped directly through from Brainerd to Boston, loaded with 12,000 pounds of venison, one ton of turkeys, 2,000 pheasants, 4,000 pounds of butter and two carcasses of youthful bear. (Brainerd Tribune, 18 January 1873, p. 1, c. 6)

22 January
A SURPRISE PARTY.—On Wednesday evening last, agreeable to previous arrangement and invitation, somewhere near a hundred and fifty of our best citizens, old and young, might have been seen gathering from the “three quarters” of our city, at a given point in the Third Ward. Every group had in transit, baskets, bundles, buckets, and parcels of various kinds. By 7 1-2 o’clock the place of rendezvous resembled a camp in the African diamond field, barring the presence of “natives,” and at a given moment the bundled-up assemblage commenced stringing out in a southerly direction led by someone with a brilliant lantern. Silently, that immense concourse of youth and beauty, steadied in its proceedings by gray hairs, old in wisdom but young in spirit, followed on, many scarcely knowing whither they were going, nor what for, only sure that fun was ahead. Southerly for a time and then westward down Main Street, that “head-light” wended its way, until the river was reached; then across its frigid bosom down its western shore, then up the precipitous bank, wended that long troop, ‘neath the pale beams of the Goddess of Night—except that there was “no moon, no how.” The snow banks of Cass County proved no obstacle, whatever, but the invincible column of pioneers and pioneeresses waded, scrambled, went out of sight in the beautiful snow, ever and anon but when one was lost a score of willing hands commenced the work of excavating, in a manner that would put a snow plow to the blush. The victim of the treacherous snow once above board, the column would proceed, with a few remarks apropos to the condition of things, until the head of the procession entered the capacious apartments of the magnificent Northern Pacific Reception House in West Brainerd, where the weary found rest, and refreshments mountains high.
After the destruction by fire of the building over in West Brainerd used by the Ahrens brothers as a County building for Cass County last fall, the Company very liberally tendered these gentlemen the temporary use of the fine Reception building for County offices, and they have placed the entire premises in the most tasty and tidy condition. It was these two popular young gentlemen, (the Ahrens brothers) who were the surprised parties, as they found themselves suddenly in possession of so formidable an army, and all they could do was just what they did do—surrender with grace, and, comprehending the situation in a moment, made every effort to put all at perfect ease by a warm welcome, accompanied by every sign of true, genuine hospitality.
After all had doffed their outer garments, the supplies had all been stored in the capacious larder, and committees had been appointed in the various departments, the great company gave themselves up to enjoyment appropriate to the occasion. In a few minutes Fretwell, Conant & Stearns’ String Band appeared on the scene, and this ends the description of what all this thing meant—it meant “business” nothing more, nothing less. A most bountiful supper, including delicious coffee was served at 12 o’clock; the dance continued until 2 A. M., and then all went home again, pronouncing the whole affair the grandest success, and happiest event that ever occurred in this New Northwest. (Brainerd Tribune, 25 January 1873, p. 1, c. 4)

23 January

A Worthy Presentation.


On Thursday evening last a party of gentlemen quietly assembled in the parlors of Messrs. Martin & McLean, who had loaded tables with choice meats, game, viands, confectionery, prepared by Messrs. Salisbury & Wilson, of the St. Charles Restaurant. MR. JOHN McGREGOR, who has been connected with the N. P. R. R., since its commencement, always holding important positions in the construction of the Road, and for the past year and a half being the Road Master of this great Railway, was invited to occupy the head of the table, Mr. W. W. Weed, Road Master, occupying the foot of the table as Master of Ceremonies. After the party had been seated, Mr. Jno. C. Robinson, who had been appointed for the purpose, addressed Mr. McGregor as follows:

Brainerd, Jan. 23rd, 1873.

Mr. Jno. McGregor.—Roadmaster Minn. Div.—In behalf of the Section Foremen and men of the Minnesota Division, N. P. R. R., it gives me great pleasure to be the medium through which you are presented this chain, ring, and set of sleeve buttons, as a slight token of their esteem for you as a gentleman, and your uniform kindness as a superior officer.
May the token thus presented be received by you in the same spirit as it is bestowed, and ever be a reminder that true merit never falls short of due appreciation among men.
In conclusion, we wish that Heaven’s choicest blessings may fall upon you hereafter, and we crave a place in your memory in the future, as we have in your kindness of heart during the past.
Mr. McGregor, being taken very much by surprise, and also being a man of action instead of words, replied briefly by thanking, with a few well-timed and grateful remarks, the donors of the rich gift; after which the articles of jewelry mentioned were examined by the friends. They were furnished by Mr. E. L. Strauss, the well-known Jeweler of Brainerd, and are exceedingly rich in appearance, and show great skill in workmanship.
And now came the order to ’set to.’ Twenty-five or more gentlemen paying strict attention to the order, partook of a finer supper than we have ever seen served before in this section of the country.
After the feast, “Auld Lang Syne” sung with heart and by strong voices, produced a pleasant effect upon the party. A few remarks by some of those present closed the ceremonies, and the party adjourned, all delighted with the pleasantness of the affair, its conception, its presentation, its acceptance, and its close. (Brainerd Tribune, 25 January 1873, p. 1, c. 3)

24 January
ORDINANCE NO. 8.—An ordinance to prevent the encumbering of streets, and alleys, side-walks, lanes and public grounds, and to prevent and punish immoderate driving or riding in the streets, and to regulate the speed of cars and locomotives in said City.

[...]


SEC. 3. Whoever shall obstruct any of the crossings of the streets in said city by locomotives, tenders, cars, or other vehicles, or whoever shall be in charge of any locomotive engine or train of cars, and drive or run the same in or through the City of Brainerd, at a greater rate of speed than six miles per hour, shall, upon conviction therefor, be punished by a fine not exceeding Fifty dollars for the first offense, or by such fine or imprisonment not exceeding Thirty days for the second offense, or by both such fine and imprisonment.
Passed January 24, 1873.
LYMAN P. WHITE,
President of Common Council.
(Brainerd Tribune, 25 January 1873, p. 4, c’s 2 & 3)

25 January
THE following appeared among the Washington dispatches of the New York Herald of Tuesday last:
“It is rumored that the financial embarrassment of the Northern Pacific Railroad is such that they are preparing to ask Congress for a guarantee of their bonds.”
The Philadelphia Press of Wednesday, in alluding to the matter, says it learns from the highest authority that there is no truth whatever in the rumor; on the contrary, the finances of the company are in an excellent condition; the average sales of bonds since the first of January are fully equal to the sales of last January. They have not applied, nor are they preparing to apply, to Congress for a guarantee of their bonds. (Brainerd Tribune, 25 January 1873, p. 1, c. 4)

02 February
A COLLISION between the westward bound train and an eastward bound snow plow took place the other day, out at Hobart. The passenger train was standing on the track at that Station, when along came the snow plow train from the west, at a good speed and smashed into the train, scooping the passenger locomotive right up on the plow, running it clear up on to it. The engineer on the plow engine knew nothing of it, till the other engine came rearing up clear to the top of his giant drift-annihilater. The engines were considerably damaged, and some of the cars smashed somewhat, but fortunately no one was hurt—the passengers all being out in the depot. The engineer on the snow plow train, did not know he was approaching a station, as we understand; the snow was blowing considerably, and he lost his reckoning, and was just “letting ‘er pound.” (Brainerd Tribune, 02 February 1873, p. 1, c. 3)

06 February
SWIFT JUSTICE.—On Thursday the 6th inst., when the N. P. Pay Car was paying off the employees at Detroit [Lakes], a man named Mat. Diamond entered the car, and, with account in hand, impersonated another man named S. Diamond. The account he presented, exactly corresponded with that due S. Diamond, as shown by the books, and accordingly the amount was paid over and his receipt taken as S. Diamond. After getting the money, he started off down the line; the forgery, however, was soon discovered, when the Paymaster telegraphed to the section men who captured the rascal and returned him to Detroit [Lakes]. The next day he had his hearing before a Justice Court, was held for trial at the next term of the District Court, and on Wednesday he passed through Brainerd on his way to the Ramsey County jail for safe keeping. This is not the first occurrence of the kind, but from this time forward those guilty of such a crime are to be punished to the fullest extent of the law, in order to effectually squelch such offenses, and it is probable that Mr. Mat. Diamond will lead off in the State Prison gang, convicted of forging accounts on the Railroad. A word to the wise is sufficient. Let this Diamond stand out as a brilliant warning to others. (Brainerd Tribune, 15 February 1873, p. 1, c. 6)

07 February
AMUSEMENTS.—We have before remarked that we have seen in no other place, with like population of Brainerd, so many fun-loving people; we have now to say, or more amusement lovers, particularly in the Terpsichorean Art. Dancing occurs nearly every week night, and it frequently happens that two or even three parties of this kind occur on the same evening. Among the most notable of the season was the Sociable given on Friday night of last week, under the auspices of the employees of the machinery department of the N. P. R. R., at Bly’s Hall, a large commodious room which was well filled early in the evening by a joyous crowd of both sexes. The Duluth quadrille band served their finest music, and all were “merry as a marriage bell.” Under the care and gentlemanly management of Mr. J. E. Wilson, who guided the wary and unwary with equal regularity to all, and by the aid of “MIKE,” the participators had “GRACE,” and all was lovely. As this was particularly a Railroad Ball, we give below the programme, which is characteristic as well as novel:
1. Grand March—R. R. Boys.
2. Quadrille—Snow Plow.
3. Schottisches—Dakota.
4. Les Lancers.
5. Walz—Engines 40 and 43.
6. Quadrille.
7. Varsouvienne.
8. Les Lancers—By having Grace we go Through.
9. Schottische.
10. Quadrille—”Toot, toot,” now we’re off.
11. Polka Mazourka.
12. Fireman’s Dance—Locomotive.
13. Polka—Stop here for Supper.

INTERMISSION.

14. Quadrille—All Right, Go Ahead.
15. Waltz—Ladies’ Choice.
16. Tempest—Down Brakes.
17. Virginia Reel.
18. Quadrille—Caledonia—On Time.
19. Schottische—”Couple Up.”
20. Sicilian Circle.
21. Quadrille.
22. Opera Reel—A Life on the Iron Rail.
23. Waltz and Five Step.
24. Quadrille.
25. Les Lancers—Blow your Whistle.
26. Monie Musk.
27. Schottische—All Aboard.

“HOME, SWEET HOME.”

The party intact lingered into the “wee sma’ hours ayant the twal,” and then reluctantly departed, all well pleased with their night’s entertainment. Much credit is due the gentlemen who planned and carried out so successfully the “ne plus ultra” of the season.
Another pleasant affair of last week of like nature was the party given by the employees of the Hotel de Headquarters to their friends and acquaintances. Many were there, and all enjoyed hugely the tripping of the light fantastic toe. Mr. James Bagley, the genial Steward of the hotel mentioned, graced the floor as Manager, with the same courtesy he extends to the numerous guests that come under his care.
During the present week the Club dances were well attended, and passed off quietly and agreeably. Surely the dancing-loving community are afforded sufficient amusement and exercise to keep away spleen and dyspepsia. It is well. (Brainerd Tribune, 15 February 1873, p. 1, c. 5)

12 February

TERRIBLE TRAGEDY.


A terrible tragedy occurred at the Shades billiard Hall, of this place, on Wednesday evening last, whereby one Patrick Egan lost his life. It appears that he and a man named Jesse E. Wilson, (son of J. P. Wilson, of St. Cloud), were engaged at a game of cards—five cents ante—and after playing for some time a dispute arose as to which had won the stakes, which by this time had increased to two dollars. Finally a full-fledged quarrel came about, and blows soon followed. The two clinched, and during the scuffle Wilson drew a revolver from his pocket and fired. The bullet took effect in the upper portion of the forehead of Egan, who dropped dead without uttering a word. Before anything could be effectually done either to separate them or detain Wilson after he fired, he escaped through the back door and fled southeastward toward the river. Very soon the police were at the scene, and a party of citizens started in pursuit. Hand cars were dispatched east and west on the line, and a team was sent to Crow Wing. The snow in the woods being very deep, it was evident that he would strike for some road. The party who followed him, however, (consisting of Messrs. McInnis, Hamilton, and several other men) overtook him on the river, some two miles below the city, and brought him back. The sad affair occurred at 5 1-2 o’clock in the evening. He had his examination before a justice court at 12 o’clock the same night, and Sheriff Gurrell started with him to St. Paul on the early morning train; he will be kept in the Ramsey County jail, until the sitting of the Court here. The parents of Mr. Egan live in St. Paul, whither his remains were sent. He was a young man, and had for the past year been night dispatcher of engines at the round house. The occurrence cast a deep gloom over our new city, and it is the first death occasioned by the pistol in our history—and we can only pray it will be the last. The prisoner claimed he did not intend to shoot Egan, but that he only drew his pistol to frighten him, and that the discharge of the weapon was accidental. The courts will decide that. (Brainerd Tribune, 15 February 1873, p. 1, c. 4)

SEE: 17 January 1874

14 February

Northern Pacific Railroad
_____

EXTENSION TO THE YELLOWSTONE
_____

RIVER FROM THE SECRETARY OF WAR
_____


On Friday last, the Secretary of War sent to the House of Representatives the following important communication, announcing the proposed letting of the contract for construction of the Northern Pacific between the Missouri River and the Yellowstone, and the necessity of military protection for the workman, &c:

WAR DEPARTMENT, FEB. 14.

Northern Pacific construction on the Great Plains, 1872.
Source: Alfred R. Waud, Minnesota Historical Society
The Secretary of War has the honor to report to the House of Representatives for the information of the Committee on Appropriations, that a telegram has been received from Mr. Cass, President of the Northern Pacific Railroad, that the Company intend to put their road from the Missouri River to the Yellowstone under contract this spring. The work of construction will commence early in summer, and he asks for a sufficient force to be stationed along the line of the proposed road. This will require a strong escort, and will necessitate the establishment of two large posts between the Missouri River and Fort Ellis. General Sheridan reports that our expense for barracks and quarters will be greatly increased, and he thinks it advisable to notify Congress of this fact, so that sufficient additional appropriations may be made for the establishment of these two posts. He says: “The posts to be established will be expensive, and I would respectfully recommend that the fund for barracks and quarters be increased at least in the sum of $250,000.” General Sherman, to whom this subject was referred, says: “This Railroad is a National enterprise, and we are forced to protect the men during its survey and construction through probably the most warlike nations of Indians on the continent, who will fight for every foot of the line. It is a matter of war, requiring near 2,000 troops, who in winter must be sheltered.” I therefore earnestly recommend the appropriation by Congress of the sum of $250,000, to be expended in the erection of two posts, the location of which shall be selected by General Sheridan. I concur with General Sherman in his view that this is a National enterprise, and should receive the support of the Government. It will also prove to be an economical measure, and will tend to the solution of the Indian problem in the Northwestern territory.
WM. M. BELKNAP,
Secretary of War.
(Brainerd Tribune, 22 February 1873, p. 1, c. 7)

NOTE: George Armstrong Custer and the 7th Cavalry are sent to protect the Northern Pacific Railroad from Indian attacks—this would be his first introduction to Sitting Bull and Crazy Horse. The Chief Engineer of the Northern Pacific, Thomas L. Rosser, who is in charge of finding a route across the plains, was Custer’s roommate at West Point. Rosser fought for the Confederacy and Custer for the Union during the Civil War.

SEE: 14 December 1871

SEE: 29 February 1872
SEE: 20 July 1872
SEE: 25 October 1872
SEE: 26 October 1872
SEE: 01 March 1873
SEE: 18 March 1873
SEE: 02 August 1873
SEE: 23 August 1873
SEE: 25 October 1873
SEE: 15 April 1876
SEE: 22 July 1876
SEE: 28 October 1876

SEE: 06 January 1877
SEE: 17 March 1877
SEE: 25 April 1877
SEE: 30 April 1877
SEE: 05 May 1877
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SEE: 17 May 1877
SEE: 26 May 1877
SEE: 06 June 1877
SEE: 21 July 1877
SEE: 11 August 1877
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SEE: 15 September 1877
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SEE: 08 November 1877
SEE: 22 December 1877
SEE: 26 February 1878
SEE: 15 June 1878
SEE: 06 July 1878
SEE: 17 August 1878
SEE: 24 August 1878
SEE: 23 January 1879
SEE: 25 January 1879
SEE: 11 March 1879
SEE: 15 March 1879
SEE: 05 April 1879
SEE: 12 April 1879
SEE: 24 May 1879
SEE: 06 December 1879
SEE: 13 December 1879
SEE: 27 December 1879

15 February
VALUABLE INVENTORS.—We enjoyed a brief but very pleasant visit to the Machine Shops the other day, in company with a friend, and were kindly shown over the interesting portion of the premises by Master Mechanic Wiley, and Mr. Heathcote. The new bolt-making machine, the invention of Mr. Wiley, was a wonder in its workings, and is pronounced by men versed in mechanism, to be fifty per cent ahead of anything of the kind ever yet invented. The wonderful dry kiln, where all the lumber used in the wood-work departments is seasoned, is also a giant’s stride ahead of anything we ever saw before, and is the invention of Mr. Heathcote. We are sorry that our space this week will not permit a detailed description of these two most valuable improvements but we shall take occasion to speak of them more fully in the future. (Brainerd Tribune, 15 February 1873, p. 1, c. 6)

THE NORTHERN PACIFIC.—The following notice of General Manager C. W. Mead and the Northern Pacific is clipped from the Phil’a Enquirer:
“Mr. C. W. Mead, general manager of the Northern Pacific Railroad, is in town. He states that trains have run regularly on schedule time all winter from Duluth to Moorhead on the Red-River-of-the-North without delay or obstruction from snow, except for two days of the great storm, Jan. 8th and 9th, during which time all trains were suspended by orders from headquarters, waiting for the storm to close. On the following day the whole road was opened, and there has been no trouble since. The snow fences have proved a complete success and protect the track perfectly. Mr. Mead will lay thirty miles of track, remaining to reach the Missouri River, in twenty days, and will have a line of boats running to Fort Benton, twelve hundred miles further up the Missouri River, as soon as navigation opens.
“The most friendly relations exist between the Northern and Canadian Pacific roads, and it now appears probable that the construction of the latter road will be begun at Fort Garry, advancing westward from that point, and turning its trade and travel over the Northern Pacific through Duluth on their way to eastern markets”[and through Brainerd.—ED. TRIBUNE.] (Brainerd Tribune, 15 February 1873, p. 1, c. 7)

20 February
THE grand picnic party over at the N. P. Reception House in West Brainerd, on Thursday night, was attended by some 150 ladies and gentlemen, and is said to have been a dazzling affair. We know it could not have been otherwise, and the right kind of timber was there, and no one could be any other way than happy with the gentlemanly Ahrens Brothers as hosts. We regret not being able to be there. (Brainerd Tribune, 22 February 1873, p. 1, c. 3)

22 February
JAS. PETERKIN, engineer, got his hand badly smashed on the road the other day, as we are informed. (Brainerd Tribune, 22 February 1873, p. 1, c. 2)

SEE: 27 July 1875
SEE: 04 August 1875
SEE: 06 August 1875
SEE: 28 August 1875
SEE: 04 September 1875

WHILE the Central and Union Pacific Railroads are often visited with six or eight feet of snow, the Northern Pacific never has more than twenty inches, or a temporary maximum of two feet, and we dare say NEVER WILL experience over two feet of snow at any point on the line in all time to come. (Brainerd Tribune, 22 February 1873, p. 1, c. 6)

CHEERING NEWS.—As will be seen by an article elsewhere, the prospects of the Northern Pacific Railroad, the Northern Pacific country and the Northern Pacific people, are decidedly looking up. To us, however, the news is not unexpected, because we have always had an unlimited stock of faith in the Northern Pacific enterprise, and we don’t believe we have had an ounce too much. We have felt it in our bones that although little checks, temporary delays, etc., might come to pass, yet the great enterprise must and would be pushed through without any delay worthy of mention. The fact of the Northern Pacific Railroad’s being the shortest and most practicable route from ocean to ocean; the fact that, the country traversed by it is, as a whole, the richest in agricultural resources and mineral wealth; the fact that it has less snow in winter than the Central and Union Pacific, and that it is a delightful, direct and cheap route across the continent, are all facts now established and recognized as such, both in this country and Europe. By its construction an almost limitless country of unequaled fertility will be thrown open to settlement, and the Indian problem will be effectually solved, saving the Government a mint of money in a fruitless contention with the Sioux west of the Missouri.
The road is to be pushed westward from the Missouri River this spring, and by the time snow flies again the iron horse will be thundering into the valley of the Yellowstone—seven or eight hundred miles west from here, into the avenues of the National park, and the heart of the Montana gold regions. Thousands of laborers and mechanics will flock hither in a few weeks more, and other thousands of industrious immigrants will pour along the line to choose homes of agricultural wealth from the bosom of the unequaled country along the line of the Northern Pacific Railroad. And so we go. (Brainerd Tribune, 22 February 1873, p. 1, c. 4)

27 February
THAT excessively enterprising ‘news’ journal, the St. Paul Pioneer, repeats about once a month, as a matter of “inside” news of course, that the General offices of the Northern Pacific Railroad are about to be removed from Brainerd to St. Paul. It got that story off on Thursday again, but we happen to be able to assure the public that the ‘news’ man of Pioneer is entirely ignorant of the “lay of the land” in this particular, and that the powers of our great Northern Pacific have no such intention. Brainerd is the loveliest place—and when the Brainerd Branch is completed, will be the most central location—for the general offices of the Northern Pacific—as well as the capital—that could be selected; besides, the efficient corps of officers of the Road have more convenient, richer and more cheerful office rooms here than they could possible obtain in St. Paul. Will the Pioneer please give us a rest on that item of “news.” (Brainerd Tribune, 01 March 1873, p. 1, c. 3)

GENERAL MANAGER MEAD returned to Brainerd again from a business trip to New York, on Thursday; spent Friday here in setting everything to going smoothly, and was off again on Saturday morning. He stands the pressure of business and travel remarkably well, and seems as vigorous, full of life, and withal as pleasant and courteous as ever. General [Manager] Mead is certainly a host within himself in all matters pertaining to the successful management of a giant railroad enterprise. (Brainerd Tribune, 01 March 1873, p. 1, c. 5)

01 March
PERSONAL.—We received a friendly call the other day from those jolly good fellows, Messrs. Howson and Bailey, two members of the firm that own the Brainerd Foundry, and also the big foundry at St. Paul. They will start up their foundry here again in a few weeks, of which our friend Bailey will have charge again, as of yore. Friend Howson had on his store clothes, and we suspicion that under the cloak of “business” he was up quietly looking over the chances or desirability, rather, of representing the St. Paul and Pig’s Eye district in the Legislature as soon as the capital is removed to Brainerd. He seems to have found our boarding houses amply provided, liked our city, and will no doubt, be with us as a legislator. (Brainerd Tribune, 01 March 1873, p. 1, c. 2)

CASH UP AND NO GRUMBLING.—Lyman Bridges returned to Brainerd a few days ago, and with him he brought a small cart load of the root of all evil, with which he paid off every man on the line of the Northern Pacific Railroad to whom he owed a cent. Some $75,000 was thus distributed, and, as a consequence, the people are happy. (Brainerd Tribune, 01 March 1873, p. 1, c. 5)

DANGEROUS ILLNESS.—Mr. Edgerton, Paymaster on the Road, and brother-in-law to our esteemed citizen, Col. R. M. Newport, has, during the past week, been very seriously ill with erysipelas in the head. During the fore part of the week his life was entirely despaired of, and his father’s family sent for. We are pleased to add, however, that his disease took a favorable turn on Wednesday morning, and although he is yet very low, there is strong hope of his recovery. (Brainerd Tribune, 01 March 1873, p. 1, c. 5)

SIGNATURES—given by all to Petition for retention of Doctor Thayer by the R. R. officials; the gentlemanly McGregor in charge of Document. (Brainerd Tribune, 01 March 1873, p. 1, c. 5)

WE are informed that the first installment of the Yeovil colony, composed chiefly of young men, will leave England for this country about the 23d of next month. Their families, and the older members, will follow a month later. They will number one thousand in all, and will settle in the vicinity of Muskoda, on the line of the N. P. R. R. (Brainerd Tribune, 01 March 1873, p. 1, c. 6)

GEN. T. L. ROSSER is to be at the head of the engineering operations on the line of the Northern Pacific during the extensive movements of the coming season. He is a gentleman eminently fitted for that high and responsible position. (Brainerd Tribune, 01 March 1873, p. 1, c. 6)

SEE: 14 December 1871

SEE: 29 February 1872
SEE: 20 July 1872
SEE: 25 October 1872
SEE: 26 October 1872
SEE: 14 February 1873
SEE: 18 March 1873
SEE: 02 August 1873
SEE: 23 August 1873
SEE: 25 October 1873
SEE: 15 April 1876
SEE: 22 July 1876
SEE: 28 October 1876

SEE: 06 January 1877
SEE: 17 March 1877
SEE: 25 April 1877
SEE: 30 April 1877
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SEE: 12 May 1877
SEE: 17 May 1877
SEE: 26 May 1877
SEE: 06 June 1877
SEE: 21 July 1877
SEE: 11 August 1877
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SEE: 22 December 1877
SEE: 26 February 1878
SEE: 15 June 1878
SEE: 06 July 1878
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SEE: 23 January 1879
SEE: 25 January 1879
SEE: 11 March 1879
SEE: 15 March 1879
SEE: 05 April 1879
SEE: 12 April 1879
SEE: 24 May 1879
SEE: 06 December 1879
SEE: 13 December 1879
SEE: 27 December 1879

08 March
REDFIELD, correspondent of the Cincinnati Commercial, who called on us a week or two ago, acknowledged to us that he had been sent on to the Northern Pacific Railroad to write it DOWN, and not to write it up. Well, that individual wrote a letter from Brainerd, and the Commercial containing it is before us. He faithfully fulfilled his mission, so far as TRYING to do as his master bade him. But in doing so, he left truth entirely out of the question, and went in to manufacture lies out of whole cloth to attain the end desired. A more frivolous, contemptible, unscrupulous batch of untruths, and untrue insinuations, calculated to give untrue impressions abroad in regard to the Northern Pacific country, could not be well conceived, and for which the Cincinnati Commercial ought to be damned as an unreliable, unscrupulous, contemptible sheet, unworthy of the dignified position it strives to maintain in journalism. (Brainerd Tribune, 08 March 1873, p. 1, c. 4)

THAT the Northern Pacific and its interests are to be pushed ahead in various ways this season, we have no doubt. But the great long “programme” that has been going the rounds of the papers since the return of General Manager Mead from New York, (and which is credited to the St. Paul Press), we feel warranted in saying, is an unauthorized “plan of operations” on the part of the Press. The reporter who got up that extended “From the Pacific to the Rocky Mountains,” etc., we venture to say never got his information from Mr. Mead, but simply went in on his muscle with simply rumors for a foundation. (Brainerd Tribune, 08 March 1873, p. 1, c. 6)

12 March
NORTHERN PACIFIC DIRECTORS.—At the annual meeting of the stock-holders of the Northern Pacific Railroad, in New York, the 12th inst., the following directors were elected: W. G. Fargo, Geo. W. Cass, R. D. Rice, Chas. B. Wright, W. B. Ogden, J. G. Smith, W. G. Moorhead, A. H. Barney, Wm. Windom, Jno. Stevens, B. P. Cheney, and Albert A. Catlin. (Brainerd Tribune, 15 March 1873, p. 1, c. 2)

15 March
THROUGH TICKETS.—We have omitted to mention before, that the public can now purchase tickets at any station along the line of the Northern Pacific through to all principle points in the Eastern States, and elsewhere. Also, to Manitoba, Fort Benton, Helena, and other points in the Great West. Mr. G. G. Sanborn the efficient General Ticket Agent of the Northern Pacific, is getting his department in the management of our great trans-continental thoroughfare thoroughly systematized, and it is now in perfect working order. We admire Mr. Sanborn’s plain, simple forms of coupons and traveling tickets of all grades, and more than all, his easy, gentlemanly manner of discharging the duties of his somewhat complicated position—which, we presume, however, is as plain as the nose on a man’s face to anyone who understands his business. (Brainerd Tribune, 15 March 1873, p. 1, c. 3)

ARRIVED.—The arrival is chronicled of Mr. R. Rogers, Mr. Sibley and Mr. Lewis and son, from Yeovil, Somerset, England. These gentlemen are the vanguard of the Yeovil colony now organizing in England. They are to settle eight townships in the Red River Valley on the line of the Northern Pacific Railroad. Mr. Rogers is a builder and is here in advance to erect buildings for the accommodation of the Colony. Among other buildings to be erected immediately is a school house to accommodate 100 persons and which will serve as a public room for all purposes until others are built. The Colony will number from one hundred to one hundred and fifty families this spring, and are expected to start from England about the 15th of April. (Brainerd Tribune, 15 March 1873, p. 1, c. 5)

18 March
A. O. ECKELSON, a well known Civil Engineer, of the N. P. R. R., went west on Tuesday morning. He will be in Gen. T. L. Rosser’s department. He has been spending some weeks on the old stamping ground “down East.”
WE noticed, also, the arrival, at Headquarters House, of several gentlemen from St. Paul, Duluth, and various other points. (Brainerd Tribune, 22 March 1873, p. 1, c. 4)

SEE: 14 December 1871

SEE: 29 February 1872
SEE: 20 July 1872
SEE: 25 October 1872
SEE: 26 October 1872
SEE: 14 February 1873
SEE: 01 March 1873
SEE: 02 August 1873
SEE: 23 August 1873
SEE: 25 October 1873
SEE: 15 April 1876
SEE: 22 July 1876
SEE: 28 October 1876

SEE: 06 January 1877
SEE: 17 March 1877
SEE: 25 April 1877
SEE: 30 April 1877
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SEE: 12 May 1877
SEE: 17 May 1877
SEE: 26 May 1877
SEE: 06 June 1877
SEE: 21 July 1877
SEE: 11 August 1877
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SEE: 22 December 1877
SEE: 26 February 1878
SEE: 15 June 1878
SEE: 06 July 1878
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SEE: 25 January 1879
SEE: 11 March 1879
SEE: 15 March 1879
SEE: 05 April 1879
SEE: 12 April 1879
SEE: 24 May 1879
SEE: 06 December 1879
SEE: 13 December 1879
SEE: 27 December 1879

22 March
BUSY times at the Machine and Work Shops of the N. P. R. R., these days. Getting ready for business, you know. (Brainerd Tribune, 22 March 1873, p. 1, c. 4)

INDICATIONS are, that work on the Brainerd and Sauk Rapids Branch Railroad, is to be commenced as early as possible. (Brainerd Tribune, 22 March 1873, p. 1, c. 5)

25 March
ONE hundred English farmers left Liverpool the 25th inst., who intend to settle in Clay and Becker counties, of this State. (Brainerd Tribune, 29 March 1873, p. 1, c. 7)

29 March
THE NORTHERN PACIFIC.—We have reliable information upon the noticeable fact that down in New Hampshire, on a diminutive line of Railroad, only 30 miles long, there has been more money expended in keeping the road open the past winter, than has been expended on the whole line of the Northern Pacific. (Brainerd Tribune, 29 March 1873, p. 1, c. 3)

RESIGNED.—We had heard it intimated on the street that the following resignations were to take place, several days since, but scarcely felt authorized to say so as yet, until reading the following special telegram in the St. Paul Press. We only have time in this issue to say that we, and all others who have had the honor of an acquaintance with these gentlemen, fully endorse the complimentary tone of the dispatch, and, in brief, are most extremely sorry that they have decided to leave us, and the great Northern Pacific enterprise, of which they have ever been three pillars of strength. May God bless them wherever they go. Here is the dispatch:
Brainerd, March 27.—Mr. C. T. Hobart, Superintendent of the Minnesota Division of the Northern Pacific railroad, R. W. Chase, General Freight Agent, and M. L. Allen, Auditor, have resigned their positions, to take effect on April 1st. These gentlemen are all extremely popular, and the news of their resignation occasions general regret. Superintendent Hobart is regarded as one of the best railroad men in the country. Of the causes of their resignation I am not informed. (Brainerd Tribune, 29 March 1873, p. 1, c. 4)

SEE: 24 February 1872
SEE: 16 March 1872
SEE: 15 April 1872
SEE: 27 April 1872
SEE: 04 May 1872
SEE: 25 October 1872
SEE: 16 November 1872
SEE: 14 December 1872
SEE: 01 April 1873
SEE: 05 April 1873
SEE: 29 May 1873
SEE: 31 May 1873

SEE: 17 July 1880

SEE: 17 August 1882
SEE: 05 February 1917


NORTHERN PACIFIC things are moving and spreading for a good earnest season’s work, in completing and extending.
THE early completion of the Brainerd Branch Railroad to Sauk Rapids is a fixed fact. Hurrah for Brainerd! (Brainerd Tribune, 29 March 1873, p. 1, c. 5)

01 April
James Buel Power was appointed agent [01 April 1873] to select lands for the Company in the State of Minnesota inuring to it by virtue of Congressional grants. (Northern Pacific Book of Reference: For the Use of the Directors and Officers of the Company; compiled by E. V. Smalley; New York: E. Wells Sackett & Rankin, Printers and Stationers; 1883, p. 108)

SEE: 05 October 1871
SEE: 03 May 1873

SEE: 01 December 1873
SEE: 27 December 1873
SEE: 10 January 1874
SEE: 06 June 1874
SEE: 12 September 1874
SEE: 28 November 1874
SEE: 06 February 1875
SEE: 20 March 1875
SEE: 12 April 1875
SEE: 07 August 1875
SEE: 09 October 1875
SEE: 19 February 1876
SEE: 22 July 1876
SEE: 07 October 1876
SEE: 25 April 1877
SEE: 14 June 1877
SEE: 04 August 1877
SEE: 06 October 1877
SEE: 23 October 1877
SEE: 02 November 1877
SEE: 18 June 1878
SEE: 20 July 1878
SEE: 06 August 1878
SEE: 21 September 1878
SEE: 28 September 1878
SEE: 10 May 1879
SEE: 05 July 1879
SEE: 30 July 1879
SEE: 27 September 1879
SEE: 18 February 1880
SEE: 21 February 1880
SEE: 28 August 1880
SEE: 31 August 1880
SEE: 04 September 1880
SEE: 16 September 1880
SEE: 09 October 1880
SEE: 09 December 1880
SEE: 25 December 1880
SEE: 17 February 1881
SEE: 21 February 1881
SEE: 26 February 1881
SEE: 09 April 1881
SEE: 13 April 1881
SEE: 23 April 1881
SEE: 19 May 1881
SEE: 11 June 1881
SEE: 23 July 1881
SEE: 01 September 1881
SEE: 03 October 1881
SEE: 06 December 1881
SEE: 30 July 1882
SEE: 02 August 1882
SEE: 05 February 1917

FAREWELL BANQUET TO MR. C. T. HOBART.—At the Headquarters Hotel on Tuesday evening last, there gathered together some fifty of the friends (both railroad men and citizens) of the late Superintendent of the Northern Pacific Railroad—Mr. C. T. Hobart. When we arrived we found all seated at the table in the spacious dining hall, preparatory to commencing active hostilities upon one of the grandest suppers ever spread in Northern Minnesota, and which was being directly supervised by Mr. and Mrs. Dewolf, aided by their efficient corps of assistants. At the head of one of the long tables was seated the venerable Bishop Whipple, and at the other table our esteemed citizen, Dr. S. W. Thayer. A finer looking company of men, would be difficult to find. The gray-haired Father Gurley was also present, and also Rev. Gilfillan. After a hearty supper had been partaken of, Dr. Thayer proposed the health of the retiring Superintendent, by all drinking a glass of pure cold water, and Bishop Whipple responded in a beautiful little address, delivered in his inimitable style and happy application. The Bishop, was followed, in response to loud calls, by Dr. Thayer, Rev. Gurley and Gilfillan, L. P. and Edward White, Messrs. Chase, Allen, Coykendall, and many others. Each had some happy incidents to relate in the history of the great Northern Pacific enterprise with which Mr. Hobart had been so intimately connected from the first, and all paid him high compliments, as a gentleman of noble, manly qualities, and efficiency as a railroad man, whose abilities were so greatly portrayed in the early success and fine condition of the Northern Pacific Railroad. At the close of the grand banquet, Mr. Hobart arose, and in a most feeling address returned the thanks that came direct from his kind nature and warm heart, for so great an ovation in his honor, and paid a high tribute to the many noble men who had from the first so ably seconded him in bringing the Road to its present status among the great thoroughfares of the continent. After he had concluded, all arose, bade him a hearty farewell, and dispersed reflectively and almost sadly to their respective homes.
Mr. Hobart left on the Wednesday morning train for the east, and will, we understand, bring up ere long at Ottawa, Canada, where he has had flattering offers to become connected with important contracts on the Canadian Pacific Railway. Wherever he may go, however, he carries with him the warmest and best wishes of hundreds of true hearts in Brainerd and along the line of the Northern Pacific. (Brainerd Tribune, 05 April 1873, p. 1, c. 5)

HOBART:

SEE: 24 February 1872
SEE: 16 March 1872
SEE: 15 April 1872
SEE: 27 April 1872
SEE: 04 May 1872
SEE: 25 October 1872
SEE: 16 November 1872
SEE: 14 December 1872
SEE: 29 March 1873
SEE: 05 April 1873
SEE: 29 May 1873
SEE: 31 May 1873

SEE: 17 July 1880

SEE: 17 August 1882
SEE: 05 February 1917

WHITE:
SEE: 20 September 1870
SEE: 10 May 1873
SEE: 06 August 1875


05 April
NEW APPOINTMENTS.—The vacancies occasioned by the resignations of Messrs. Hobart, Chase and Allen have been filled as follows: J. H. Sullivan, Superintendent Minnesota Division; W. S. Alexander, General Freight Agent, and L. M. Ford, Auditor. The two latter gentlemen we have not the pleasure of being acquainted with, but understand them to be excellent men for the positions to which they have been appointed, and we welcome them on behalf of our good citizens to a place among us here in the City of Pines.
Mr. J. H. Sullivan is well known on the line as having heretofore been General Manager Mead’s private Secretary, and although he has not been in a position to become extensively known along the line, as yet, still he has formed scores of warm friendships hereaway, and many will rejoice to congratulate him upon his promotion. He is a well versed railroad man, a courteous gentleman and will be a faithful officer of the Road. We wish him the greatest success in his new role, for we know he will strive hard to not only deserved success as Superintendent, but to prove himself wholly worthy of the confidence and high esteem of the thousands with whom he must come in contact, in discharge of his duties. Here’s to our friend Sullivan. (Brainerd Tribune, 05 April 1873, p. 1, c. 2)

SEE: 24 February 1872
SEE: 16 March 1872
SEE: 15 April 1872
SEE: 27 April 1872
SEE: 04 May 1872
SEE: 25 October 1872
SEE: 16 November 1872
SEE: 14 December 1872
SEE: 29 March 1873
SEE: 01 April 1873
SEE: 29 May 1873
SEE: 31 May 1873

SEE: 17 July 1880

SEE: 17 August 1882
SEE: 05 February 1917


TO THE LOCOMOTIVE ENGINEERS.—Although we have most of it in type we are compelled to leave the article on “The Strike,” handed us yesterday, over till our next issue—owing to its extreme length and the late hour at which it was received. It will appear in full next week, which is the best we can do, even after making a big effort to get it in for “the boys” this week. (Brainerd Tribune, 05 April 1873, p. 1, c. 3)

The “Removal” Rumor.


There has been in circulation the past few days—aided and abetted by the St. Paul papers—a rumor that the General Offices of the Northern Pacific Railroad were, ere long, to be removed from Brainerd to St. Paul. Right here we put in our “veto” on the policy of any such step on the part of the managers of our great railroad across the continent, and if our reasons after being offered and considered are not good ones, then let them drop; but otherwise, we ask that they be considered favorably. Even without the Brainerd Branch we cannot see for the life of us a sufficiently abundant amount of reasons why they should be removed to St. Paul, and, certainly not, with. We say so, not entirely unmindful or ignorant of the reasons adduced in favor of their removal, but after being assured by many of the officers that they experience scarcely any difficulty in having their offices located in Brainerd, and would experience no inconvenience after the Branch road was completed. It seems perfectly rational to us that, with one headquarters abroad (in New York), the other should be somewhere on the line of the road. Now that such fine offices have been provided at Brainerd for their accommodation, and they are all snugly ensconced here in our beautiful and healthful location, it seems diametrically opposed to the best interests of the road to take them away. Here they are at the natural business center of the line; right in the heart of their great timber supply country, on the Mississippi, where it is convenient to make all sorts of contracts, equip outfits, and settle claims of every character; right at the junction of the St. Paul branch with their own line, convenient for the transaction of all Manitoba business, with telegraph wires for communication in all directions. To remove their Minnesota headquarters off the line, and take it away to St. Paul, a hundred and fifty miles from their main line, would seem at least like a partial abandonment of the enterprise, and stagger confidence among the masses now along the road, who are the groundwork to all future success of the enterprise. The removal of the General Offices from Brainerd—away off from the Northern Pacific Railroad proper—would not be regretted in Brainerd, nor any one point on the line alone, but would send a thrill of doubt and regret along the entire road, felt equally everywhere. By their continuance here, their natural location, every individual and every valuable enterprise would be stimulated to further exertion in developing the resources of the vast country from Duluth to the Missouri River. If, AFTER HAVING BEEN HERE, they are drawn away, and we have no general headquarters nearer the line than St. Paul, the feeling and results will certainly be the opposite, and a wet blanket will be thrown around the present great energy everywhere exhibited along the line. We certainly can see no tangible reasons why they should be taken away; and knowing what we do about the feeling aroused by the suspicion among every class along the road, and being satisfied from our knowledge thereof that no good would result from such a step, we feel sure the judgement of the Company would be in error in making it. In going to St. Paul we cannot see that they have any friendships to cement, no valuable communities to encourage and strengthen by their presence, nor any interests of any kind, that would be the better subserved. While, on the other hand, they would weaken confidence where it should be strengthened, and go away from friendships which are now daily growing into one common interest—each becoming a power to the other, (and equally dependent upon each other), besides showing in the act an uninviting aspect to the outer world. We hope, with every man now on the Line, the Company may consider well the INFLUENCE of such a step before making it. (Brainerd Tribune, 05 April 1873, p. 1, c. 4)

12 April
The first installment of about seventy-five men of the Yeovil or English Colony, who are to locate out at Hawley, on the line of the road, are expected here on Monday evening, and will complete their journey on Tuesday. They are to spend tomorrow, Sunday, at the Reception House in Duluth. Mr. Lyman P. White, our efficient and kind-hearted Townsite Agent, has been out to Hawley with a crew of men this week, putting up a house and tents for their comfortable and free accommodation until they can build for themselves. He, in behalf of the Land Company, is and will do everything in his power to make our English friends comfortable, contented and at home among us, until they can get their own little domiciles all fixed up for the reception of the dear ones who will soon follow them. (Brainerd Tribune, 12 April 1873, p. 1, c. 2)

Our Manufacturing Interests.


WE have what we consider reliable information that the big gang sawmill so much talked of, will unquestionably be built here this season. The Townsite Company, we are informed, have interested themselves in earnest concerning the VERY IMPORTANT matter of starting Brainerd’s manufacturing interests fairly and immediately on foot. In doing so, quickly, they will not only strike the very key note of their own rapid success, but they will, by improving the great natural advantages of Brainerd as a manufacturing city, give a new impetus to this and every town along the line. All the people west of us are naturally looking to Brainerd as their supply headquarters for lumber, timber, shingles, lath, and all kinds of building materials, with, at no distant day, wooden ware, plows and other agricultural implements; and Brainerd is the natural place on the whole line for all these classes of manufactories. The country west of here is already demanding an immense amount of lumber, etc., that ought to all be furnished from this point, and were there half a dozen extensive additional mills and other factories put up here this summer they need not wait an hour from now henceforth for profitable business.
The Brainerd Lumber and Manufacturing Co. started up their large and effective establishment on Tuesday last, and expect to have their hands more than full of business, even with their greatly enlarged facilities over last year. They will furnish everything form a palatial ready-made residence or commodious store building down to the smallest item used in any building—in its equipment and finish from corner-stone to ridge-pole or the weather-vane of a spire. Their enterprise is sure to receive the rich reward it deserves.
The extensive mills of the Northern Pacific Manufacturing Co., down at the river are also running constantly, in a vain endeavor to supply a hungry market, and so it will be with half a dozen more if built this season, and all other manufactories will be needed in proportion, to supply the Northern Pacific country. Let us have them. (Brainerd Tribune, 12 April 1873, p. 1, c. 2)

26 April
ABOUT AGAIN.—Col. R. M. Newport, the deservedly popular and efficient Assistant Treasurer of the Northern Pacific, at these headquarters, is at his post again, after a fortnight’s illness with pleurisy. The Colonel having been one of us for so long a time now, has come to be one of Brainerd’s most valued citizens; and there is no one missed more, when he is absent from our business circles, than he. During his indisposition, however, the cares of his office were ably taken charge of by his gentlemanly assistants—Messrs. Edgerton, Davidson and Worman. (Brainerd Tribune, 26 April 1873, p. 1, c. 6)

SEE: 17 August 1872
SEE: 12 December 1874
SEE: 19 December 1874
SEE: 09 October 1875
SEE: 29 January 1876
SEE: 19 February 1876
SEE: 03 June 1876
SEE: 25 April 1877
SEE: 06 June 1877
SEE: 09 June 1877
SEE: 14 June 1877
SEE: 06 October 1877
SEE: 07 February 1880
SEE: 17 February 1881
SEE: 26 February 1881
SEE: 17 March 1881
SEE: 09 April 1881
SEE: 13 April 1881
SEE: 30 April 1881
SEE: 19 May 1881
SEE: 23 July 1881
SEE: 11 February 1882
SEE: 18 February 1882
SEE: 30 July 1882
SEE: 05 February 1917

03 May
NORTHERN PACIFIC IMMIGRATION.—We received a very pleasant call from Mr. J. B. Power, General Agent of the Land Department of the Northern Pacific Railroad. Mr. Power we found to be an exceedingly pleasant gentleman, and chock full of good, practical ideas befitting to his position. He had just been out looking after the interests and locating the Yeovil colonists, in the beautiful region between Audubon and the Buffalo River. He informs us that they are nearly all permanently settled on lands of their own choice, and are now highly delighted with the country. Mr. Power met, at this place, the committee of another English Colony—who came on in advance to look the country over along the line, with a view to selecting a location for their colony, another detachment of whom will arrive here during the present month. The Committee will select a site, during their trip west with Mr. Power, and will have a reception house put up at some convenient point on the line immediately, which will accommodate the first detachment soon expected, till they have time to build. Farmers with them will also put in crops as early as possible. It is called the Furness Colony. (Brainerd Tribune, 03 May 1873, p. 1, c. 5)

SEE: 05 October 1871
SEE: 01 April 1873

SEE: 01 December 1873
SEE: 27 December 1873
SEE: 10 January 1874
SEE: 06 June 1874
SEE: 12 September 1874
SEE: 28 November 1874
SEE: 06 February 1875
SEE: 20 March 1875
SEE: 12 April 1875
SEE: 07 August 1875
SEE: 09 October 1875
SEE: 19 February 1876
SEE: 22 July 1876
SEE: 07 October 1876
SEE: 25 April 1877
SEE: 14 June 1877
SEE: 04 August 1877
SEE: 06 October 1877
SEE: 23 October 1877
SEE: 02 November 1877
SEE: 18 June 1878
SEE: 20 July 1878
SEE: 06 August 1878
SEE: 21 September 1878
SEE: 28 September 1878
SEE: 10 May 1879
SEE: 05 July 1879
SEE: 30 July 1879
SEE: 27 September 1879
SEE: 18 February 1880
SEE: 21 February 1880
SEE: 28 August 1880
SEE: 31 August 1880
SEE: 04 September 1880
SEE: 16 September 1880
SEE: 09 October 1880
SEE: 09 December 1880
SEE: 25 December 1880
SEE: 17 February 1881
SEE: 21 February 1881
SEE: 26 February 1881
SEE: 09 April 1881
SEE: 13 April 1881
SEE: 23 April 1881
SEE: 19 May 1881
SEE: 11 June 1881
SEE: 23 July 1881
SEE: 01 September 1881
SEE: 03 October 1881
SEE: 06 December 1881
SEE: 30 July 1882
SEE: 02 August 1882
SEE: 05 February 1917

08 May
SINGULAR DEATH.—On Thursday morning about 8 o’clock, John Anderson, boss repairer and oiler of the cars at the depot, was found by one of his associates in a small building close by the track, used for their tools, etc., in a large kettle of water, drowned. The building, as before stated, is used as a depot for the necessary repairing supplies, and as a headquarters for the night and day watchmen. In the back room is a furnace with a very large kettle, used for heating water, and the kettle was nearly full of water, which was at the time warm, but not hot. Mr. Anderson came at half past five in the morning, and relieved the night watchman, who says he last saw Anderson in the front room at the time indicated. Two or three hours later, one of his assistants in the business of attending the repairs, went to the house and returned in a moment reporting to Superintendent Sullivan that he had found Anderson drowned in the big kettle. Mr. Sullivan and others at once repaired to the building, and, as reported, found Anderson lying across the edge of the kettle on his back, with his head and shoulders down in the kettle, his hands elevated out of the water, and his legs and lower part of the body hanging outside with his feet off the ground. He was taken out and laid on a board in the front room, and Doctor S. W. Thayer, the Coroner, notified at once. The Doctor, though laid up with an injured leg, made out to get to the scene—which was only a few rods from his office in the Headquarters Hotel—and viewed the body, and ordered a jury impanelled, for the purpose of holding an inquest. After a thorough examination into the case the jury returned a verdict [here we left off until the jury would return a verdict; but after holding our paper open as long as possible, we fail to get it. The Jury are still in session and from all we can learn, the matter stands about even between suicide and murder.]
The following is a list of effects found in his trunk:
Currency $196.15; Certificate of Deposit on National Marine Bank, St. Paul, $400; one note for $100; one note for $50; one watch, with letters, papers, etc.
Mr. Anderson was of Swedish birth, about forty years of age, but had no family as far as is known here. He was highly esteemed by all who knew him, as an honest, faithful man. (Brainerd Tribune, 10 May 1873, p. 1, c. 5)

SEE: 17 May 1873

10 May
THE Headquarters Hotel is full of guests these days, and they are always pleased with the excellent treatment and good fare they receive. Friend Dewolf knows how to keep a hotel, and he has an assistant in the edible department, in the person of Mr. James Bagley, Steward of the hotel, who just exactly understands his business in its every detail, and he is ever gentlemanly and faithful in the discharge of his duties. (Brainerd Tribune, 10 May 1873, p. 1, c. 2)

UNCLE ED. WHITE has resigned his position of Master of Bridges on the Northern Pacific. He has been on the line two years, without losing a day or an hour. This may be classed as sticking to one’s business. (Brainerd Tribune, 10 May 1873, p. 1, c. 3)

SEE: 20 September 1870
SEE: 01 April 1873
SEE: 06 August 1875


THE railing and new walk on the railroad bridge across the Mississippi at this point is a big thing. West Brainerd is fast becoming a fashionable resort for we city swells, and others, now that a fine promenade has been secured by the new walk on the bridge. (Brainerd Tribune, 10 May 1873, p. 1, c. 5)

17 May
THE track this side of Bismarck, on the Northern Pacific, is now being put down at the rate of two miles per day. Inside of two weeks the trains will be running through to the Missouri. (Brainerd Tribune, 17 May 1873, p. 1, c. 2)

THE verdict of the Coroner’s Jury, in the case of John Anderson, who was found in a kettle of water at the oil house, as referred to in last week’s TRIBUNE, was, “Come to his death at the hands of some person or person, to the jury unknown.” (Brainerd Tribune, 17 May 1873, p. 1, c. 3)

SEE: 08 May 1873

24 May
WE have heard it intimated that Maj. Geo. H. Smith, present Train Dispatcher of the Minnesota Division, is to be appointed Superintendent of the new Dakota Division of the Northern Pacific Railroad. Certainly his appointment would give the widest and most perfect satisfaction, both among railroad men and the people at large, and would be an eminently well deserved promotion. (Brainerd Tribune, 24 May 1873, p. 1, c. 5)

THE Northern Pacific Railroad Company has given formal notice that the success of the company has been such that its loan, paying 7.30 per cent interest, will be limited to $30,000,000 of which $21,000,000 have already been issued. After the remaining nine millions of bonds are sold the company will issue only six per cent bonds. (Brainerd Tribune, 24 May 1873, p. 1, c. 6)

29 May
PRESENTATION TO MR. C. T. HOBART.—It was our good fortune, on Thursday evening, to be present at one of the most pleasant “surprise parties” we ever attended. Our friend, C. T. Hobart, Esq., late Superintendent of the Minnesota Division N. P. R. R., was the recipient of a magnificent present, on the occasion referred to, the gift being a diamond Maltese cross—emblematical of a high degree in the Masonic order—which cost the snug sum of $450.00. The occasion took place in the office of Dr. S. W. Thayer, where quite a number of the friends of Mr. Hobart were notified to meet at 8 o'clock. When all had assembled, Mr. L. B. Perry arose and addressed Mr. Hobart as follows:
“Mr. Hobart—I have the honor of having been selected by the employees of the Northern Pacific Railroad, and a few of your many personal friends in Brainerd, to present you with this diamond cross. It is given as a token of their high appreciation of your character as a gentleman, of your services in your late position, and of their personal respect for, and attachment to you during the period we have been associated together on this road. Please accept it in remembrance of us, and as an earnest [expression] of our best wishes for your happiness, prosperity and usefulness, always!”
Mr. Hobart, between the sensations of surprise and thankfulness for so beautiful and costly a token from such a source, could scarce find utterance for the volume of thanks he felt in his heart. Yet, he did return his thanks in a most feeling manner to the friendly donors, both present and absent, and particularly requested to be remembered to any and all whom he might not be able to meet and thank in person. Mr. Hobart then reverted at some length to the experiences of the past two years on the Northern Pacific, and the address was as appropriate as it was earnest; he paid the highest compliment to all the employees of the road, both present and past, and to our citizens here, as well as to all persons now connected with this grand continental enterprise; and expressed his warmest wishes for the happiness in the future of all his many friends along the line, and the final grand success of the Northern Pacific Railroad, of which he has had the honor of being one of the earliest attachés.
After a most agreeable hour or two more, the happy gathering dispersed, but not until they requested Mr. Hobart to ornament his shirt bosom with the princely gift; made doubly precious to him because, in its sparkling beauty, it represented the character of friendship which made him its possessor—a friendship true, and pure as itself, and both of the first water. (Brainerd Tribune, 31 May 1873, p. 1, c. 5)

SEE: 24 February 1872
SEE: 16 March 1872
SEE: 15 April 1872
SEE: 27 April 1872
SEE: 04 May 1872
SEE: 25 October 1872
SEE: 16 November 1872
SEE: 14 December 1872
SEE: 29 March 1873
SEE: 01 April 1873
SEE: 05 April 1873
SEE: 31 May 1873

SEE: 17 July 1880

SEE: 17 August 1882
SEE: 05 February 1917


31 May
PERSONAL.—Thos. H. Canfield, President of the L. S. & P. S. Co., was in town most of the week, and left for the east again yesterday.
Gen’l. Cass, President of the Northern Pacific Railroad, spent a few days in Brainerd, and along the line, this week. We are glad to welcome Mr. Cass to a second visit to the great enterprise over which he presides, and hope he may make his visits more frequent hereafter. His presence is stimulating to all the thousands of good people who have cast their lot and fortune with that of the Northern Pacific, and he is ever welcome among us. (Brainerd Tribune, 31 May 1873, p. 1, c. 4)

IN FINE CONDITION.—The Minnesota Division of the Northern Pacific Railroad is now in as fine condition as any road in the west—smooth, firm, and sound as a nut, with first-class rolling stock of all kinds. Superintendent Sullivan, too, is diligent and indefatigable in his watchfulness and care to keep it so. No locking the stable after the horse is stolen, with friend Sullivan. (Brainerd Tribune, 31 May 1873, p. 1, c. 4)

A NEW brand of cigars, called the N. P. R. R., to arrive at the New Le Bon Ton. It is elegant and fragrant. To smokers:—A word to the wise is sufficient. (Brainerd Tribune, 31 May 1873, p. 1, c. 5)

...This church [Episcopal] was the first built in Brainerd, and is said to be the finest wooden Episcopal church edifice in the Diocese. Its cost—now all paid off—has been very nearly $5,000; Mr. Hopkins, of Plattsburgh, was the architect; the subscription was first started on the 7th of November, 1870, in the office of C. T. Hobart, who procured most of the subscriptions, and who personally superintended every part of its construction, and without whose indefatigable energy in procuring subscriptions and carrying on the work, the church could not have been built. The subscription was headed by Thos. H. Canfield, President of the L. S. & P. S. Land Co., with a subscription of some $1,800; the church was completed in August, 1871, and has since been beautifully furnished and appropriately decorated. (Brainerd Tribune, 31 May 1873, p. 1, c. 6)

NOTE: C. T. Hobart and Thos. H. Canfield were both employees of the Northern Pacific Railroad.

SEE: 24 February 1872
SEE: 16 March 1872
SEE: 15 April 1872
SEE: 27 April 1872
SEE: 04 May 1872
SEE: 25 October 1872
SEE: 16 November 1872
SEE: 14 December 1872
SEE: 29 March 1873
SEE: 01 April 1873
SEE: 05 April 1873
SEE: 29 May 1873

SEE: 17 July 1880

SEE: 17 August 1882
SEE: 05 February 1917


IMPORTANT NOTICE.
_____


THE undersigned would hereby give notice to the people of Brainerd that he forbids them from strewing their offal and refuse matter of whatever kind, about over any part of the property of the Townsite Company, and also gives notice that persons having any refuse matter they wish to hand off, will be informed of the proper place of deposit by applying to him; i. e. in the ravine at the east end of Juniper Street, where the road has been graded and made convenient for unloading, etc.
L. P. WHITE,
Agent, L. S. & P. S. Co.
(Brainerd Tribune, 31 May 1873, p. 1, c. 7)

[From the TRIBUNE EXTRA of Saturday last.]


The General Offices to be Removed to St. Paul or
Minneapolis—In a Horn.


BRAINERD, MINN., May 31, 1873


PRESIDENT CASS, of the Northern Pacific Railroad, returned last evening from the west, and was waited upon by Mayor E. H. Bly, who stated to President Cass that he had been requested by several of our citizens to call upon him and ask the truth in reference to the reports continually being circulated by the St. Paul and Minneapolis papers that the General Offices of the road were to be removed from Brainerd to one or the other of those cities. Mr. Cass very promptly, and in the most emphatic manner, assured Mr. Bly that such a thing had never been dreamed of at the New York Headquarters; that these stories had originated in St. Paul and Minneapolis; that no such intention was entertained by the Northern Pacific Company, and that it WAS the intention of the Company TO KEEP THE GENERAL OFFICES AT BRAINERD—on the line of the road.
Will the intensely enterprising(!) and reliable(!) journals of St. Paul and Minneapolis please stuff this bit of information into their cobb-pipes and smoke it? and then give us a rest on “removals.”
P. S.—The Directors of the St. Paul & Pacific Railroad hold an important meeting in St. Paul on the 11th of June, at which meeting it is expected arrangements will be made to complete the Brainerd & Sauk Rapids Branch Railroad, forthwith.
We predict that from and after the first of July, Brainerd will experience a more solid and continuous prosperity than ever before, and that, commencing with early autumn, our streets will resound with business and industry, that will change only from good to better for years to come. Our beautiful and bountiful businesses, our General and Division Railroad Headquarters, our mammoth Machine and Car Shops, Finishing Mills, and other Factories within our city just as full of genuine western enterprise and No. 1 men as a nut is full of meat! Who says ”dull!” Git cost?
Another P. S.—The grand mill-site at the foot of the River Switch, is likely to be improved ere long by putting a $50,000 gang saw mill, planing mill, bucket factory, etc., thereon, which will only be the first gigantic manufacturing institutions of a dozen or more that will be howling in the city inside the next two years.
Still another P. S.—Brainerd holds out the greatest number, and the most desirable attractions to the tourist, to the man of leisure, to the invalid, to the sportsman, to the lovers of grand natural oddities, to families and all others, of any other place in the United States. We already have fine private and public hotel accommodations, and just as soon as the Brainerd Branch Railroad is completed, thousands of visitors can come here from St. Paul in five or six hours—passing up a beautiful and romantic valley, and landing in a young city and among a people they will be very loth to leave.
Concluding P. S.—St. Paul and Minneapolis papers will please do themselves the honor of publishing the above FACTS, and they will be partially forgiven by
Yours truly,
M. C. RUSSELL,
Editor Brainerd Tribune.
(Brainerd Tribune, 07 June 1873, p. 1, c.’s 6 & 7)

03 June
The Brainerd Tribune is out with an extra containing an account of an interview between Mayor Bly of that city and President Cass of the Northern Pacific railroad, in regard to the moving of the general offices of the road to St. Paul. In this interview President Cass says: “The company have no idea of moving their headquarters from their present location at Brainerd.” The early completion of the road to Minneapolis via St. Cloud is also predicted. Brainerd is jubilant over the news. (Minneapolis Tribune, 03 June 1873, p. 2)

04 June
The Minneapolis Tribune of the 4th inst. says that information has been officially received in that city to the effect that the Northern Pacific R. R. thirty million seven and three-tenths loan has been finally closed out, a New York syndicate having just subscribed for the nine millions that remained unsold at a recent date. This makes a thorough financial success of this loan, and while placing funds at the disposal of the road for construction, strengthens its credit very materially. This entire thirty millions has been taken at home and by our own people, which fact cannot fail of being duly appreciated should the company ever seek negotiations abroad.
The completion of the road to the Missouri river crossing—which is now an accomplished fact—is a matter of congratulation, especially to Minnesota, as it seems evident that the State is to be generally benefitted thereby. The indications now are that the road will be pushed immediately forward across the Missouri, at least as far as the coal fields, and that by another season we shall be in direct communication with those immense mines of wealth. The present management of this road seems to be energetic and able, and to be in entire sympathy with the great Northwest. There was a time it was somewhat embarrassed, but never so much so as represented. It has paid nearly every dollar that it owed in this State, and what little is due will soon be liquidated from the proceeds of the loan just closed. (Brainerd Tribune, 14 June 1873, p. 1, c. 7)

07 June

This may be a view of the boarding house built by the Northern Pacific in east Brainerd near the shops in 1873.
Source: F. A. Taylor
THE company’s beautiful new hotel building, up near the machine shops, over the “big ravine,” is to be opened up for the reception of guests and regular boarders in a few days, and will be under the charge of Mr. Whitaker, an experienced man in the business. We are very glad this fine structure is to be put into operation; it is beautifully situated, and will make a delightful home for all who have no home of their own. (Brainerd Tribune, 07 June 1873, p. 1, c. 4)


10 June
General Alfred Howe Terry, military commander of the Dakota Territory from 1866 to 1869 and again from 1872 to 1886. He was Custer's commanding General in the Dakota Territory, ca. Unknown.
Source: Unknown
Gen’l. [Alfred Howe] Terry and staff passed west on the road, Tuesday last. He goes to Fort Lincoln, and will accompany the great Northern Pacific surveying expedition to the Yellowstone.
General Manager Mead went west on Tuesday last, and our friend, Superintendent Sullivan, has also been west most of the week. (Brainerd Tribune, 14 June 1873, p. 1, c. 6)

NOTE: In 1873, the 7th Cavalry under General Alfred Howe Terry, including Lieutenant Colonel George Armstrong Custer, would be charged with protecting the Northern Pacific Railroad Survey as it moved along the Yellowstone investigating a route for the railroad. The Lakota, among other tribes, took particular issue with the construction of the railroad. Soon, the Lakotas were attacking survey sites regularly. While neither party realized it at the time, this would be the first contact between Sitting Bull, Crazy Horse and Custer.

27 June
HORRIBLE.—We stop the press to say that last night, Mr. John Wilham, of this place, who was braking on a freight train, fell under the cars, and was literally torn to pieces. He has been in the tailoring business here for a year past, and was a highly esteemed gentleman. (Brainerd Tribune, 28 June 1873, p. 1, c. 3)

28 June
ROAD BREAKS.—The recent heavy and frequent rains have, in several places between here and Wadena, endangered the track of the railroad, and in one or two of them the track was washed out during the past week. A freight train got ditched last Saturday night, and one on Monday evening last. No one was injured, however, although considerable damage was done to the engines and half a dozen box cars. On our way out on Monday, we found our friend, Superintendent Sullivan, at one of the breaks, with a large crew of men, working like beaver in the mud and water, repairing the track and getting the engine and cars out of the slough of despond. Mr. Sullivan is a patient, pushing man, and when work is to be done, he is there to do it; and it is owing to his untiring energy, night and day, immediately after the accidents, that the regular trains have been kept right on time all the while; which we should think, must have taken big work in the instance referred to, judging from the ugly looking gap made by the torrent of water. (Brainerd Tribune, 28 June 1873, p. 1, c. 3)

12 July
OUR good friend, M. C. Kimberley, Esq., who has long been Chief Engineer of the Minnesota Division N. P. R. R., has recently had the Dakota Division placed under his charge as Chief Engineer. His many friends are pleased at this mark of appreciation for his valuable services on the Northern Pacific, but hope the labor and responsibility will not prove an overwork. We believe, however, that he is assisted on the Dakota Division by Mr. M. P. Martin, as fine a gentleman and faithful a man as any on the line. (Brainerd Tribune, 12 July 1873, p. 1, c. 5)

19 July
“The Furness Colony, the advance guard of which passed through our city early in the summer, have purchased 40,000 acres of land at Wadena, on the N. P. Railroad, and are putting up a reception house of their own, which is about finished. They have engaged a Congregationalist minister from Scotland—who will arrive next month. Two hundred colonists are now on their way, and a few have already arrived.—[St. Paul Pioneer. (Brainerd Tribune, 19 July 1873, p. 1, c. 4)

21 July
SAD ACCIDENT.—A young man by the name of William Dowell, who has for a year past, and up to two weeks ago, been clerk in the freight office with Mr. Canfield here, met with a most painful accident on Monday last, out near Detroit [Lakes]. Not long since he went to braking on the road, and in an attempt to jump off the platform while the train was backing up, he slipped and fell, and one of his feet was run over and crushed by the wheels of the cars. He was brought to Brainerd, and is now under the care of Doctor S. W. Thayer, and is doing as well as could be expected. Most of his foot had to be amputated. Mr. Dowell has the deep sympathy of his many friends here, in his great misfortune, who stand ready to do anything in their power to ease his condition. (Brainerd Tribune, 26 July 1873, p. 1, c. 6)

SEE: 06 December 1873

24 July
ONE of the most pleasant social hops imaginable came off Thursday evening at the Headquarters Hotel. All present enjoyed themselves very much, and voted it one of the best parties of the year. (Brainerd Tribune, 25 July 1873, p. 1, c. 5)

26 July
TO LEAVE US.—It is with the profoundest regret that all of our good people learn of the intention of Dr. Samuel W. Thayer to return to his home in Burlington, Vermont, there to take up his residence again for the future. Doctor Thayer has occupied the position of Medical Director of the Northern Pacific ever since the organization, and has had charge, in person, of the Medical and Surgical Department. He is known and greatly esteemed along the line, but as his headquarters have been with us in Brainerd, we feel the loss more directly here. We could say none too much in praise of Dr. Thayer, either as a kind, generous, noble-hearted man, or a medical gentleman of the ripest experience. Hundreds of poor men on the line owe him today for the life and health they are now enjoying, while the maimed live to thank him for their comparatively happy condition through his attentive kindness and great skill as a surgeon. And after all this, Brainerd will lose, in the departure of Dr. Thayer, one of its most valuable citizens and most enterprising friends. All classes here have grown to more than esteem the venerable Doctor, and his scores of acts of generosity among the poorer classes, have endeared him to all—his charity is boundless. The heartfelt wishes of every man, woman and child in Brainerd, for his prosperity and the continuance of his valuable life, will accompany him to his old New England home. It will be long ere his place can be filled, in the hearts of our people, or as a valuable citizen in our community. (Brainerd Tribune, 26 July 1873, p. 1, c. 4)

GONE.—It is with regret that we learn of the removal to St. Paul of our good friend, J. A. Hannaford, Esq., who has for a year past been chief clerk in the Freight Department of the Northern Pacific at this place. All the good “boys” at the General Office building are mourning his loss, and hosts of his other friends in Brainerd are similarly engaged—ourself among the number. Now, J. A., don’t forget your country cousins while glittering about the dazzling boulevards of the metropolis, but just come up occasionally; and if we don’t give you a lively clatter, there’s no snakes in Cork, that’s all. (Brainerd Tribune, 26 July 1873, p. 1, c. 4)

The offices of the Northern Pacific Railway are moved to St. Paul. J. M. Hannaford, until then a clerk in Brainerd, is promoted and transferred. Since then he has advanced steadily. For several years he was president of the road, and is now vice-chairman of the board of directors. (Brainerd’s Half Century, Ingolf Dillan, General Printing Company, Minneapolis, Minnesota: 1923, p. 20)

First Northern Pacific Depot, standing on the southeast corner of Washington [Main] and Sixth Streets originally housed the headquarters of the NP Railroad, it burns down in 1917, ca. 1890.
Source: Unknown
The Headquarters of the Northern Pacific Railroad move from Brainerd to St. Paul, Minnesota. (100th Anniversary, Aurora Lodge, No. 100—A. F. & A. M., 1973; containing 75th Anniversary History, 1947, Carl Zapffe, p. 7)

NOTE: I’m not so sure that Dillan and Zapffe (who undobutedly copied his information from Dillan) is correct about the moving of the headquarters to St. Paul in 1873, the only person mentioned in the newspaper of the time is Hannaford.

The officers of the Ida Stockdale (the Northern Pacific transfer steamer on the Missouri River at Bismarck) have been relieved, owing to the fact that the boat was transferred to the Coulson Line. Capt. Haycock, Mate Ellet Haycock, Clerk ---- Haycock and Engineer Pond all passed through here this week on their way to St. Paul. (Brainerd Tribune, 26 July 1873, p. 1, c. 4)

The Northern Pacific shops in Brainerd in 1873.
Source: F. A. Taylor
THE MACHINE SHOPS.—The 180 men at the machine, car and paint shops of the Northern Pacific, at Brainerd, as now organized under the superintendence of Master Mechanic R. B. Small, and his able assistants are without flattery, as orderly, courteous and intelligent a set of men as we ever saw together. They are composed of various nationalities,—Americans largely predominating, we believe—are the best workmen that could be procured, in the various branches, and are gathered together from the manufacturing establishments of the country. They work ten hours a day, during which time no needless conversation is carried on, and the various departments are tidy and neat as a reading room. Visitors always feel at home among them, and naught but the most courteous and gentlemanly conduct is observable. A large proportion of the workmen are extraordinarily intelligent and well-informed, and are posted on all the popular topics of the times, taking and reading a large number of newspapers and other periodicals. A visit to the machine shops is very enjoyable, and is indulged in the the hundreds of sight-seers who come to Brainerd. (Brainerd Tribune, 26 July 1873, p. 1, c. 5)

THE Brainerd and St. Vincent Railroad Branches are probably to be built this fall; we think they will be; we state this just to relieve the public; we have said so several times; said they would be built last fall; but they weren’t; we never thought we could tell a lie, until we commenced saying the Brainerd Branch was going to be built; but we are a success; the Branch will certainly be built; just what day, we cannot consistently promise, but it will probably be the day after the work has all been done in its construction, except one day’s work; we have bet a new hat that the Branch will be built before Dec. 1st; come around and see us on Dec. 2d, and if we are wearing a new roof, you can calculate the Branch is built; if the other chap is seen reclining under our roof, you can draw your own conclusions; but we think the Branch will be built, and the reason we think so, is because we do. (Brainerd Tribune, 26 July 1873, p. 1, c. 5)

THE western terminus of the Northern Pacific Railroad has at last been officially fixed at TACOMA, on Puget Sound. The whole population of the western slope are now galloping in that direction. (Brainerd Tribune, 26 July 1873, p. 1, c. 6)

Our city was also favored this week by a visit of several days from Thos. H. Canfield, President Lake Superior & Puget Sound Land Co.; J. N. Hutchinson, President First Div. St. Paul & Pacific Railroad; S. K. Cass and brother, sons of President Cass, of the Northern Pacific; Rev. Dr. Hawley, of Danbury, Vt; Geo. B. Wright; Col. G. W. Sweet; and Mr. J. D. Sailer, of Philadelphia, who is connected with the L. S. & P. S. Land Company. (Brainerd Tribune, 26 July 1873, p. 1, c. 7)

29 July
OUR young folks had another of those inimitable parties over at the Reception House, West Brainerd, on Tuesday evening last; the dance went merrily on all the evening, and whole-souled enjoyment was the order. Refreshments were served, and, while looking on an hour or two, we could not but conclude that these Brainerd folks could just get up a better party, on shorter notice, than any folks we ever saw. The Ahrens Brothers did the handsome thing by their gay and numerous guests, as they always do, and as they can do. They deserve a thousand thanks for their kindness and courtesy. (Brainerd Tribune, 02 August 1873, p. 1, c. 4)

01 August

No Receiver!
_____

Judge Dillon Decides that no
Receiver for the St. Paul & Pacific is to be
Appointed.
_____

He Compliments the Old Man-
agement in the Highest
Terms.
_____

Glyndon and Brainerd Love Each Other,
but still they Mourn.
_____


Special Dispatch to the Brainerd Tribune.
ST. PAUL, Aug. 1, 1873.


“Judge Dillon, at Davenport, has decided that no Receiver will be appointed for the St. Paul & Pacific Railroad. Following his decision denying the appointment of a Receiver, as petitioned by the stockholders, he took occasion to comment, in the highest terms of praise, on the management of that corporation by Mr. Becker, and upon the manner in which its affairs had been conducted generally, under the old management.”
Thus endeth the agony.
Unless the Amsterdam capitalists take back what they said, (provided a Receiver was denied them), the probability is, the Brainerd or Glyndon Branches will not be built for the next five years.
The land grant will be lost and cannot be renewed.
Private enterprise will be compelled to build the roads, if built.
We shall wait patiently to see if the Dutchmen will take back their threats—that they will let the road, as it now stands, rot, and the land grant go to der dible, before they will furnish another tam dollar to build the road under the present management.
We don’t believe they can take it back, and don’t believe the branches will be built this fall, although they POSSIBLY may be built. We don’t know as we care a cuss about the Brainerd Branch, as our well-being does not entirely depend upon its construction, although it would be a great convenience; but we do feel deeply terrible for our Glyndon friends—Glyndon will make a good farm. Brainerd is not first-class grain land, and consequently MUST become a large and prosperous city. Every place is good for something. (Brainerd Tribune, 02 August 1873, p. 1, c. 4)

WE were informed yesterday that a cable dispatch had been received from the Amsterdam bankers that all the money required to finish the St. Paul & Pacific Road before the 3d of December next will be ready.—Pioneer 27th. [Buncombe.] (Brainerd Tribune, 02 August 1873, p. 1, c. 7)

MORE ABOUT THE BRANCHES.


The Pioneer of the 1st closes an editorial on the Branch probabilities as follows:
“The public interest centers upon the probable effect upon the prospects of the completion of the St. Vincent and Brainerd Branches of the St. Paul & Pacific Road. Mr. Cass, the President of the Northern Pacific, gave assurance to the court upon authority of European bondholders, that if the St. Paul & Pacific did not go into the hands of a receiver, the money to finish the St. Vincent Branch the coming fall, would be furnished. In regard to the Brainerd Branch we have no definite information, It is but justice to the applicants for a receiver to say that similar assurances were given on their part. As the land grant will again lapse, if the road shall not be completed this year, we cherish the hope that nothing will prevent the accomplishment of the work within the time specified in the Congressional act. (Brainerd Tribune, 09 August 1873, p. 1, c. 6)

02 August

RETURN OF GENERAL ROSSER.


General Rosser and three of his children, Sarah, John and Thomas, Jr., ca. 1872.
Source: Minnesota Historical Society
General Rosser, Chief Engineer of the surveying expedition which has been engaged in locating the line of the Northern Pacific Railroad from the Missouri River to the Yellowstone River, passed east on Saturday’s train. The General completed his portion of the expedition’s object, and has now returned to put his survey and profiles into shape for the government of future operations of the continental road, in adding another, and most important link to its great chain. We had not the pleasure of an interview with Gen. Rosser as he passed through, but we learned the following facts from a prominent gentleman who came from Bismarck in company with him: Gen. Rosser is perfectly delighted with the result of his official duties, and has found a route across the plains, between these two great valleys, that he, nor no one else, knew existed—a distance of some two hundred miles. The country between Bismarck and the Yellowstone Valley has heretofore been generally considered, for the most part, a barren waste, made up largely of the noted and much talked of Bad Lands. But the third and last line run through, we are delighted to learn, traverses one of the most beautiful and fertile regions on the line, grandly adapted to agriculture, grazing, etc. Only one spur of the Bad Lands was encountered, and that only fifteen miles in width; and with this solitary exception, the country is everything that could be desired for settlement and cultivation. In this region, too, there is inexhaustible quantities of coal, iron ore, and other minerals, and the western terminus of this new division brings the Northern Pacific into the great national park region, and reaches into the rich mining region of the Montana country. Next year, without a doubt, the Northern Pacific Company, with its characteristic energy, will push its iron rails on to the Yellowstone, and, with their powerful engines, wake up the dead mound builders and living heathens of that remote garden of our continent.
This is good news for all concerned in the prosperity and advancement of the great Northern Pacific, and is especially encouraging to our Bismarck friends, as it makes that point the permanent crossing of the Missouri by the Road. For some years to come, instead of trying to bridge the Missouri, the Company will probably put on mammoth transfer steamers, which will answer all practical purposes, and save detention in the final completion of the line from lake to ocean. (Brainerd Tribune, 09 August 1873, p. 1, c. 3)

SEE: 14 December 1871

SEE: 29 February 1872
SEE: 20 July 1872
SEE: 25 October 1872
SEE: 26 October 1872
SEE: 14 February 1873
SEE: 01 March 1873
SEE: 18 March 1873
SEE: 23 August 1873
SEE: 25 October 1873
SEE: 15 April 1876
SEE: 22 July 1876
SEE: 28 October 1876

SEE: 06 January 1877
SEE: 17 March 1877
SEE: 25 April 1877
SEE: 30 April 1877
SEE: 05 May 1877
SEE: 12 May 1877
SEE: 17 May 1877
SEE: 26 May 1877
SEE: 06 June 1877
SEE: 21 July 1877
SEE: 11 August 1877
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SEE: 15 September 1877
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SEE: 08 November 1877
SEE: 22 December 1877
SEE: 26 February 1878
SEE: 15 June 1878
SEE: 06 July 1878
SEE: 17 August 1878
SEE: 24 August 1878
SEE: 23 January 1879
SEE: 25 January 1879
SEE: 11 March 1879
SEE: 15 March 1879
SEE: 05 April 1879
SEE: 12 April 1879
SEE: 24 May 1879
SEE: 06 December 1879
SEE: 13 December 1879
SEE: 27 December 1879

05 August

PROSPECTS OF THE ST. PAUL &
PACIFIC EXTENSIONS.


The St. Paul Press of the 5th inst., says, editorially: “We inadvertently omitted to state, on Sunday morning, in attempting to give the main points of the St. Paul & Pacific Railroad controversy, and its result, that the determination of Judge Dillon to co-operate with any parties who would furnish the means to complete the road, and save the land grant, by appointing a receiver to expend the moneys so provided under the orders of the court, was cordially accepted by the officers of the St. Paul and Pacific Railroad and its various branches, including the representatives of the trustees of all the parties including the representatives of the trustees of all the parties in interest. Judge Dillon stated that such appointment was to be considered in no respect as a reflection on any of the officers, or on their past management. In fact, when during the course of the last conference between the litigants on Friday, a proposition was made that in case the decree to be issued by the Circuit Court, an order should be included to compel the present management to afford all reasonable facilities in its power to aid in finishing the extensions, under the order of the Court, the Judge refused the request, and said it would be time enough to issue such an order when such reasonable facilities were denied. Without some further evidence than he had yet had, to the effect that the present officers of the road were inimical to the success of the proposed extension, by whomsoever accomplished, he refused to make any order which would have the appearance of want of confidence in their good faith. The theory on which the court proposed to appoint a receiver to take charge of the unfinished portions of the road was, that the Holland bondholders, represented by the parties in the suit, were the principal parties in interest; that unless they furnished the means to finish the projected lines, a portion of their land grant would be lost, and an important portion of their security for money already advanced would be unavailable; and that as they had ostensibly expressed a want of confidence in the former management, the court would relieve them of this excuse by undertaking to disburse the funds to be provided through an officer of its own. If under guarantee—which is the guarantee of the Circuit Court of the United States—the parties most directly interested will not advance sufficient funds to finish the lines covered by their mortgages and to earn and acquire the lands granted by Congress, on which their mortgage is based, it will be pretty evident, in the language of Judge Dillon, “that they do not want a railroad, and do not care for the sufficiency of their securities.”
As before intimated, we doubt the willingness of the Holland parties to furnish the five millions required to complete the uncompleted lines. Their offer to do this, made by Lippmann, Rosenthal & Co., was based on the condition that the U. S. Circuit Court should give to the men furnishing the necessary money a priority of lien on all the property, franchises and lands of all the different companies—but which are, in fact, all one company—which were covered by four mortgages. The court had no power to thus impair the obligation of contracts; and when this fact is made known to Lippmann, Rosenthal & Co., it may be reasonably anticipated that the game is up, so far as they are concerned. They, led by Willmar, wanted to come into full control of all the railroad property of the St. Paul & Pacific Railroad Company; if the court will not lend its aid to their scheme, it may well be doubted whether they will be ready to advance more money. But in case satisfactory assurances to this effect are not forthcoming in a few days, other parties, it is intimated, stand ready to make favorable propositions for the completion of the branch line from Watab to Brainerd, and probably from St. Cloud to Alexandria—propositions which will meet the views of the court to this extent. So that, whatever may be the result of the negotiations now in progress through the cable with the Holland bondholders, the important connections with Brainerd and with Alexandria, are likely to be completed within the time stipulated by Congress, and these most necessary auxiliaries to the railroad system of St. Paul secured beyond a peradventure. (Brainerd Tribune, 09 August 1873, p. 1, c. 4)

09 August
EX-VICE PRESIDENT Schuyler Colfax will pass through here early next week, on a visit over the Northern Pacific, to Bismarck and return. (Brainerd Tribune, 09 August 1873, p. 1, c. 5)

AS IT OUGHT TO BE.—There is what seems to be an authentic rumor that the Land Department office of the Northern Pacific is to be removed, in a week or two, from St. Paul to Brainerd. We believe this rumor fully, for the reason that Brainerd is the only suitable location for that Department under the shining sun; and why it has not been located here two years ago, passes all our understanding. It seems to us that the Company have been very slow in seeing that this Department, above all others, should be on the line of their road, right among the people who have to do with it. It might as well open its office in the Bahama Islands as in St. Paul, for on the line of the road is where the office, for the transaction of all office business, ought to be, by all means; if they desire to have an Agent in St. Paul, or in any other distant city in Christendom, why, that is eminently proper; but here is where the office ought to be, if they wish to subserve the best interests of the thousands of people who are buying their lands. (Brainerd Tribune, 09 August 1873, p. 1, c. 6)

Progress of the Northern Pacific.


In little more than twenty-four months of working time, the Northern Pacific Railroad Company has accomplished the following results:
1. It has built and opened to business more than 500 miles of its line of Road, besides an additional section of one hundred miles put under contract and now being constructed.
2. It has completed the entire Eastern Division of its Road, uniting the commerce of the Lakes with the navigation of the Upper Missouri, and has formed favorable connections with lines of steamers eastward from Duluth to Buffalo, Erie and Cleveland, and westward from Bismarck (where the road strikes the Missouri), to Fort Benton in Western Montana, thus opening a new and direct east and west route of travel and transportation 2,500 miles in length by lake, rail and river, between the Atlantic States and the New Northwest.
3. It has secured—by reason of the shortness and directness of its line—the trade of the Northwest, including the transportation of Army and Indian supplies.
4. It has earned title to nearly ten million acres of lands granted by the Government to aid in the construction of the road, and these consist mainly of good prairie, farm and grazing lands in Central Minnesota and Dakota, and valuable timber lands about Puget Sound.
5. It has fully organized its Land and Emigration Department, and successfully begun the work of selling and settling its land grant. It has realized from lands thus far sold an average price of nearly six dollars per acre, and from the proceeds has already begun the purchase and cancellation of its 7-35 first mortgage bonds.
6. It has opened to the landless citizens of this and other countries, and to the markets of the world, 200,000 square miles of the grain belt of the continent, from which the bulk of the wheat export of the United States must, ere long, be drawn.
The work of construction is progressing satisfactorily, mainly in Washington Territory, where the connection is being completed between Puget Sound and the Columbia River. The Company’s engineers, escorted by U. S. troops, are now making a final location of the line of the road from the crossing of the Missouri to the crossing of the Yellowstone, and up the valley of the latter to the mountains—this being the only portion of the route not yet determined. (Brainerd Tribune, 09 August 1873, p. 4, c. 1)

11 August
EX-VICE PRESIDENT COLFAX passed west on Monday. He was accompanied by Senator Windom and other distinguished gentlemen. (Brainerd Tribune, 16 August 1873, p. 1, c. 7)

12 August
THE EXTENSIONS.—Advices received from New York yesterday, announce that the cable telegrams from Europe in regard to the St. Paul & Pacific extensions are of an encouraging character, and that full particulars have been forwarded here by mail. Definite information in regard to the work on the St. Vincent and Brainerd extensions will not be received here before tomorrow, and in the meantime the contractors stand ready with a large force of workmen to resume operations on the lines immediately after the reception of the word authorizing them to go ahead.—[Press, Aug. 12 (Brainerd Tribune, 16 August 1873, p. 1, c. 4)

16 August
THERE are no further ”probables” in regard to the Northern Pacific Company extending its road thirty miles beyond the Missouri this season; it will positively be done, and preparations are now being made to commence work at once. The chief object is to reach the vast coal mines lying just west of the Missouri River, this fall, and then, during the coming winter, we can all “warm up the subject,” or any other man. (Brainerd Tribune, 16 August 1873, p. 1, c. 3)

23 August
GEN. ROSSER has made his official report on the survey of the route from the Missouri to the Yellowstone—205 miles—to the board of directors of the Northern Pacific Railroad, and the report has been unanimously accepted. The company have already authorized the reception of bids for its construction. This division of the Northern Pacific will be built next season, and this winter, we doubt not, the timber and ties for its construction will be gotten out in the vicinity of Brainerd. (Brainerd Tribune, 23 August 1873, p. 1, c. 4)

SEE: 14 December 1871

SEE: 29 February 1872
SEE: 20 July 1872
SEE: 25 October 1872
SEE: 26 October 1872
SEE: 14 February 1873
SEE: 01 March 1873
SEE: 18 March 1873
SEE: 02 August 1873
SEE: 25 October 1873
SEE: 15 April 1876
SEE: 22 July 1876
SEE: 28 October 1876

SEE: 06 January 1877
SEE: 17 March 1877
SEE: 25 April 1877
SEE: 30 April 1877
SEE: 05 May 1877
SEE: 12 May 1877
SEE: 17 May 1877
SEE: 26 May 1877
SEE: 06 June 1877
SEE: 21 July 1877
SEE: 11 August 1877
SEE: 29 August 1877
SEE: 15 September 1877
SEE: 25 October 1877
SEE: 08 November 1877
SEE: 22 December 1877
SEE: 26 February 1878
SEE: 15 June 1878
SEE: 06 July 1878
SEE: 17 August 1878
SEE: 24 August 1878
SEE: 23 January 1879
SEE: 25 January 1879
SEE: 11 March 1879
SEE: 15 March 1879
SEE: 05 April 1879
SEE: 12 April 1879
SEE: 24 May 1879
SEE: 06 December 1879
SEE: 13 December 1879
SEE: 27 December 1879

“OLD MIKE”—all the name we know for him—laid down on the track the other evening up near Bridges’ warehouse, and the nine o’clock train coming along, at only a moderate gait, struck Mike and knocked him off to one side—the engine happening to have a very low pilot—and he sustained no other injuries than several severe bruises and contusions; but it was one escape in a thousand. Mike was going to “bate hell” out of the whole train crew for hurting him so. (Brainerd Tribune, 23 August 1873, p. 1. c. 6)

BRAINERD.
_____

Her Condition and What She is Doing.
_____

No. 1.
_____


Most of our citizens know what our circumstances and conditions were one year ago; they can easily call to mind the crowded streets, the busy stores, the jammed hotels; and how the rumbling of the cars and sound of the hammer were heard all day, and not infrequently all night. Then, money was handled freely, and it was not hard work to save a dollar. Every thinking man knew that the kind of work that brought most of the money into circulation at that time was only temporary; that Lyman Bridges would not always have in his employ, with his headquarters at Brainerd, several hundred men, and that the Northern Pacific Company would not keep employed as many more men in building water tanks, laying foundations and putting in side-tracks. This work has been done, and we must look about us and not count upon anything that is not permanent and solid. I propose to mention a few of the more prominent institutions that our young city can already boast of, from week to week. With a desire to find out really what we had by way of a start “in the solids,” I took a stroll around town, and first struck the Brainerd Lumber and Manufacturing Company’s establishment, where I was struck with indications of business that surprised me. The main building is 30x50, two stories; the wing, 25x40, one story. There are three machine rooms; the first has the machinery for putting doors together, by the celebrated door clamps. This machinery takes up the entire room. In the south room there are five large machine tables—the surface or planing machine, the flooring and matching machine, the siding machine, the cut-off, and the saw table. There is but one room in the second story, and in this room there are also five machine tables—the sticker, for mouldings, the blind and slat machine, the sash clamps, the mortising machine, and the saw table. All the machinery is new, and the rapidity with which they turn out work is an evidence of the profitableness of the business. The business of this company is the manufacturing of doors, sash, mouldings, casings, store fronts, blinds, etc. In connection with the factory they keep a corps of carpenters employed in putting up all sorts of buildings. Their business extends all along the line of the N. P., and is and will continue to be a great source of wealth. Mr. J. S. Campbell is the business manager and Superintendent of the same. (Brainerd Tribune, 23 August 1873, p. 1, c. 7)

27 August
ANOTHER HAPPY AFFAIR.—We are pleased to record another of those events in our local history which are so well calculated to bring “men nearer to men,” and through which that better part of man is so beautifully and forcibly illustrated. Our friend, Mike Grace, Esq., as all who live hereabouts know, has long been one of the many main props of the Northern Pacific, in the capacity of Traveling Engineer. A short time since, the co-workers and friends of Mr. Grace took it into their heads to make him a present, as a proof of the high estimation in which he was held among them as a gentleman and artisan. Accordingly, the engineers on the Road and the machinists at the Shops, subscribed the snug sum of $135.00, with which a handsome watch and chain was purchased at the jewelry store of E. L. Strauss, Esq., Brainerd, and suitably inscribed. On Wednesday evening, the subscribers and friends of Mr. Grace to the number of a hundred or more, congregated at Martin Shades Billiard Hall, where a bounteous supper had been prepared, when Mr. G. was waited upon by a committee and requested to “fall in.” He did so, and was ushered into the banquet chamber, where all awaited his presence. Mr. C. Bloom, the popular Clerk at the Headquarters Hotel, then stepped forward and presented the gift to Mr. Grace, accompanying the present with the following remarks:
FRIEND GRACE.—I have the pleasant duty assigned me by your many friends of the Northern Pacific Railroad, and on their behalf, of presenting to you this beautiful watch and chain, which we trust you will accept as a slight token of their regard and esteem. This, Sir, is not presented for its intrinsic worth, nor do we expect you to value it on that account, but rather as a voluntary tribute of those with whom you have been long associated, and who have learned your high attributes as a man, your uniform courtesy toward those who have had the good fortune to be associated with you, and the competency always exhibited by you in the performance of the responsible duties which has devolved upon you to perform. For these and other reasons which we might assign, we tender you our appreciation in this manner; and in the future, wherever duty may call you, however widely our paths may be separated, rest assured you will be remembered with that regard which has manifested itself on this occasion. In conclusion, we would say (one and all), may health and prosperity attend you, and may you, as we know you will, wear this little souvenir with honor to yourself and friends.
The whole affair was a complete surprise to the recipient of the beautiful gift, so well had the plan been laid and executed, and he was only able to give utterance to his heartfelt thanks. It is needless to add that a grand time followed, at supper and during the evening, in honor of one of the most popular men in the operating departments of the Northern Pacific, and who, we regret to learn, has left us for another field of labor. (Brainerd Tribune, 30 August 1873, p. 1, c. 6)

30 August
Geo. W. Cushing, Esq., recently the Superintendent of Motive Power on the N. P. R. R., has resigned his position, to accept a similar position on the Toledo, Wabash & Western R. R. (Brainerd Tribune, 30 August 1873, p. 1, c. 3)

GOOD FOR BISMARCK, AND EVERYBODY.—Material is now being shoved westward for the purpose of fencing the cuts along the Dakota Division, so that the road from Fargo to Bismarck will be kept open and operated during the coming winter. We believe Mr. E. H. Bly, of this city has the contract. (Brainerd Tribune, 30 August 1873, p. 1, c. 5)

BRAINERD.
_____

Her Condition and What She is Doing.
_____

No. 2.
_____

The Establishment of the N. P. Manu-
facturing Company.
_____


This company employs from 22 to 25 men, and have a capacity for, and do manufacture 20,000 feet of lumber, 20,000 shingles, and 10,000 laths per day.
They, of course, are doing a good business, while they have hardly made a commencement towards opening the large field that is before them. H. D. Pettibone, Esq., is the business man of the concern.
One cannot look into and examine the permanent improvements of our city without noticing the liberality and public spirit of the L. S. & P. S. Co. They have, during the past season, erected buildings, graded streets, and put down sidewalks, at a cost of over seven thousand dollars. They seem to realize the fact that, to make a wealthy city, we must induce men of capital to settle here. We understand they are holding out very liberal inducements to any parties wishing to engage in manufacturing of any kind. They have been very liberal to all religious and benevolent societies, and especially to any move that has for its object the advancement of education. Mr. L. P. White, their Agent, with his broad views and liberal public spirit, has won the confidence of our people, while he has sustained and held up the reputation of the company. (Brainerd Tribune, 30 August 1873, p. 1, c. 6)

The Lake Superior and Puget Sound Company, a subsidiary of the Northern Pacific Railroad, spends $7,000 on buildings, streets, and sidewalks, in order to induce men of capital to find favor here. (Brainerd’s Half Century, Ingolf Dillan, General Printing Company, Minneapolis, Minnesota: 1923, p. 15)

A “DUCK.”—As our friend, Mike Grace, Esq., traveling engineer of the N. P., was spending a day here recently, he had a little experience in the ante-chamber of a “watery grave.” Being down to the river for a walk, he stepped out on the boom logs, and from thence to some floating ties nearby. Those ties, however, like some marriage ties, proved treacherous, and friend Grace proceeded from thence to the bottom of the Old Father of Liquids—the Mississippi. After a short interview with the catfish below, he came to the surface and crawled to the shore, where, with as good a “grace” as possible, our friend Grace sat in deep contemplation on the downs and ups, and the ins and outs of life, till the warm rays of Old Sol dried the surface of things once more. It is intimated that “Mike” got off a few “quotations” from the old master, upon getting to shore, by way of an effort to do that dampness full justice. He was perfectly excusable, we think, for perpetrating a few stanzas, under the aggravating circumstance, for we know how it is ourself. (Brainerd Tribune, 30 August 1873, p. 1, c. 7)

09 September

THE FAREWELL PARTY—
A PRESENTATION.


Mr. R. B. Small, who for a long time past has been the Master Mechanic at the Northern Pacific Machine Shops here, but who recently resigned to go on to the Toledo, Wabash & Western Road, was made the subject of a grand surprise on Tuesday night last, by his little array of co-workers in the various branches of the mammoth machinery institution named. A day or two before, “the boys” who had spent pleasant days under the kind direction of Mr. Small, and who very sincerely regretted his departure, determined to show their hearty appreciation of him as a noble gentleman and artisan, by giving a grand party in his honor, and making him a present of a watch and chain, and diamond pin. Now, it is well known that the men—everyone of them—in the several departments of the Machine Shops, are among the most open-hearted, generous and appreciative men in even this western country of proverbial open-hearted liberality; and it is well-known that when they undertake to do a thing they do it right and in no half-way manner, proof of which has been abundantly illustrated within the past year. Well, the boys of the various departments put their heads together and purchased a most beautiful gold watch and chain at a cost of $400.00, and a diamond bosom pin at a cost of some $200.00; this part, of course, was all “done on the sly.” Then, they arranged for a grand party at Bly’s Hall, gotten up in first-class style, with printed programmes, etc., and paid a hundred or two dollars for a refreshment place to be kept open for the accommodation of the whole company, and hired the Brainerd Band—which, by the way, has grown to be a splendid affair—to furnish the music for the occasion. They then engaged a sumptuous supper—to be prepared at the Headquarters Hotel, to feed the whole multitude, the whole affair, from beginning to end to be free as water to the two or three hundred invited guests. Evening came, and with it the company gathered. We looked in upon the grand doings about ten o’clock, and are free to say that the company excelled any we ever saw in the city, in extent, gaiety, and “youth and beauty.” After two or three dances had been enjoyed, the house was called to order, when Mr. Jno. H. Whyte invited Mr. Small to mount the platform with him, when he presented the confused “Master” with first the watch and chain, and then the pin, accompanied by a few appropriate remarks, and the two following letters:

From the Employees of the Locomotive Department.
MR. R. B. SMALL.—Respected Sir: It is with mingled feelings of pleasure and regret we have learned that you are about to leave us. Regret at losing one whom we have all learned to respect and esteem as our worthy Master Mechanic, and pleasure in the knowledge that in the distant part of the country to which you are going, fresh honors await you. Your familiar face and genial presence will be missed from amongst us, and will long be remembered by us; and as a small token of the regard and esteem in which you are held, and with the hope that your future life may be crowned with success, we ask you to accept this watch and chain. You will often look at it, and as it denotes the moments, days, and months as they fly past, we trust it will also preserve in your mind a vivid remembrance of the Employees of the Northern Pacific Railroad.
May you live a long, happy and prosperous life, is the hope and sincere wish of all.

_____


From the Employees of the Car Department.
MR. R. B. SMALL.—Respected Sir: We have heard with deep regret, that you are about to sever your connection with us, and to remove to new spheres of labor in a distant part of the country. It would be ungrateful of us to allow the present occasion to pass without showing you some mark of respect. We have therefore selected a diamond pin, not so much for its intrinsic worth, but as a fit emblem of the pure regard in which you are held by us, we ask you to receive it as a token of sincere respect, and may you live long to wear it.
Our united and best wishes will follow you.

Mr. Small, in the matter of this part of the programme, was completely surprised, and acknowledged himself squarely outflanked. The grand and costly party given in his honor he thought quite enough as a mark of esteem, but to add to that these princely gifts was more than he was prepared to meet. With a few touching words that came straight from the heart, he had to ”give over,” and after three cheers for Mr. Small, the dance went on, and did not close till four o’clock in the morning, when the participants dispersed to their homes to the tune of “Home Sweet Home” by the band, the chorus being sung by two hundred voices. Thus ended one of the proudest successes of the many put on foot by the noble boys up at the Machine Shops, participated in by all the railroad men within reach and their excellent families. (Brainerd Tribune, 13 September 1873, p. 1, c. 4)

18 September
The Panic of 1873 begins with the collapse of the Jay Gould bank, which is sponsoring the building of the Northern Pacific Railroad.

19 September

“BUSTED.”


News reached here yesterday morning that Jay Cooke & Co. had failed, and their banking houses in Philadelphia, New York and Washington had been closed, and the news has since been confirmed. Besides this, news also comes of the failure of Fisk & Hatch, New York, and near a dozen other firms in Pittsburgh, Philadelphia and New York, of less note, and still more tumbling. The two first named houses announce, however, that they hope to be only temporarily closed, and will prepare statements as soon as possible, showing their condition to be better than present circumstances would seem to indicate. We are not able to judge where failures will end, nor what the general effect is to be; but it would seem that the pressure of the summer months, in the financial world, was about to finish up by plunging the country into a panic similar to that of 1857. We await further news with great solicitude. (Brainerd Tribune, 20 September 1873, p. 1, c. 3)

Anton Mahlum relates, “I was employed in the capacity of yard clerk in the lumber yard under the late J. C. Barber. One day in September 1873, he brought out to me a copy of a telegram announcing the failure of Jay Cooke. The significance did not impress me until a few days later, when I was discharged, along with two-thirds of the entire shop force. J. C. Barber headed the list of the discharged from the car department. Then came several years of the hardest times Brainerd has ever seen; the population dwindled to less than half of what it was in 1872.... (Brainerd’s Half Century, Ingolf Dillan, General Printing Company, Minneapolis, Minnesota: 1923, p. 20)

THE “CHICAGO TRIBUNE” AND
THE NORTHERN PACIFIC—
A FEW FACTS VERSUS A
SCORE OF UNMITIGA-
TED FALSEHOODS.


The Chicago Tribune of the 19th has an editorial commenting upon the failure of Jay Cooke in the outstart, and which soon switches off on the past, present and future condition of the Northern Pacific Railroad, with elaborate comments on the character of the country and the climate of that part of the United States tributary to this road. We are unable to find words, in any language, of sufficient strength to convey our opinion of a newspaper that has become so debased and so lost to common decency as to go on and make comments and statement of so desperate a character, right in the face of a thousand facts to the contrary that must be perfectly familiar to the conductors of that journal. We can account for its madness and meaness in only two ways: its paid interest in some other western road and consequent jealousy of the grand country being opened up to settlement by the construction of the Northern Pacific, and because of the fact that it is being peopled by the best of citizens as fast as possible; and because, having proved recreant to its trust as a Republican newspaper, it was very justly read out of the party a year ago, and having ever since been soured with the acid of remorse, it loses no opportunity to malign the acts of Congress and the party—as in this instance concerning the act of Congress in conferring the Northern Pacific Land Grant; but in doing so it forgets consistency altogether. For, after repeating the “gross outrage perpetrated by Congress upon the people and country in donating 47,000,000 acres of the VALUABLE PUBLIC DOMAIN to the Northern Pacific enterprise,” it goes on to say that “if the road should ever be completed, by hook or by crook, all those furnishing the $36,000,000 required will receive in return, is 47,000,000 acres of BARREN, UNSALABLE land, as the road will never pay expenses even when completed” from lake to ocean.
It says “the completed portion now consists of 600 miles of poorly constructed road.” This is the first lie, and a mean lie it is too, for the fact is, no stretch of 600 miles of railroad west of Chicago is better or more substantially built, with easier grades and better curves; further, it is 25 per cent, the smoothest, solidest track we ever traveled over, west of Chicago, with the best and most comfortable rolling stock, and such a thing as accidents, of any character, is comparatively unknown. So much for that particular falsehood.
“Hundreds of poor, starving people, deceived into coming into this country, from Europe and elsewhere, by Northern Pacific Agents.” This is lie No. 2, and is scarcely worthy of notice, from its sheer ridiculousness. Although two years has scarcely passed since the country between here and the Red River has been opened to settlement, there are now thousands of people snugly ensconced in comfortable homes, not one in a hundred of whom could be induced to sell for less than a good round price, and why? Because, without exception, they are all self-sustaining, even so soon, while those who have been there a second season have this year a fine surplus of grain and other products to sell; and this year, from here to Red River, there will be shipped at least a million bushels of surplus grain to Duluth, where (and right here let the lying Tribune stick a peg) they will realize as much per bushel as they could in Chicago and this fact, coupled with the unequaled fertility and productiveness of the country in question, will densely people the Northern Pacific country over all other sections of the West, south of us, in spite of the combined efforts of all the journals of Illinois and Iowa to the contrary. The Northern Pacific, too, has heretofore, and we doubt not will continue for all time to come, to carry the products of the country tributary to it at a close margin, in order to give the producer the greatest advantages possible to realize largely on what he raises—an advantage not offered the “starving” farmers of Iowa and Illinois, by any means.
“The road is months in arrears, in the payment of its employees, and the workmen only remain because they are too penniless to get away.” To this stupid lie, No. 3, we need only say, that the Company pays its employees, of every class, from one end of the road to the other, each month, every dollar due them. Hence, if they remain with the Company, it must be as a matter of choice, and not otherwise. Further, in everyone of the operating departments of the line, there are none but first-class men employed, and men who would be sought after wherever they went.
“The interest on their bonds cannot be paid in future, save by the sale of new bonds.” This statement needs confirmation in a sad degree, and after the Company proves unable to pay said interest when due and demanded, would be the most seemly time for such an assertion. The interest will, no doubt, be fully provided for in ample time to meet all demands.
“The road will not pay when completed.” The Company will, no doubt, be very thankful to the Tribune for this highly important prophesy, at so opportune a moment. Among men who know the general character of the country skirting this gigantic enterprise, and the available resources, it is believed that from the time the first train reaches Puget Sound, the local business alone will pay running expenses, and in two years thereafter the dividends will be highly satisfactory to all concerned. And further, that it will be the only and BEST paying trans-continental railway for several decades to come.
The Tribune goes on with a long article composed of assertions and appellations of which the foregoing are only specimen bricks, such as, “A bubble that can never be repeated in history;” “Woeful condition of the Northern Pacific, owing to the failure of Jay Cooke & Co.,” when the fact is, that the failure of that firm will not even stagger the Northern Pacific, nor materially impede its progress, completion, and final proud success. “As desolate a waste and bleak a climate as is under the canopy of heaven,” says the Tribune. To which we only answer, that during all last winter, when a dozen roads in Iowa, Wisconsin, Illinois and Southern Minnesota were blockaded and dead for days and weeks at a time, the trains on the Northern Pacific failed to run its whole length but about three days, all told; and even this insignificant loss was caused only by the “great storm” that alone laid all the roads below here up for from one to three weeks. It cost $30,000 more to keep a single little road open 35 miles long, in New Hampshire, last winter, than it did to clear the snow from the entire length of the Northern Pacific track. So far as the “desolate waste” goes, we will say that the country along the Northern Pacific, for fertility of soil, healthfulness, beauty, and natural advantages, can, and DOES COURT COMPARISON with any equal extent of country in any portion of the civilized or uncivilized world, and, so far as climate is concerned, it stands head and shoulders above any equal stretch, in anything near the same latitude, on this continent; and is far preferable, as a place of habitation, to almost any location we ever visited in all our travels east or west, north or south, when everything of any importance is considered.
NOTE.—We published these answers to some of the grossly false statements of the Tribune, simply as an act of justice, and on the principle of “give the devil his due,” and do so, too, as an individual citizen on the line of the Northern Pacific, with a desire that this great enterprise, (the success of which will be a pride to the nation) and the fine country it is developing, may be protected from the designing slanders of newspapers and men who have interests elsewhere that they fear may suffer if the Northern Pacific country gets its fair and merited proportion of immigration, and the enterprise meets with the success it is fairly entitled to.—ED. (Brainerd Tribune, 27 September 1873, p. 1, c.’s 3 & 4)

THE BRAINERD BRANCH.—Some newspaper down at St. Paul said a few days ago that somebody had telegraphed from New York to somebody in St. Paul, that somebody had said that he suspicioned that from what he had seen in New York, that somebody had a very big notion that if somebody would furnish the money he would bet somebody that he would build the Brainerd Branch Railroad, from Sauk Rapids to Brainerd, or bust. We don’t know how it is ourself, however, and can only say that there is a rumor afloat that the Branch is to be completed before Dec. 1st; if it is, we shall hasten to tell our readers that the thing is did; but at present WE DON’T KNOW anything about it.

LATER, BUT NO BETTER.
[Special Dispatch to the Brainerd Tribune.]

ST. PAUL, Sept. 19.—Mr. Delano returned last evening. Nothing definite as to when work will commence, as there are several points to be settled yet. The Brainerd Branch being under same mortgage as St. Vincent Branch, it is subject to a lien of fifteen million dollars or portion of bonds sold. They hope to effect amicable arrangements for pro rata apportionment of this, and go ahead—as I understand it. (Brainerd Tribune, 20 September 1873, p. 1, c. 6)

20 September

Cranberries.


CRANBERRIES are lively now-a-days, and large quantities are being shipped by our dealers. There will probably be more of these berries shipped from Brainerd this year than there were blueberries. Of the latter, the shipments of the season footed up over 2,500 bushels. (Brainerd Tribune, 20 September 1873, p. 1, c. 6)

MAJ. HIBBARD, the indefatigable Superintendent of Immigration N. P. R R., also smiled upon us this morning. The Major is all life and business in his work. (Brainerd Tribune, 20 September 1873, p. 1, c. 7)

25 October

Northern Pacific Railway.


A Washington special to the Chicago Inter-Ocean says:
A bill has been prepared by Minnesota gentlemen for presentation early in the coming season, providing for the United States guaranteeing the interest of the bonds of the Northern Pacific Railway. It is claimed by them that they have secured the support of nearly the entire Minnesota and Wisconsin delegations in Congress. A draft of this bill was prepared before the failure of Jay Cooke & Co., and as long ago as July last. The parties engaged in the matter have spent the greater part of the summer in perfecting their plans for pushing it through Congress. (Brainerd Tribune, 25 October 1873, p, 1, c. 4)

GEN. THOS. L. ROSSER, Chief Engineer of the Northern Pacific Railroad, has tendered his resignation to the company, which is to take effect Nov. 1. Gen. Rosser has made an excellent and efficient officer. (Brainerd Tribune, 25 October 1873, p. 1, c. 5)

SEE: 14 December 1871

SEE: 29 February 1872
SEE: 20 July 1872
SEE: 25 October 1872
SEE: 26 October 1872
SEE: 14 February 1873
SEE: 01 March 1873
SEE: 18 March 1873
SEE: 02 August 1873
SEE: 23 August 1873
SEE: 15 April 1876
SEE: 22 July 1876
SEE: 28 October 1876

SEE: 06 January 1877
SEE: 17 March 1877
SEE: 25 April 1877
SEE: 30 April 1877
SEE: 05 May 1877
SEE: 12 May 1877
SEE: 17 May 1877
SEE: 26 May 1877
SEE: 06 June 1877
SEE: 21 July 1877
SEE: 11 August 1877
SEE: 29 August 1877
SEE: 15 September 1877
SEE: 25 October 1877
SEE: 08 November 1877
SEE: 22 December 1877
SEE: 26 February 1878
SEE: 15 June 1878
SEE: 06 July 1878
SEE: 17 August 1878
SEE: 24 August 1878
SEE: 23 January 1879
SEE: 25 January 1879
SEE: 11 March 1879
SEE: 15 March 1879
SEE: 05 April 1879
SEE: 12 April 1879
SEE: 24 May 1879
SEE: 06 December 1879
SEE: 13 December 1879
SEE: 27 December 1879

29 October
MERIT FINDS ITS REWARD.—It is with more pleasure than we can well express that we announce the promotion of our good friend, Major Geo. H. Smith, of the N. P. R. R. Major Smith has for this long time been Train Dispatcher for the road at these headquarters, and on Wednesday he received notice of his appointment as Superintendent of the L. S. & M. Division of the Northern Pacific, vice Hungerford resigned. This appointment will necessitate the removal of himself and his excellent family from this place, and right here is where the pain comes in to Major Smith’s hosts of friends here and along the line. No man ever lived in Brainerd who was more worthy, in every respect, of the high esteem and fast friendship of our entire community than Major Smith, both of which he has fully enjoyed; and the warm good wishes of everyone who knows him will go out after him in his new position. The Company has done themselves honor in thus rewarding a faithful servant and accomplished gentleman. (Brainerd Tribune, 01 November 1873, p. 1, c. 5)

RESPONSIBILITIES EXTENDED.—Our friend, Superintendent John H. Sullivan, has had the Dakota Division of the N. P. also placed in his care, by order from General Manager Mead. This increases Supt. Sullivan’s responsibilities largely, we should suppose, and makes him the manager of some 600 miles of road. Mr. S., having hosts of friends along the line, however, and being a thorough business and railroad man, will, we hope, find his extended field a pleasant one in which to operate. The care of the road could not have been placed in better hands. (Brainerd Tribune, 01 November 1873, p. 1, c. 6)

PREPARING.—Workmen have been engaged, the past ten days, in finishing off a suite of office rooms in the second story of the handsome General Office building of the Northern Pacific at this place. These rooms are to be occupied by the Land Department officials, Dec. 1st, as we are informed, and hereafter this highly important and prominent branch of the N. P. enterprise will be located at this place. These offices, and the corps of gentlemanly officials having charge of that department, will give Brainerd an addition, in more sense than one, of which she may well feel proud, and our good citizens will warmly welcome all the attachés thereof. (Brainerd Tribune, 01 November 1873, p. 1, c. 7)

08 November
APPOINTED.—It is with pleasure that we record the promotion our good friend W. H. Shreffler, Esq., to the position of Train Dispatcher, Minnesota Division N. P. R. R. at these headquarters. Mr. Shreffler succeeds Major Smith in this position; he has been the Major’s assistant the past year, and this fact, coupled with his high accomplishments as a telegrapher and director of trains, especially fits him for the important and responsible place he now holds. We congratulate friend “Shreff,” and his promotion simply implies that “merit finds its reward.” (Brainerd Tribune, 08 November 1873, p. 1, c. 6)

22 November

N. P. R. R.
_____

NORTHERN PACIFIC R. R.

TIME TABLE.


WEST TRAIN— Leaves Duluth 10:20 A. M.
Ar. at Brainerd 7:30 P. M.
Leaves Brainerd 8:00 A. M.
Ar. at Moorhead 2:25 P. M.

_____


EAST TRAIN— Leaves Moorhead 8:05 A. M.
Ar. at Brainerd 5:30 P. M.
Leaves Brainerd 6:30 P. M.
Ar. Duluth 3:50 P. M.

_____


LAKE SUPERIOR AND MISSISSIPPI DIV.
TRAIN— Leaves Duluth 10:20 A. M.
Arrive St. Paul 6:10 P. M.
Leaves St. Paul 8:10 A. M.
Arrive Duluth 4:40 P. M.
(Brainerd Tribune, 22 November 1873, p. 1, c. 2)

01 December
THE LAND Department of the Northern Pacific, in charge of Mr. Power, the gentlemanly and efficient Commissioner, arrived at these headquarters from St. Paul, on Monday evening last, bag and baggage, and have taken full possession of their beautiful and commodious quarters in the General Office building, second floor. There are some six or eight attachés of this Department, some of whom, we understand, are men of families, and the whole will be a most valuable as well as a desirable accession to our fine community, socially and otherwise. On behalf of our good people, we welcome them cordially among us. (Brainerd Tribune, 06 December 1873, p. 1, c. 6)

SEE: 05 October 1871
SEE: 01 April 1873
SEE: 03 May 1873

SEE: 27 December 1873
SEE: 10 January 1874
SEE: 06 June 1874
SEE: 12 September 1874
SEE: 28 November 1874
SEE: 06 February 1875
SEE: 20 March 1875
SEE: 12 April 1875
SEE: 07 August 1875
SEE: 09 October 1875
SEE: 19 February 1876
SEE: 22 July 1876
SEE: 07 October 1876
SEE: 25 April 1877
SEE: 14 June 1877
SEE: 04 August 1877
SEE: 06 October 1877
SEE: 23 October 1877
SEE: 02 November 1877
SEE: 18 June 1878
SEE: 20 July 1878
SEE: 06 August 1878
SEE: 21 September 1878
SEE: 28 September 1878
SEE: 10 May 1879
SEE: 05 July 1879
SEE: 30 July 1879
SEE: 27 September 1879
SEE: 18 February 1880
SEE: 21 February 1880
SEE: 28 August 1880
SEE: 31 August 1880
SEE: 04 September 1880
SEE: 16 September 1880
SEE: 09 October 1880
SEE: 09 December 1880
SEE: 25 December 1880
SEE: 17 February 1881
SEE: 21 February 1881
SEE: 26 February 1881
SEE: 09 April 1881
SEE: 13 April 1881
SEE: 23 April 1881
SEE: 19 May 1881
SEE: 11 June 1881
SEE: 23 July 1881
SEE: 01 September 1881
SEE: 03 October 1881
SEE: 06 December 1881
SEE: 30 July 1882
SEE: 02 August 1882
SEE: 05 February 1917

06 December
GENERAL MANAGER C. W. Mead, spent a day or so at these headquarters, this week. Mr. Mead spends nearly all of his time at St. Paul; but Superintendent Sullivan is always at his post here, and all goes smoothly and safely under his careful and efficient management. No more faithful officer holds position on any road than friend Sullivan. (Brainerd Tribune, 06 December 1873, p. 1, c. 6)

WE have authority for saying, the rumor that the Northern Pacific and L. S. & M. Railroads were about “to split the blanket,” and hereafter be distinct in every respect again, is incorrect in every particular. The latter will, as usual, remain under the management of the former. (Brainerd Tribune, 06 December 1873, p. 1, c. 6)

THEO. GLENN, one of the popular conductors of the line, has been promoted, as we understand, to Train Dispatcher of the Minnesota Division N. P. R. R. Harry Brintnell takes Mr. Glenn’s place on a train running east from here, while Fred. Sweetman will take the train lately run west by Mr. Brintnell. All quiet at the front. (Brainerd Tribune, 06 December 1873, p. 1, c. 6)

WE are delighted to notice that our young friend, Wm. Dowell, who had his foot cut off early in the fall while braking on a train, is nearly well again, and is able to “navigate” about the house, do writing, etc. He is stopping at Gurrell’s Restaurant, Fifth St. He is a worthy young man, and we are glad to see him so nearly well again. (Brainerd Tribune, 06 December 1873, p. 1, c. 6)

SEE: 21 July 1873

FRIEND WORMAN, who has been one of the valuable attachés of Col. Newport’s office for so long, is about to change his location to Fargo, where he will take charge of a responsible position for the N. P. Railroad. Mr. Worman has won many warm friends in Brainerd, and he will always be a welcome visitor. Success go with him. (Brainerd Tribune, 06 December 1873, p. 1, c. 7)

13 December
ABOUT twenty-five Finlander immigrants arrived at the Reception House over in West Brainerd, direct from their native land, about a week ago. They will remain at the Reception House this winter, working at whatever comes in their way, and in early spring will locate on homesteads hereabouts. They are a healthy, hardy people, and will make valuable citizens. Some of the children are enjoying a slight touch of scurvy, contracted while in transit. (Brainerd Tribune, 13 December 1873, p. 1, c. 6)

20 December
ENLARGED DUTIES.—We are pleased to learn that our friend, J. C. Congdon, Esq., who has for so long been the accomplished painter for the Minnesota Division N. P. R. R., has recently had the L. S. & M. Division placed under his care, in the artistic department. Mr. C. is not only an artist, but also a most worthy gentleman and estimable citizen, and we are pleased to note his merited success. (Brainerd Tribune, 20 December 1873, p. 1, c. 7)

27 December
CANED.—Mr. J. B. Power the Land Commissioner of the Northern Pacific at this place, received a package from Chicago on Tuesday last. Upon opening it he found an elaborately carved and gold-headed cane. It was a beautiful present, and was sent him by the “Dakota Land Improvement Association,” which is a colony of people intending to locate, next summer, on the N. P., at the crossing of the Cheyenne. This is a kind remembrance for courtesies extended, and most worthily bestowed. (Brainerd Tribune, 27 December 1873, p. 1, c. 6)

SEE: 05 October 1871
SEE: 01 April 1873
SEE: 03 May 1873

SEE: 01 December 1873
SEE: 10 January 1874
SEE: 06 June 1874
SEE: 12 September 1874
SEE: 28 November 1874
SEE: 06 February 1875
SEE: 20 March 1875
SEE: 12 April 1875
SEE: 07 August 1875
SEE: 09 October 1875
SEE: 19 February 1876
SEE: 22 July 1876
SEE: 07 October 1876
SEE: 25 April 1877
SEE: 14 June 1877
SEE: 04 August 1877
SEE: 06 October 1877
SEE: 23 October 1877
SEE: 02 November 1877
SEE: 18 June 1878
SEE: 20 July 1878
SEE: 06 August 1878
SEE: 21 September 1878
SEE: 28 September 1878
SEE: 10 May 1879
SEE: 05 July 1879
SEE: 30 July 1879
SEE: 27 September 1879
SEE: 18 February 1880
SEE: 21 February 1880
SEE: 28 August 1880
SEE: 31 August 1880
SEE: 04 September 1880
SEE: 16 September 1880
SEE: 09 October 1880
SEE: 09 December 1880
SEE: 25 December 1880
SEE: 17 February 1881
SEE: 21 February 1881
SEE: 26 February 1881
SEE: 09 April 1881
SEE: 13 April 1881
SEE: 23 April 1881
SEE: 19 May 1881
SEE: 11 June 1881
SEE: 23 July 1881
SEE: 01 September 1881
SEE: 03 October 1881
SEE: 06 December 1881
SEE: 30 July 1882
SEE: 02 August 1882
SEE: 05 February 1917

1874
10 January

Specimens, displayed in the first NP Depot in Brainerd, consisting of potted plants, a rack of antlers, sheaves of grain and framed pictures, ca. 1874.
Source: Frank Jay Haynes Collection, NDSU
A SIGHT.—The “sample room” connected with the Land Department of the Northern Pacific, at these headquarters, is a perfect museum of wonderful productions. Mr. J. B. Power, the Commissioner, has exhibited the most praise worthy and well directed energy in collecting and arranging before the eyes of the skeptical, samples of the actual productions of the RICH country traversed by the Northern Pacific, in the form of the most wonderful specimens of fruits, vegetables, and all the small grains. Those eastern bigots, who have taken so much diabolical delight in cursing the Northern Pacific Railroad, and the country through which it runs, had better take a peep at this sample room and its contents, and come out and experience a little of the superbly magnificent weather of this winter, and then crawl around into some dark alley and cowhide the dirty clothes off their miserably lying carcasses. (Brainerd Tribune, 10 January 1874, p. 1, c. 6)

SEE: 27 August 1880
SEE: 28 August 1880
SEE: 31 August 1880
SEE: 01 October 1880
SEE: 02 October 1880
SEE: 28 August 1885
SEE: 07 July 1898
SEE: 20 September 1911


POWER:

SEE: 05 October 1871
SEE: 01 April 1873
SEE: 03 May 1873

SEE: 01 December 1873
SEE: 27 December 1873
SEE: 06 June 1874
SEE: 12 September 1874
SEE: 28 November 1874
SEE: 06 February 1875
SEE: 20 March 1875
SEE: 12 April 1875
SEE: 07 August 1875
SEE: 09 October 1875
SEE: 19 February 1876
SEE: 22 July 1876
SEE: 07 October 1876
SEE: 25 April 1877
SEE: 14 June 1877
SEE: 04 August 1877
SEE: 06 October 1877
SEE: 23 October 1877
SEE: 02 November 1877
SEE: 18 June 1878
SEE: 20 July 1878
SEE: 06 August 1878
SEE: 21 September 1878
SEE: 28 September 1878
SEE: 10 May 1879
SEE: 05 July 1879
SEE: 30 July 1879
SEE: 27 September 1879
SEE: 18 February 1880
SEE: 21 February 1880
SEE: 28 August 1880
SEE: 31 August 1880
SEE: 04 September 1880
SEE: 16 September 1880
SEE: 09 October 1880
SEE: 09 December 1880
SEE: 25 December 1880
SEE: 17 February 1881
SEE: 21 February 1881
SEE: 26 February 1881
SEE: 09 April 1881
SEE: 13 April 1881
SEE: 23 April 1881
SEE: 19 May 1881
SEE: 11 June 1881
SEE: 23 July 1881
SEE: 01 September 1881
SEE: 03 October 1881
SEE: 06 December 1881
SEE: 30 July 1882
SEE: 02 August 1882
SEE: 05 February 1917

17 January

THE WILSON CASE.


The case of young Wilson for the killing of Egan in this city a year ago was finally disposed of last night at the Special Term of the District Court, Judge McKelvy, now in session here. The prosecution on the part of the State was conducted by Attorney General Geo. P. Wilson and County Attorney Geo. W. Holland. The defense was managed by Col. Flint, of St. Paul, Capt. L. W. Collins, of St. Cloud, and J. W. Steel, D. O. Preston, and C. B. Sleeper, of Brainerd. The case was opened by Holland and closed by Wilson, on the part of the State. Defense opened by Steel and summed up by Flint. Yesterday the jury retired at about 3 o’clock p. m.; and at ten o’clock they returned a verdict of “NOT GUILTY!” The very late hour to which we have waited in order to get the verdict for this issue, prevents us making any further notice of this important case at the present time.
P. S.—The Court adjourned at 9 o’clock this morning. (Brainerd Tribune, 17 January 1874, p. 1, c. 6)

SEE: 12 February 1873

WE learn, from a reliable source, that trains on the Northern Pacific will again commence running through to Bismarck on the first of March. (Brainerd Tribune, 17 January 1874, p. 1, c. 7)

24 January
Mr. Thos. H. Canfield, of New York, and President of the Lake Superior & Puget Sound Company, has been here, and along the line, for the past week. He was accompanied by Col. Geo. W. Sweet, the Attorney for the Company, and their visit has been a strictly business one. Mr. Canfield straightening up matters and putting the affairs of the Company upon a well-trimmed business basis at all the towns along the line, and particularly at Brainerd. He and Col. Sweet, with Mr. Lyman P. White, the resident agent here, were engaged a day or two in “straightening” some things here that were suffering for they they are now likely to get. (Brainerd Tribune, 24 January 1874, p. 1, c. 6)

SENSIBLE PLEASURE.—The gentlemanly corps of General office employees and heads of departments of the N. P. R. R., at this place, have fitted up a beautiful club and reading room in the second story of their fine office building here. They have all the leading journals and magazines of the country, and also a full list of the popular games, and other pastimes, with which they can profitably and pleasantly pass away their leisure hours. They have purchased and set up a handsome billiard table, among the rest, and all in all they possess quite an enviable retreat; it almost makes one wish he were a railroad man. But then they, one and all, being “white headed boys,” it does us good to see that they have hit upon, and so successfully carried out a plan whereby they can enjoy themselves during the winter months. (Brainerd Tribune, 24 January 1874, p. 1, c. 7)

28 January

INDIANS.

The report that was flying around town, last Wednesday, like a half-sled on a drunk, to the effect that “Bismarck had been took” by the Sioux, and half the people sent to Kingdom come, at the muzzle of the tomahawk, was very soon found to be a most outrageous case of rumor. Nothing of the kind occurred, and is not likely to occur, right under the noses of enough soldiers to manage all the Indians in that section. The completion of the Northern Pacific Railroad, however, will be the cheapest and most effectual way those red devils of the plains can be finally subdued. If the Government will only promptly and liberally encourage the completion of this great thoroughfare—yea, even were it to build the road—millions of money would be saved to the public treasury in the end, and we would have a grand continental railroad in the bargain. We hope Congress may be far-seeing and liberal enough in its views to know the great result that must immediately be gained in solving this “Indian mystery” by completing the Northern Pacific, and have stamina enough to act in accordance with their honest belief. (Brainerd Tribune, 31 January 1874, p. 1, c. 5)

06 February

THE L. S. & M. RAILROAD TO GO
BACK TO ORIGINAL OWNERS.


From the St. Paul Press of the 15th, we learn that at a meeting of the directors of the L. S. & M. road, and the Northern Pacific company, held in New York on Friday, the 6th instant, Gen. Cass and other officers of the Northern Pacific being present, satisfactory agreement was entered into by the parties interested, by which the lease of the Lake Superior line will be surrendered back into the hands of the former directors. It is true, that the legal documents preceding and authorizing such important transfers had not been signed on the day mentioned—there being still some unimportant details to be completed—but these were subsequently attended to, and the assurance is now given that the papers were passed on either Tuesday or Wednesday last, and the title to the valuable property is again vested in the hands of the Directors of the old Lake Superior & Mississippi Company.
As there are some sweeping and important changes contemplated, it will necessarily take time to perfect them, and it is averred that the line will not formally pass under the active control and management of the old Directors until on or about the first day of March, although the time of transfer is stated in some quarters as early as the 25th of February. There are, however, substantial reasons for the belief that the change cannot be smoothly and satisfactorily made by the date last designated.

THE BRAINERD BRANCH.


After having kept quiet for some months in remarking anything about the probabilities of the “early completion” of the Brainerd Branch—in fact, that we have given our readers an absolute “rest” on the subject—we trust they will permit us now to remark, that in consideration of the loss to the Northern Pacific of its L. S. & M. Division, it is our candid opinion (No. 1,550) that the show is somewhat flattering, now, for the early completion of the Brainerd and Sauk Rapids Extension, commonly called the “Brainerd Branch.” Bets are offered by several in town that a train will run through from Brainerd to St. Paul, via the Watab gold mines, touching at the soap mines, of course, by July 1st next. And now, hurrah for the Branch again. (Brainerd Tribune, 21 February 1874, p. 1, c. 5)

14 February
H. C. ROOT, Esq., who has, with his estimable family, been a resident of Brainerd, in the telegraph department of the road, for a long time, has taken his departure for another field of labor. Root was a good boy, bless him, and could get as much lightning, per foot, out of telegraph wire as any man on the job. Lots of folks will regret the loss of Root, for he was always crammed full of fun—jolly and liberal. Success attend him. (Brainerd Tribune, 14 February 1874, p. 4, c. 1)

21 February
GENERAL HAZEN, writing from Fort Buford (at the mouth of the Yellowstone) to the New York TRIBUNE, gives the Northern Pacific country, from the Red River Valley west to the Pacific Ocean, a fearful dose. He says, outside the few little valleys along the route, the country is worth about one cent per acre, and that the “Iceothermals” are a humbug. He concedes the point, however, that the country on the Northern Pacific Railroad east of and including the whole Red River scope, is all that is claimed for it. The General is very evidently in a bad humor—probably the supply of wine, etc., has given out at that remote military post, and the General, in order to relieve himself, has to pitch into something, and the Northern Pacific being the chosen victim, he goes for it heavy. (Brainerd Tribune, 21 February 1874, p. 4, c. 1)

22 February
THE SNOW storm of last Sunday, in the State, blocked up all the roads in Minnesota, EXCEPTING the Northern Pacific. Our trains were detained some, a few days ago, but it was not the storm, as we understand it, but a small body of the old icy snow that got into some of the cuts. Many trains on roads below here were literally lost for several days. Tally one peg for the Northern Pacific. (Brainerd Tribune, 28 February 1874, p. 1, c. 6)

25 February
MORE RAILROAD RUMORS.—Among the latest of the various railroads rumors which have been set adrift in this city is one that General Manager Mead, of the Northern Pacific, has tendered his resignation. As Mr. Mead is still absent at Omaha, it cannot be ascertained whether or not, there is any substantial reason for the statement, but it is averred that his letter of resignation was received and considered in Philadelphia on Friday last.
It is conceded that there are the best of reasons for the reported surrender of the Lake Superior & Mississippi road into the hands of the old directors, the agreement to that effect having been agreed upon, provided payment was made of a certain stipulated sum said to be due the Northern Pacific company.
In the event of the change herein indicated, it is further rumored that Frank H. Clark, Esq., will be called to the Presidency of the Lake Superior & Mississippi railroad, and that there will be a considerable shuttle movement among the minor officials of the road, which involves the recall of a number heretofore prominently connected with it.
As yet, the reports above made public are simply current on the streets, and have not been traced back to any official authority.—[St. Paul Press, 25th. (Brainerd Tribune, 28 February 1874, p. 1, c. 1)

06 March
THE DUTCH.—We understand that a dispatch was received yesterday from the Dutch bondholders of the St. Paul & Pacific, to the effect that they would not advance money for the completion of the branches, with the lien imposed by what is known as the De Graff Bill, which has become a law, upon the same, but would seek relief in the courts. This dispatch is regarded as a game of bluff to influence legislation.—St. Paul Pioneer. (Brainerd Tribune, 07 March 1874, p. 1, c. 3)

07 March
THE N. P. Machine Shops here are, we understand, to receive a large reinforcement of mechanics about the 1st of April, in all departments, and thereafter these immense shops will assume their wonted air of business—all of which will tend to make it more binding. (Brainerd Tribune, 07 March 1874, p. 1, c. 6)

14 March
POOR NORTHERN PACIFIC!--The recent blockading snow storm, which caused a general suspension of railroad trains in central and southern Minnesota, Wisconsin and Iowa, was not felt on the Northern Pacific Railroad at all, and trains made their daily trips, on time, from Fargo to Duluth. Oh, yes; we live in an “uninhabitable,” “snow-bound country.” Trains making regular trips everyday the year round without accident or delay; wood choppers, along the Northern Pacific have worked everyday throughout this winter in their shirt-sleeves; just cool enough to be delightful and extremely healthful, and keep the sleighing good all the time. If such winters as we have on the Northern Pacific are misery in themselves, we desire to experience a heap of such grief all the rest of our days. (Brainerd Tribune, 14 March 1874, p. 1, c. 4)

THE L. S. & M. Division of the N. P. R. R. is probably not going back to the original owners; and C. W. Mead, General Manager of the Northern Pacific, is probably not going to resign. How about the St. Paul Press making these “far-seeing statements, and staking its reputation on their truth?” etc. As a prognosticator, had not the Press better take a back set for a while, and let some “country daub” take a guess or two at it? Its time run out the first of this month. (Brainerd Tribune, 14 March 1874, p. 1, c. 6)

SUPERINTENDENT JOHN H. SULLIVAN, N. P. R. R., who has been absent some time at Hannibal, Mo., and elsewhere, is again at his headquarters here, just ripe for the labors of the coming season, and pleasant as ever in his intercourse with all. He informs us that trains will leave Fargo on Monday next in the direction of Bismarck, and that the Dakota Division will be opened up as quickly thereafter as a large force of men and well-directed labor can accomplish it. (Brainerd Tribune, 14 March 1874, p. 1, c. 6)

21 March
RETURNED.—Mr. Dewolf, the very popular landlord of the Headquarters Hotel, who has been on a protracted visit to the hills of New England, returned home a few days since, and was duly welcomed by his friends. We regret to learn that Mr. D. contemplates going back to his old home to reside permanently, ere long, having purchased a $90,000 hotel while he was away. We are sorry, indeed, to lose so valuable a citizen as Mr. Dewolf, and in going he will leave many good friends, whose heartiest good wishes will accompany him. We hope he may try and visit us on a pleasure excursion once a year, at least, in the future, and if he does so, we shall all do our best to “make it warm” for him. (Brainerd Tribune, 21 March 1874, p. 1, c. 4)

THE opening of the Dakota Division is progressing with a rush. We presume by the hour we go to press (Friday noon) the iron horse is frolicking around in Bismarck, and the Bismarckers are happy. Northern Pacific now open from Lake Superior to the Upper Missouri. (Brainerd Tribune, 21 March 1874, p. 1, c. 7)

26 March
THURSDAY evening, General Manager Mead, accompanied by a party of friends and officials, arrived from St. Paul. Mr. Mead has just returned from an important business tour to New York, and is now looking over the road with a view to setting things whirling for the season just opening. Having a due sense of sympathy in our heart, we spared him from a reporter’s interview yesterday, and thought that as he had made good his escape for a few days from the newspaper boxes of St. Paul, it would be absolutely outrageous to besiege him for news just as he imagined himself safe. We therefore go to press without any scrap-box of late railroad news, which we might have worked up, probably, had we made an impudent onslaught on Mr. Mead during his busy hours of business. (Brainerd Tribune, 28 March 1874, p. 1, c. 6)

28 March
THE L. S. & M. DIVISION.—The rumors in regard to the Lake Superior & Mississippi Railroad (now, by lease, one of the divisions of he Northern Pacific) going back to the original owners, and away from the control of the N. P. has assumed the form of a “vexed question;” a sort of “chronic rumor” manufactory. Almost everyday it has “gone back” from those three to six times, and as many times it has not gone back, by a jug full; but is to belong wholly and solely to the Northern Pacific, by lease, for ninety-nine years, with fine prospects, at the end of that time, of having the lease extended still further a thousand years, or until the millennium, or thereabouts. These rumors being in continual see-saw, we can give no definite information, “on our reputation as a news monger,” about it. We know of but two questions, however, in the United States which convulse the public mind up this way equal to the L. S. & M. matter—the Temperance Crusade, and “Will the Brainerd Branch be built this year?” (Brainerd Tribune, 28 March 1874)

30 March
THROUGH TO BISMARCK.—The pioneer train of the season, on the Dakota Division N. P. R. R., got through to Bismarck on Monday evening last at 7 o’clock. The iron horse was received amid great ado by the populace. Trains are now running regularly from Duluth to Bismarck, and ere long, we presume, a new summer time table will be out for the government of trains on all the divisions. General Manager Mead and Superintendent Sullivan got back to these headquarters from the “Dakota opening” on Wednesday morning. (Brainerd Tribune, 04 April 1874, p. 1, c. 5)

04 April
LONG and heavy trains are commencing to pass west on the road now, which brings back the old aspect of things. Large quantities of Manitoba bonded goods, as well as Government supplies, are commencing to come thick and fast. The Northern Pacific is certainly destined to do a vast amount of freighting this year, as well as passenger business. If it had three hundred miles more road built west, it would almost require a double track for the accommodation of the immense traffic over it, as then no other route could begin to compete with it in the transportation of the vast freights to Montana and the posts and settlements in the region of the Rocky Mountains. “Will the Northern Pacific pay?” “does it pay now?” Oh no, guess not! (Brainerd Tribune, 04 April 1874, p. 1, c. 4)

11 April
A NEW YORK COLONY.—We learn that a gentleman from New York State has been negotiating with the Land Department N. P. R. R. here this week for from twenty to forty sections of land on the line of the Northern Pacific for the accommodation of a colony of farmers from that State. Although we have got millions of acres of earth’s choicest lands between here and the Missouri, yet, five years hence, with the way immigration is to come in this season as a guide to guess from, this whole vast wealth of country will be densely peopled. Come on, ye longing thousands who want rich land, good climate and health, for we have it in profusion, just waiting for you. (Brainerd Tribune, 11 April 1874, p. 1, c. 3)

“GOING BACK.”


The L. S. & M. Railroad is supposed, now, among the very best professional guessers, to be going back very soon into the hands of the orig— that is, there is a rumor afloat to the effect that the thing has taken a positive turn now, and the matter about the Lake Superior and Mississippi Division of the Northern Pacific Railroad—the great trans-continental iron belt from Lake to Ocean—” “going back,” has assumed a tangible form, and that no doubt can now be reasonably entertained that it will very soon revert—that is, if it should “go back” many believe such a result would unquestionably cause the building of the “Brainerd Branch,” or else it wouldn’t, one or the other. (Brainerd Tribune, 11 April 1874, p. 1, c. 4)

15 April

THE BRAINERD BRANCH.


By the Bismarck Tribune of the 15th, we are delighted to learn that the “Brainerd Branch Railroad, from Brainerd to Sauk Rapids, is completed.” That is what it says among its headings over its St. Paul batch of special telegrams. At first thought we were going to deny the rumor; but we have not been over to the track for several days, and in denying it might be mistaken. Probably the thing might have been done in the night, without saying a word to us about it—we’ll go and see. Here, however, is the Tribune’s special telegram concerning the “Branch:”
St. PAUL, April 15.—The iron is purchased for the Brainerd Branch, and arrangements completed that will cause the completion of that road within ninety days. The Northern Pacific people have surrendered to the stockholders their lease of the Lake Superior and Mississippi Railroad, which has brought about this Brainerd Branch arrangement, which, when completed, will be operated by the Northern Pacific people. (Brainerd Tribune, 25 April 1874, p. 1, c. 2)

18 April
THE landlord of the Headquarters Hotel is now, Mr. E. W. Weed, Roadmaster N. P. R. R., who took possession this week. Mr. Dewolf left for his future eastern home on Wednesday morning, where ie has purchased a hotel property. If Mr. Weed knows as much about “keeping a hotel” as he does about keeping a railroad track in proper tone, the “Headquarters” will prove a most valuable public institution to the traveling public—and we feel sure he does, as he possesses all the essential elements to make a popular landlord. He also has an accomplished lady assistant in the person of Mrs. Weed, his wife. (Brainerd Tribune, 18 April 1874, p. 1, c. 7)

20 April
THE L. S. & M. Railroad has certainly gone back into the hands of the old stockholders; it did so on Tuesday—thank the Lord. (Brainerd Tribune, 25 April 1874, p. 1, c. 2)

02 May
NORTHERN PACIFIC FARMING.—From Mayor White, who has this week been to Moorhead and back, we learn that Mr. Engbretsen, at his place four miles north of Lake Park, has got his little patch of wheat about all in. The little patch consists of 1,500 acres in one field. Twenty-six double teams are at work dragging in the seed. This field will, with a fair season, yield at least 30,000 bushels of the golden grain, or $30,000 in filthy lucre.
Many other extensive farms are being opened up along the line. Among the number is one by Thomas H. Canfield, near the farm named above; Mr. Canfield will have two sections, or 1,280 acres broken up this season as a commencement. (Brainerd Tribune, 02 May 1874, p. 1, c. 3)

09 May
A SPECIAL dispatch from Washington to the St. Paul Press informs us that the House Committee on Public Lands have instructed Mr. Dunnell to report the Senate bill for the extending the time for the construction of the St. Paul & Pacific lines, and that the amendment to the bill referred to in our dispatches simply restores the provisions of the bill as originally introduced by Senator Ramsey, that all rights of actual settlers and their grantees, who have entered on and are residing in good faith on the railroad lands prior to the passage of this act shall be saved and secured. This provision was modified by the Senate committee so as to refer only to settlements made prior to September 3d 1872. It was restored by the Senate. If we may judge by the prompt action of the House committee there will be less opposition to the bill than was anticipated. (Brainerd Tribune, 09 May 1874, p. 1, c. 4)

THE NEED OF THE HOUR.


One of the most important needs of this hour is the completion of the St. Paul & Pacific road to the British line. In response to a deputation of anxious Manitobans that recently waited on Hon. Mr. Mackenzie, present Premier of the Dominion, inquiring when the Pembina & Winnipeg road would be built, he replied:
“The Government are prepared to go on with that road as soon as the St. Paul & Pacific people are ready to push theirs to the boundary line.”
Last week some Fort Garry people telegraphed to Consul Taylor, in the sates, inquiring about the St. Paul & Pacific extension bill, and he answered that it has not yet passed the Senate, and its chances were dubious, and added:
“It is doubtful whether the branch from Glyndon to Pembina will be completed until the Canadian line from Winnipeg to the frontier is fully graded and ready for the iron.”
From these opinions of the Premier and the Consul, it would appear that each party is believed to be waiting for the other, and is trying to stimulate the other. But, in fact, the bill has since passed the Senate by a vote of more than two to one, and its chance in the House, where it has been favorably reported, is believed to be good. Of course, the American end of this international line ought to be built first, so as to keep the through connections intact, and it is hoped that the bill will pass, and that the Legislature will restore the grant on such terms as will insure the speedy construction of the line. (Brainerd Tribune, 09 May 1874, p. 1, c. 4)

L. S. & M. OFFICERS.—The following is a list of the officers of the Lake Superior & Mississippi Railroad under the new order of things, as we get from a circular sent us:
J. P. Ilsley, President.
George H. Smith, Superintendent.
E. D. Ilsley, Auditor and General Ticket Agent.
T. M. Davis, Treasurer.
H. A. Towne, Sup’t. Machinery.
S. J. Wallace, Sup’t. Bridges and Buildings.
All of which compose a square ticket.
(Brainerd Tribune, 09 May 1874, p. 1, c. 5)

COL. JOHN H. STEVENS, of Minneapolis, an old citizen of Minnesota, and a man whom for many years we have felt honored to call a personal friend, spent a day in Brainerd this week. Col. Stevens has charge of the tree planting project on the Northern Pacific prairies, and is taking great interest in his work. He established, and for several years conducted the Farmers’ Union, our able Minnesota agriculture paper, at Minneapolis, and he is one of the most scholarly as well as practical agriculturists of Minnesota—and is styled the “Father of Minnesota Agriculture.” Some papers are talking of forcing Col. Stevens on the Congressional track this fall; we hope they will desist; and we trust he will not listen to such twaddle, for he is too good a man and useful a citizen in other ways, to be kicked about a whole Congressional District on a red-hot political griddle. (Brainerd Tribune, 09 May 1874, p. 1, c. 5)

Headquarters Hotel Ad, 20 June 1874.
Source: Brainerd Tribune
SEE the advertisement today for the Headquarters Hotel—E. W. Weed, proprietor. The “Headquarters” is par excellence this season, and travelers, tourists, invalids and pleasure-seekers will find it a home fully up to the necessities of this location. For hunting, fishing, health, happiness and pleasure, Brainerd can’t be beat on the continent, and the Headquarters Hotel can’t be beat for comfort and good cheer. (Brainerd Tribune, 09 May 1874, p. 1, c. 7)

The St. Paul & Pacific great extension bill, as it passed the Senate provides that, in case the said Railroad Company or its bondholders shall fail to produce by the 1st day of September, 1874, to the Governor of Minnesota its satisfactory evidence that sufficient means to complete said lines of railroad have been provided, the said Governor may contract with other parties for the completion of the railroad. (Brainerd Tribune, 09 May 1874, p. 1, c. 7)

11 May
A SPECIAL telegram to the Press from Washington, says Gen. Averill yesterday introduced the Northern Pacific subsidy bill. As we understand it, this bill is not correctly described as a subsidy bill. The bill provides that the Government shall guarantee the interest on the Company’s bonds—the Government being secured by a transfer of the land grant of the Company, with the power to sell the lands to indemnify itself in case the Company should default in the payment of interest.—Press, 12th. (Brainerd Tribune, 16 May 1874, p. 1, c. 5)

12 May

PROPOSITION FOR GOVERN-
MENT AID TO THE NORTH-
ERN PACIFIC.


WASHINGTON, May 12.—The long expected appeal of the Northern Pacific Railway Company to Congress for aid, made its appearance to-day in the shape of a bill asking the Government to guarantee five per cent interest on a new set of bonds. The bill is accompanied by a long memorial giving the reason for this demand, which concludes as follows, viz.: “Your memorialists while waiting your action in the premises, hope that it will not be considered obtrusive to respectfully suggest as the result of our experience in this undertaking, that the Northern Pacific Railway can be completed and equipped within a reasonable time, and all its obligations met, if the Government will guarantee the interest at the rate of five per cent per annum on the company’s bonds for security. Against the liability to be incurred by this guarantee the company will hand over its land grant to the Government, to be managed by the General Land Office, the lands to be sold in limited quantities to actual settlers, at prices not less than those of the public lands similarly situated, the proceeds of these sales to be applied to meet any liability of the Government on account of the guarantee; the net earnings of the road also to go into the United States treasury. As further security against this guarantee, and to insure the payment by the company of the interest thus guaranteed, its bonds to the amount of $10,000 per mile shall be left in the United States treasury, and in the event of default or probable default may be sold in the open market, and the proceeds applied to meet deficiencies. A sufficient sinking fund to redeem the company’s bonds shall be established in five years after the completion of the road.” (Brainerd Tribune, 16 May 1874, p. 4, c. 1)

23 May
SPECIALS from Washington say the petition of the Northern Pacific Railroad Company for aid from the Government has not the remotest chance of serious consideration, either by the committee, or by either branch of Congress. The matter will have to go over, with many other things, until next winter. (Brainerd Tribune, 23 May 1874, p. 4, c. 1)

26 May

THE NORTHWEST.


Lieutenant Colonel George A. Custer, ca. 1875.
Source: Unknown
BISMARCK, May 26.—The Peninah, the first boat from the upper Missouri, arrived last night at Bismarck with seventy tons of ore from the Montana mines to go east over the Northern Pacific railroad. Large quantities of freight from the east for Montana are now going forward over the Northern Pacific road to Bismarck, thence by steamboats.
An expedition of adventurers to the celebrated Black Hills of Dakota Territory is organizing at Bismarck, to start about the 20th of June. The Black Hills are supposed to be rich in gold and silver, but it is all supposition and tradition, as none but Indians have ever explored them.
SIOUX CITY, IOWA, May 26.—The Journal this morning publishes information received from the Upper Missouri, that Gen. Custer is preparing a large force at Fort Abraham Lincoln, to move into the Black Hills about the first of June. This force is to consist of ten full companies of cavalry, with a full battery of Gatling guns. In anticipation of such movement on the part of the military force of the government, an expedition composed of men accustomed to frontier life, has been quietly organizing here for the past month, and will leave for the Black Hills region on the first of June. (Brainerd Tribune, 30 May 1874, p. 1, c. 6)


30 May

THE PROSPECT.


It is generally believed among those who would be likely to do the best guessing in the matter, that there is no prospect of Congress passing the bill or taking any action at all in the matter of guaranteeing the bonds of the Northern Pacific Railroad at the present session. The probability is, that the whole matter, after having been merely broached to Congress, will remain with the Committee until next winter—or the next session—when it is believed its prompt passage, in something of the same form as introduced, is a foregone conclusion. This conclusion is, we think, fully warranted, too, because of the indisputable fact that the success of the Northern Pacific Railroad has largely to do with the good of the country in very many respects, which is now rapidly coming to be acknowledged by hosts of men of influence and position who have heretofore given this great continental belt the cold shoulder, or been positively hostile to it. In fact, the Northern Pacific enterprise, after having been abused, cursed, and most damnably libeled and maligned by writers bought up and hired to misrepresent it to the last degree of meaness, by jealous and interested parties, is springing up through the debris of malignity green as a garden plant, and has to-day more friends, and better friends, all over the country, than it ever had. “Truth crushed to earth will rise again,” is a quotation that can be used with the greatest propriety in connection with the history of the Northern Pacific, and with most singular appropriateness.
Not only is the enterprise, as a whole, viewing its importance to the country after it will have been completed, coming to be considered as entitled to all that has ever been claimed for it by its warmest advocates, but the importance to the Northwest, just as it now stands, is being acknowledged. It has opened up and peopled, for six hundred miles, a section of country that without it would have still been an unproductive, unexplored wilderness, instead of the very garden that it is. In rooms of the scores of thriving towns and thousands of farm houses, and the multitudes of intelligent citizens and thriving, Christian communities that now are found throughout the country traversed by that portion of the road already completed, without it would yet have been a waste, and asylum for hostile and marauding Indians. Where all is now productiveness to the people from crowded eastern communities, a home to the European emigrant, and hence a rapidly developing and immense source of revenue to the Government itself, would, without the Northern Pacific Railroad, have yet remained a worse than useless appendage to our scope of territory. (Brainerd Tribune, 30 May 1874, p. 1, c. 3)

06 June
TO LEAVE US.—Mr. Spaulding, who has for so long been chief clerk in the Northern Pacific Land Office, with Mr. Power, is soon to leave Brainerd to take a similar position in the Adjutant General’s office, at St. Paul, to which he has recently been appointed. While we most heartily congratulate Mr. Spaulding on his promotion, and while we could say none too much in favor of his eminent fitness for the new position-as a No. 1 gentleman and correct business man—yet we don’t like the way things have “panned out,” for all that; because it takes from among us a respected and valuable citizen and an estimable family. But—well—yes, of course; that’s the way it is; so, good-bye, Spaulding, God bless you, all the same. (Brainerd Tribune, 06 June 1874, p. 1, c. 4)

SEE: 13 June 1874

SOMETHING ABOUT N. P. TREE PLANTING.


From Mr. J. B. Power, the enterprising and efficient Land Commissioner of the Northern Pacific, whose headquarters is in this place, we learned a few facts about the tree-planting enterprise of the Company, worthy of note.
The Land Department has this season established a nursery of forty acres, located on Goose Creek, twenty-five miles west of Fargo. There is now growing in the nursery, in the most thrifty condition, and of a most astonishing growth, 100,000 cuttings, and some five million seedlings. The varieties are soft maple, white willow, box alder, Lombardy popular and other varieties. The seed for the soft maple was planted along during the first days of last month, (May) and already the little baby trees are all up some eight or ten inches above ground, and growing away “like mad.” The cuttings, too, have all lived, and are rushing their beautiful green sprouts along, seeming to vie with their little neighbors, the seedlings, to see which can reach the height of towering trees the quickest. Altogether they are said to present a magnificent sight by those who have seen them within the past few days. A force of men with cultivators are working and guarding the nursery, subduing the land and there can be scarcely a doubt but that the enterprise will prove a most satisfactory success. The plan of the Company is that next year, and in the future, transplanting can be done from this nursery all along the line, for live snow fences, wind-breaks around buildings, etc. The Company also expect to be able to supply each purchaser of land from them with an ample allowance of, live, thirty trees acclimated, hardy and growing, with which the settler on prairie lands along the line can in six or eight years have a “home-made” forest in which to live, and from which to draw his supplies of fuel and timber, in just such form and quantity as he may desire.
The varieties now growing in the nursery are considered a “sure thing,” and other varieties of forest trees, as well as fruit-trees, ornamental shrubbery, etc., will be experimented with, as the Company gets their nursery grounds prepared for it.
This enterprise, on the part of the Company, is most praiseworthy, and it will be cheerful news to all, that it has thus far proved, and is likely to prove such an abundant success. It is confidently asserted by all who have seen this, and other smaller enterprises in tree-planting, and who know the wonderful properties and richness of the soil, throughout the Red River country, that in ten years hence all that section will be filled with heavy and well-ordered groves of timber—and then it will certainly be a very Eden, as nothing is lacking now but timber. The Company having started the tree-planting so extensively, and so timely, and so successfully in that country, will not only stimulate others but will materially aid all in starting at an early day and almost simultaneously into the grand work.
For his foresight, care, enterprise and patience Mr. Power deserves credit only equaled by the Company’s liberality in enabling him to go forward in what he and they will, we hope, live to experience as an inestimable blessing to the country and thousands of people. (Brainerd Tribune, 06 June 1874, p. 1, c. 4)

SEE: 05 October 1871
SEE: 01 April 1873
SEE: 03 May 1873

SEE: 01 December 1873
SEE: 27 December 1873
SEE: 10 January 1874
SEE: 12 September 1874
SEE: 28 November 1874
SEE: 06 February 1875
SEE: 20 March 1875
SEE: 12 April 1875
SEE: 07 August 1875
SEE: 09 October 1875
SEE: 19 February 1876
SEE: 22 July 1876
SEE: 07 October 1876
SEE: 25 April 1877
SEE: 14 June 1877
SEE: 04 August 1877
SEE: 06 October 1877
SEE: 23 October 1877
SEE: 02 November 1877
SEE: 18 June 1878
SEE: 20 July 1878
SEE: 06 August 1878
SEE: 21 September 1878
SEE: 28 September 1878
SEE: 10 May 1879
SEE: 05 July 1879
SEE: 30 July 1879
SEE: 27 September 1879
SEE: 18 February 1880
SEE: 21 February 1880
SEE: 28 August 1880
SEE: 31 August 1880
SEE: 04 September 1880
SEE: 16 September 1880
SEE: 09 October 1880
SEE: 09 December 1880
SEE: 25 December 1880
SEE: 17 February 1881
SEE: 21 February 1881
SEE: 26 February 1881
SEE: 09 April 1881
SEE: 13 April 1881
SEE: 23 April 1881
SEE: 19 May 1881
SEE: 11 June 1881
SEE: 23 July 1881
SEE: 01 September 1881
SEE: 03 October 1881
SEE: 06 December 1881
SEE: 30 July 1882
SEE: 02 August 1882
SEE: 05 February 1917

13 June
FINE GROUNDS.—The grounds and premises around about the Headquarters Hotel—in the rear yards—are presenting a most beautiful appearance now. Everything is clean and tidy as a new pin. Besides the beautiful sward of clover and genuine shamrock, which is Mr. Weed’s especial delight, is considerable of a garden, which was planted and particularly cared for by Mr. and Mrs. Bartell—the accomplished house-keepers of the Headquarters. All the many kinds of vegetables and plants, besides being beautifully arranged in the spacious grounds are wonderfully advanced, and it does one’s eyes good to look upon them. It is everything in “knowing how to keep a hotel,” for a fact. (Brainerd Tribune, 13 June 1874, p. 1, c. 4)

ERRATUM.—In last week’s “family journal” we made an error, inasmuch as we said Mr. Spaulding had been appointed to a position “in the Adjutant General’s office.” We should have said in the SURVEYOR General’s office. We tried at first to saddle the mistake off on to the compositor; but alas! it wouldn’t work—it was “we” who did it with our little pencil. (Brainerd Tribune, 13 June 1874, p. 1, c. 6)

A KIND REMEMBRANCE.


Upon the retirement from the Land Department N. P. R. R., Mr. S. M. Spaulding, who has so long been Chief Clerk therein, was presented with a handsome gift, in the shape of a purse of money, by his office colleagues. We give below the letter of the “boys” accompanying the gift, and Mr. Spaulding’s reply:

BRAINERD, MINN., JUNE 13th, 1874.

S. M. Spaulding, Esq., Chief Clerk:
DEAR SIR.—Your fellow associates in the office of the Land Department of the N. P. R. R. take this opportunity, as you are about resigning your position as Chief Clerk, to express our regret that connections so long and so pleasantly held are to be severed, at the same time congratulating you upon being called to a higher position, easier work and metropolitan surroundings. While wishing for you a pleasant and profitable future, and extending the right hand of fellowship in saying our farewells, without letting that right hand know what its fellow is doing, accept from the left hand (not, however, as a left handed compliment) the enclosed token of remembrance, not in any way to be considered as the measure of our esteem, but as an expression only of our esteem and good will.
Very truly, your friends,
THE EMPLOYEES OF THE GEN’L. OFFICE LAND DEPT. N. P. R. R., Brainerd, Minn.

_____


BRAINERD, MINN., June 15th, 1874.

The Employees of the Gen’l. Office Land Dept. N. P. R. R. Co.:
GENTLEMEN.—Your communication, by the hand of Mr. Kopper, and contents, are received. For your kind wishes and substantial remembrance I thank you most sincerely.
It is not unusual where numbers are associated together, for them, upon the retiring of one of their members, to present him with some keepsake, but I had not expected such from our small corps; it is, therefore, doubly a surprise and gratification to receive so generous a gift, and I beg to assure you I shall “put it away” where it will be to me a reminder of the pleasant years passed together. I wish also to thank you for the uniform kindness which I have always received from each and every one and while I have essentially severed my connection with the Land Department, I shall not forget, and trust shall not be forgotten by my fellow associates.
Again thanking you for the “right hand of fellowship” so cordially extended, and especially the other hand that “shipped” the responsibility so munificently, I bid you all affectionately, Farewell.
I am, very truly yours,
S. M. SPAULDING.
(Brainerd Tribune, 20 June 1874, p. 1, c. 7)

SEE: 06 June 1874

NOTE: This move, I believe, paves the way for Charles F. Kindred to arrive on the scene as Power’s Chief Clerk in the Land Department.

SEE: 07 November 1874

20 June
THANKS.—We can scarcely express sufficient thanks to Mr. Lewis, the Master Mechanic of the N. P. Machine Shops here for the favor he did us the other day. We broke a very intricate piece of our machinery, and for some hours there was sadness around this establishment, as we saw no way of getting it “fixed” this side of Chicago. But upon going to Mr. Lewis, and after he had examined it critically, he expressed the belief that he could make the repair. The result was, that one of his fine mechanics, with Mr. Lewis’ counsel, finished the job in a few hours, and the machine is now far better and more substantial than it was originally, and a better finished job. All we can say is that it does one’s soul good to meet a “white man”—for it is so very seldom you strike one in this world. (Brainerd Tribune, 20 June 1874, p. 1, c. 5)

27 June

THE EXTENSION.


As we understand it, with no positive authority at hand, the extension of nine months given by Congress to the St. Paul & Pacific Railroad, in which to complete its branches—the St. Vincent and the Brainerd Branches—means that they shall be completed between now and winter; also, that the bill, as passed, places the whole matter within the jurisdiction of our State authorities, and that if the Company does not prove to the Governor by September 1st next its ability and willingness to complete these branches, that he will then have full power to contract with any other parties for their immediate completion within the time specified.
We venture to say that this arrangement means positively, at last, the completion of the Brainerd Branch this season. For, if we remember correctly, we have Governor Davis’ own word that he shall exercise his privilege in this matter to its fullest extent, and that our branches SHALL BE BUILT this time, and no ifs nor ands about it. Governor Davis is alive to the great importance of the completion of the system of railroads which these branches will give to the northern end of the State, and he is the man that will look well to the interests of any and all sections of our young State, and if any golden opportunities are lost it will not be his fault. If these are the provisions of this bill that has passed, we stake our reputation that Governor Davis will see to it that they are enforced, and that our long needed branch railroads will be built without delay! for we know the man. (Brainerd Tribune, 27 June 1874, p. 1, c. 6)

THE N. P. pay car has been the full length of the road this week making its regular monthly payment to all employees. The Northern Pacific is able to pay all its expenses, the year round, and has piles of the “stuff” left in the bag. (Brainerd Tribune, 27 June 1874, p. 1, c. 7)

04 July
THE Brainerd Branch railroad will be built and in running order, possibly this year, but at any rate within the bounds of the recent extension granted by Congress. Inside a year the un-thought of advantages of Brainerd, as a manufacturing town, will begin to be taken hold of. Thousands of visitors, sojourners and tourists will make Brainerd their headquarters annually, after the “Branch” is completed. Brainerd is naturally the most healthy and delightful retreat anywhere in the western country. All who have interests in Brainerd must not “fool them away,” or they will regret it. The money panic, and general depression in business of the past year, will all pass away with the snow next spring. Brainerd is bound to be a good, lively, thrifty town, full of enterprising, liberal people as permanent residents. We think more of Brainerd to-day, and have greater faith in its future prospects than we ever had before. (Brainerd Tribune, 04 July 1874, p. 1, c. 4)

11 July
PERSONAL.—Gen. Geo. W. Cass, President Northern Pacific Railroad, and party came up from Sauk Rapids along the Brainerd Branch, and thence west to Bismarck and return, this week. He was accompanied by General Manager Mead, C. W. Cass, and J. N. Hutchinson. Whether the gazing upon it by this distinguished party will raise the dead Branch or not, remains to be seen. We can discover no immediate effect upon it, but shall watch it daily, and if we see any signs of life we shall hasten to toot our bugle again on the subject of the Brainerd Branch. (Brainerd Tribune, 11 July 1874, p. 1, c. 6)

18 July
WINDOW SMASHING.—It makes one sick to look at the present condition of the fine foundry building, of Parker, Bailey, Howson & Co., in this place. This foundry has been idle for a year past, and the large windows are literally smashed to pieces by boys throwing stones through them. There is scarcely a whole light left in the building. We have no words that would sufficiently denounce the graceless young vagabonds who have it in them to perpetrate such deeds. Parents of such children are responsible, and they ought to teach them better if they had to skin them to do it. It is an outrage on civilization. (Brainerd Tribune, 18 July 1874, p. 1, c. 7)

31 July
LEFT US.—Our fellow Citizen, Mr. W. S. Heathcote, who has for two years been foreman in the wood department of the N. P. Machine Shops; has left his place, and our city to go onto his farm out near Wadena—in other words, friend Heathcote has “granged.” He has a beautiful place out in the Wadena country, and hereafter will only answer to the call of “Farmer Heathcote.” Upon bidding his old comrades good-bye on Friday evening, up at the shops, they exhibited their regard for their old foreman by handing him a beautiful stem-winding American watch, from Mr. Strauss’ jewelry store, which cost ninety dollars. There was no “fuss and feather” about it; but it came as a token of regard from men whose hearts are honest and true, and whose natures are in keeping with their professions—noble and generous. Mr. H. was very much affected at so unexpected a kindness and was justly as proud as a man could be of his beautiful and valuable present. May peace, happiness and abundant harvests be the portion of Mr. Heathcote in his farm home, is the wish of all of us. (Brainerd Tribune, 01 August 1874, p. 1, c. 7)

05 September
THE Railroad Company is erecting a large building at this place for the protection of its numerous passenger coaches. It is also constructing an immense water tank for the use of the machine shops. (Brainerd Tribune, 05 September 1874, p. 1, c. 4)

12 September

Wonderful Growth.


As will be remembered, we gave a full account, a few months ago, of the tree culture and nursery being engaged in by the Land Department of the Northern Pacific, out at Goose Creek in Dakota, a few miles west of Fargo. Mr. Power, the hard-working and efficient Land Commissioner of the Company, with headquarters at Brainerd, has given this enterprise his careful attention, and is being nobly rewarded. A specimen of the season’s growth of several kinds of trees have been sent in to the office here. The cuttings and the seeds were planted about the 10th of May last, and now show a growth as follows:

FROM CUTTINGS.

White willow, seven feet.
Lombardy poplar, six feet.

FROM SEED.

Box Alder, three feet.
Soft Maple, two feet.
White Elm, fourteen inches.
Oak, eighteen inches.
These are but a fair, average sample of the whole nursery. Their growth is strong and heavy, the stems being woody and vigorous. There are now two and a half million of these hardy young forest trees, and Mr. Power confidently expects them to all go through the winter in good shape, and in five years, we certainly think, the Goose Creek Nursery will have supplied the whole prairie country along the line with hundreds of wildernesses. (Brainerd Tribune, 12 September 1874, p. 1, c. 5)

SEE: 05 October 1871
SEE: 01 April 1873
SEE: 03 May 1873

SEE: 01 December 1873
SEE: 27 December 1873
SEE: 10 January 1874
SEE: 06 June 1874
SEE: 28 November 1874
SEE: 06 February 1875
SEE: 20 March 1875
SEE: 12 April 1875
SEE: 07 August 1875
SEE: 09 October 1875
SEE: 19 February 1876
SEE: 22 July 1876
SEE: 07 October 1876
SEE: 25 April 1877
SEE: 14 June 1877
SEE: 04 August 1877
SEE: 06 October 1877
SEE: 23 October 1877
SEE: 02 November 1877
SEE: 18 June 1878
SEE: 20 July 1878
SEE: 06 August 1878
SEE: 21 September 1878
SEE: 28 September 1878
SEE: 10 May 1879
SEE: 05 July 1879
SEE: 30 July 1879
SEE: 27 September 1879
SEE: 18 February 1880
SEE: 21 February 1880
SEE: 28 August 1880
SEE: 31 August 1880
SEE: 04 September 1880
SEE: 16 September 1880
SEE: 09 October 1880
SEE: 09 December 1880
SEE: 25 December 1880
SEE: 17 February 1881
SEE: 21 February 1881
SEE: 26 February 1881
SEE: 09 April 1881
SEE: 13 April 1881
SEE: 23 April 1881
SEE: 19 May 1881
SEE: 11 June 1881
SEE: 23 July 1881
SEE: 01 September 1881
SEE: 03 October 1881
SEE: 06 December 1881
SEE: 30 July 1882
SEE: 02 August 1882
SEE: 05 February 1917

05 October

Fatal Accident.


One of the workmen on Railroad Section 12, (the section first east from this place, under charge of Mr. Robert Cowley) met with his death on Monday morning last about four o’clock, in being run over by an engine. His name was August Vest, a Swede. He had been in this country about three years, and had been with Mr. Cowley for the past two years. He was a single man, about thirty-five years, and has no relatives in this country, we believe. There is a man working on Section 6, however, that knew him in the old country, and is acquainted with his people; he will doubtless be able to impart the sad news to the family of Mr. Vest in Sweden. It seems he had become intoxicated during Sunday night, and was on his way up to the Section house, when he lay down across the rails, right in front of the Shops, and fell asleep. The engine was backing down from the round house to the depot to take the early freight east, and it being dark, and the headlight of the engine being in an opposite direction, the engineer was unable to see him. His remains were given a respectable burial in the cemetery, after the body had been viewed, and the circumstances made a note of by Justice Burns—the Coroner being absent. (Brainerd Tribune, 10 October 1874, p. 1, c. 3)

10 October

The Northern Pacific Region.


We take the following scattering extracts from a lengthy and handsomely written letter which appears in the Monroe (Mich.) Commercial. The letter was written by Mr. S. Martindale, who spent a week or two along the line visiting with his old time friend and class mate, Thos. P. Cantwell, Esq., of Brainerd:
We told you in our last of our experiences as far as Brainerd on the N. P. R. R., at the crossing of the Mississippi. We knew it would rouse the Nimrod born in every true lover of woods and streams; and when thus inborn, yields to no exorcism of any kind.

NP Bridge, ca. 1874.
Source: Crow Wing County Historical Society
The Mississippi at this point is about 400 feet wide, and spanned by a Howe truss bridge 80 feet above high water mark. Stepping aboard one of the N. P. R. R.’s magnificent coaches at the Headquarters Hotel, we are soon moving out and along upon one of the smoothest, if not the smoothest, running roads in the United States. Thirty miles an hour is the speed, while we would suspect it only 15 or 20 miles, if our eyes were not outside upon the objects whirling past us. Grand and glorious is the sparkling sunshine in these northern days! The senses are braced to the plenitude of new experiences, and the spirits dance to a chorus of new joys. We are soon running past the many lakes where we have “wetted our line,” and were you here, you would say, “surely your lines have been cast in pleasant places.”
The rude attire of the wilderness has yielded to a floral exuberance and vegetable wealth unsurpassed in any part of our vast and fertile country and you would be ready to say, “Jay Cooke’s pamphlets are not all a fable.”
The date of the sportsman’s tether—August 15th—is not yet passed, and our jottings of personal experience are few in the line of “fur, fin and feather;” but we know the forests are full of pigeons, deer and bear, the lakes of fish, and the prairies swarm with coveys of prairie chickens that have gone “unflushed” since the days of Noah.
At Fargo, on the west bank of the Red River, the train draws up in front of another of those Headquarters Hotels, and we step out upon its broad piazza, and through spacious, airy halls to our room, made as comfortable for us as could be at any metropolitan center 2,000 miles away. From the upper piazza and the observatory above, our eyes reach out upon the expanse of prairie—to the north and east, skirted by the heavy growth of timber that marks the sinuous course of the Red River—to the south, the vision is unobstructed, except by the sparsely scattered pioneers’ cabins; and to the west, the straight, undeviating track of the road points with unerring finger “whither the star of empire takes its course.”
Please say to the people “down east,” that to the sportsman, to the overworked in delving for sixpences, to the adventurer, for childhood’s past-time, or manhood’s sterner joys, there can be no more favorable retreat from the warfare of life than out along, and upon the N. P. R. R., with headquarters at Brainerd. We shall expect you to form one of our company to this region of newness and delight, at a future time. (Brainerd Tribune, 10 October 1874, p. 4, c. 1)

24 October
SOCIAL HALL.—Mayor White has kindly offered the ladies of the Congregational church the free use, for six months, of the pleasant office formerly occupied by Lyman Bridges. The pleasant entertainments and social gatherings formerly held in the Reading Room will now be removed to this larger and more commodious building, and it is the intention of the ladies to make a corresponding increase in the attractions offered. Its use as a Social Hall will be inaugurated with an Oyster Supper on Friday evening, Oct. 30th. The best of oysters—the choicest grapes. Come and see, and bring a friend! (Brainerd Tribune, 24 October 1874, p. 1, c. 6)

07 November
OUR friend, Mr. Kindred, of the N. P. Land Department, has removed his fine residence building—formerly L. B. Perry's house—to his two fine lots on the corner of Sixth and Norwood [sic] [Kingwood] streets, just north of the General Office building one block. This is a fine location, and Mr. K. will have a beautiful home when he once gets the place fixed up. May he long enjoy it with us, provided, you know—well, provided he does not insist in "going it alone" much longer, you see. (Brainerd Tribune, 07 November 1874, p. 1, c. 4)

KINDRED
SEE: 14 November 1874
SEE: 28 November 1874
SEE: 19 February 1876
SEE: 07 June 1876
SEE: 23 March 1878
SEE: 28 September 1878
SEE: 18 January 1879
SEE: 31 May 1879
SEE: 27 September 1879
SEE: 09 December 1880
SEE: 17 February 1881
SEE: 21 February 1881
SEE: 09 April 1881
SEE: 13 April 1881
SEE: 23 April 1881
SEE: 19 May 1881
SEE: 11 June 1881
SEE: 23 July 1881
SEE: 03 October 1881
SEE: 06 December 1881
SEE: 30 July 1882
SEE: 02 August 1882
SEE: 20 September 1883
SEE: 23 September 1883
SEE: 26 August 1885
SEE: 13 December 1887
SEE: 31 May 1889
SEE: 25 March 1898
SEE: 05 February 1917

THE ENGINEERS.


Locomotive engineers of the West belonging to the so-called Brotherhood are preparing to resist with all their combined strength, a reduction of wages, which the principal lines have decided on. The strike of last spring had its unpleasant features, and the one in contemplation, if it is forced to an issue, will be even more unrelenting. Grand Master Wilson, more than any other man, curbed the violent spirit of the engineers in the last strike, and he paid for his moderation and prudence with his official life. His successor, according to common belief, will approve any action of the Western Division engineers, however contrary to the regulations and precedents of the Brotherhood. (Brainerd Tribune, 07 November 1874, p. 2, c. 3)

14 November

Our Park.


At last we are happy to be able to announce that our public park, in front of the Headquarters Hotel, is to be brought into full fledged existence by the Railroad company, and work has already begun. It will be a block in length, and occupy all that space lying between the railroad track and Front Street and a most beautiful place it can be made, too. Of course the company has placed the whole work under the supervision of Mike Smith, the champion lawn planter and tree culturist of the Northwest, and who, assisted by his son Dennis, has charge of the grand and wonderfully successful Northern Pacific Nursery at Goose Creek, Dakota. Mr. Smith, and Dennis his son, have already laid out the ground of the park and are getting the trees, which will be chiefly soft and hard maple. Owing to the lateness of the season Mr. Smith will probably not be able to do more than get in the trees this fall and put up a temporary fence. But in the spring he will push the park to completion, and you can wager high that if “Mike” lives to complete the job it will be made a lasting and valuable ornament to our beautiful young city. There will be two rows of trees around the outer edge of the park, with gravel walk between, and the grounds will be entered only from the corners; from each corner there will be a walk straight to the center, where will be two circular rows of trees—with walk between—and within this grand center will be a mammoth fountain, fed from the water main that supplies the machine shops, which will have head sufficient to throw the crystal spray twenty feet in the air. No one can estimate the extent of beauty that will thus be added to our town, and the benefit it will be to property, when completed. The company deserve the warmest thanks of our citizens for their liberality and kindness in contributing to us so great and valuable an ornament; and long live Mike Smith, who has been mainly instrumental in bringing it about—always having an eye to the beautiful, he could not overlook so handsome a spot. (Brainerd Tribune, 14 November 1874, p. 1, c. 7)

Mr. Kindred, of the Land Department of the Northern Pacific Railroad; has been in town a part of this week, and has made it lively selling lands and town lots, and making many happy by giving them titles to their farms. He is one of the most genial and accommodating men connected with the road. The company are putting their lands down low, so as to induce settlers to come into this country. By purchasing N. P. bonds, which are taken by the company at par, brings their lands within the reach of everyone, and this will be a great benefit to the country, as a large share of it will thus be occupied by the actual settler.—Fargo Mirror. (Brainerd Tribune, 14 November 1874, p. 4, c. 1)

KINDRED:
SEE: 07 November 1874
SEE: 28 November 1874
SEE: 19 February 1876
SEE: 07 June 1876
SEE: 23 March 1878
SEE: 28 September 1878
SEE: 18 January 1879
SEE: 31 May 1879
SEE: 27 September 1879
SEE: 26 June 1880
SEE: 31 August 1880
SEE: 09 December 1880
SEE: 25 December 1880
SEE: 17 February 1881
SEE: 21 February 1881
SEE: 09 April 1881
SEE: 13 April 1881
SEE: 23 April 1881
SEE: 19 May 1881
SEE: 11 June 1881
SEE: 23 July 1881
SEE: 03 October 1881
SEE: 06 December 1881
SEE: 30 July 1882
SEE: 02 August 1882
SEE: 20 September 1883
SEE: 23 September 1883
SEE: 26 August 1885
SEE: 13 December 1887
SEE: 31 May 1889
SEE: 25 March 1898
SEE: 05 February 1917

17 November
General Manager C. W. Mead spent Tuesday in the city, on his return from the west end, and returned to St. Paul on Wednesday. General Mead’s “extra” was the last train of the season over the Dakota Division, and the two hundred miles of Road between Fargo and Bismarck closed its career, for the winter, at the heels of the General’s train. Bismarck has, therefore, holed up with the prairie dogs, and will scarcely again be heard of till the cactus blooms once more. (Brainerd Tribune, 21 November 1874, p. 1, c. 3)

21 November
AS WILL be seen, the winter time table on the Northern Pacific has been inaugurated. The trains from both ways now lay over at Brainerd every night, and the hotel keepers are happier than usual. (Brainerd Tribune, 21 November 1874, p. 1, c. 5)

28 November

Some Curiosities.


Dr. John C. Rosser, Northern Pacific physician and coroner, ca. 1908.
Source: Special Collections, University of Virginia Library, Charlottesville, Virginia
Dropping into the office of our friend, Dr. J. C. Rosser, the other day, we enjoyed a most pleasant hour. The Doctor, wherever known is esteemed a man of culture and refinement, a master in his profession, a social lord, and a gentleman in the finest construction of the term. Dr. Rosser has charge of the Northern Pacific Medical Department, and during his occupancy of their fine medical office he has added many rare specimens to the museum thereto attached. Among the latest additions, we notice a fully developed skull of a white man, found close to Crystal Springs, which are located on the Northern Pacific in Dakota, about midway between Fargo and Bismarck. The skull gives every evidence of having been at one time, many decades ago, the “cap-sheaf” to an intelligent anatomy, and is certainly the finest specimen in the collection of skulls. Tradition among the Indians in that region leads to the almost positive fact that it is the skull of an English Lord, who many years ago made a tour to the Selkirk Settlement, and who with his party, undertook the exploration of the country across from the Red River to the Missouri River, but who, about midway in that unexplored country, fell into the hands of the hostile natives; the Chief (the Lord) of the party was taken into captivity and was massacred at the verge of the wonderful springs mentioned, and his body left to decay and his bones to bleach on the bosom of the plains, until the onward progress of civilization came along and found this relic of a once highly intelligent and adventurous man; while the remainder of the party shared a similar fate in other directions; but the superstition of the natives taught them that the most important of the party of strange white beings should, of right to the Great Spirit, be slaughtered at the most sacred spot in their domain, which was at what is now known as the celebrated Crystal Springs, on the Northern Pacific. A hole through the right side of the crown of the head, seems to show that he was killed by the stroke of a pointed war club, made of flint stone, occasionally seen among the Sioux even at this late day.
Another skull is of a young native, which belonged undoubtedly to the pre-history race of this vast country, or in other words, the Mound Builder’s period. The reasons for this conclusion are these:
The skull itself differs in several respects from those of the natives of the present day, and exhibits a much higher degree of intellect and cultivation; a stronger reason is, that this one seems to have been regularly interred—a mode of burial generally accorded to the famous Mound Builders, while the natives of more modern times ”bury their dead in a tree-top or up on a scaffold.”
Many other fossiliferous specimens are to be seen, which excite the wonder of the intelligent mind; some human bones that have been buried so long that they have turned into solid stone, but are perfect as may be in their form. One bone in particular, was well worthy of the study of those who understand the human anatomy. It is a bone, the Doctor informed us, that belonged to the arm from the elbow to the shoulder. Its peculiarity was in the raised ridges extending along its length, which never appear to any degree whatever on that bone unless the man be a Hercules of strength and physical power; this being the case, the possessor of this petrified bone must have been a terror, and had a muscle upon which could have cracked anything from a hazelnut to a quartz rock without breaking the skin.
Several most wonderful geological specimens ornament Dr. Rosser’s cabinet, which for real merit in the kingdom geology, surpass anything we have ever had the pleasure of examining, all selected from along the Northern Pacific.
Speaking of the practice of the natives of the present day, in “burying their dead in the tree tops,” calls to mind an item we had forgotten to mention. Dr. Rosser has some billets of wood cut from a tree recently, that contain bones thoroughly imbedded in the sound wood, having been placed in the fork of the tree many years ago, the tree as it grew enclosed and preserved them as perfectly as though petrified, until the tree was cut down and split open, disclosed them in their wonderful tomb. (Brainerd Tribune, 28 November 1874, p. 1, c. 3)

SHIPMENTS OF EVERGREENS.—Our fellow townsmen, Messrs. Keating & Hallett, have shipped a car load of beautiful evergreen Christmas trees—principally balsam and fir—to Chicago, and also some twenty sacks of running pine and prince’s feather, with which to make wreaths and other ornaments. The car contained a thousand trees, which will unquestionably be the finest Christmas trees ever introduced into Chicago, and the enterprising firm will doubtless realize handsomely on their venture. Mr. Keating accompanied the trees and will retail them out. (Brainerd Tribune, 28 November 1874, p. 1, c. 5)

28 November
Mr. J. B. POWER, Land Commissioner N. P. R. R., who has been east for some time, accompanied by his family, returned a few days ago to St. Paul.
Mr. Kindred, Chief Clerk in Mr. Power’s office, left on Monday last for a visit of a week or so to Chicago. We are not positively informed as to whether friend K. will bring his family back with him or not—hope he may, however. (Brainerd Tribune, 28 November 1874, p. 1, c. 6)

POWER:
SEE: 05 October 1871
SEE: 01 April 1873
SEE: 03 May 1873

SEE: 01 December 1873
SEE: 27 December 1873
SEE: 10 January 1874
SEE: 06 June 1874
SEE: 12 September 1874
SEE: 06 February 1875
SEE: 20 March 1875
SEE: 12 April 1875
SEE: 07 August 1875
SEE: 09 October 1875
SEE: 19 February 1876
SEE: 22 July 1876
SEE: 07 October 1876
SEE: 25 April 1877
SEE: 14 June 1877
SEE: 04 August 1877
SEE: 06 October 1877
SEE: 23 October 1877
SEE: 02 November 1877
SEE: 18 June 1878
SEE: 20 July 1878
SEE: 06 August 1878
SEE: 21 September 1878
SEE: 28 September 1878
SEE: 10 May 1879
SEE: 05 July 1879
SEE: 30 July 1879
SEE: 27 September 1879
SEE: 18 February 1880
SEE: 21 February 1880
SEE: 28 August 1880
SEE: 31 August 1880
SEE: 04 September 1880
SEE: 16 September 1880
SEE: 09 October 1880
SEE: 09 December 1880
SEE: 25 December 1880
SEE: 17 February 1881
SEE: 21 February 1881
SEE: 26 February 1881
SEE: 09 April 1881
SEE: 13 April 1881
SEE: 23 April 1881
SEE: 19 May 1881
SEE: 11 June 1881
SEE: 23 July 1881
SEE: 01 September 1881
SEE: 03 October 1881
SEE: 06 December 1881
SEE: 30 July 1882
SEE: 02 August 1882
SEE: 05 February 1917

KINDRED:
SEE: 07 November 1874
SEE: 14 November 1874
SEE: 19 February 1876
SEE: 07 June 1876
SEE: 23 March 1878
SEE: 28 September 1878
SEE: 18 January 1879
SEE: 31 May 1879
SEE: 27 September 1879
SEE: 26 June 1880
SEE: 31 August 1880
SEE: 09 December 1880
SEE: 25 December 1880
SEE: 17 February 1881
SEE: 21 February 1881
SEE: 09 April 1881
SEE: 13 April 1881
SEE: 23 April 1881
SEE: 19 May 1881
SEE: 11 June 1881
SEE: 23 July 1881
SEE: 03 October 1881
SEE: 06 December 1881
SEE: 30 July 1882
SEE: 02 August 1882
SEE: 20 September 1883
SEE: 23 September 1883
SEE: 26 August 1885
SEE: 13 December 1887
SEE: 31 May 1889
SEE: 25 March 1898
SEE: 05 February 1917

05 December

A Line from Jo. Wilson.


Editors Brainerd Tribune:
For the next few years I expect to make my home in Texas, at a town called Palestine; R. B. Small, H. J. Small, Mike Grace, Geo. Wadham, Frank Fakir, J. Glispin, Henry Doll, and a host of other N. P. boys, are congregating down there, for the purpose of showing the “Texicans” how to run a Railroad. When I get there you will hear from me. So, goodbye. How is the Literary? Regards to the boys.
“CHO VILSON.”
(Brainerd Tribune, 05 December 1874, p. 1, c. 6)

08 December

The Grand “Close” at Brainerd.


As is mentioned elsewhere, the event of the season thus far was the opening of the new Headquarters Hotel at Fargo, on Tuesday night. During Wednesday, Mr. E. W. Weed, the jolly host of the Headquarters Hotel at Brainerd, bethought himself that as the ball was opened at Fargo, he would just quietly go to work and have the thing closed at his house on Wednesday evening, upon the return of the excursion train, east. Accordingly, he called to his side a friend or two, to assist in carrying out the details, and about noon invitations commenced flying about the City of the Pines, to the effect that all hands were wanted at his house that evening to indulge in a little hop of welcome to the returning excursionists. As only Brainerd can do, our good people rallied, and at 8 o’clock p. m., the spacious parlors of the Headquarters fairly shone with the beauty of Brainerd, and a little later the great dining hall, with some seventy-five couples, was ablaze with the social cheer of one of the most royal parties that has ever been witnessed on the line; all dancing to the music of Hazen’s band, and in short, just going in for amusement, social greetings and pastimes of the most sensible kinds. It was truly a gathering of friends, in the good, old-fashioned, broad sense of that term; not the slightest stiffness of manner, our ladies dressed in beautiful taste, with pleasant faces and jolly greetings, the scene was one to be remembered with the utmost pleasure. Our visiting friends were almost in ecstasies over the affair, and they, as well as our own good people who were present, just went in for what they universally acknowledged they had enjoyed, one of the best social occasions of their lives. Promptly at 12 o'clock tattoo was sounded, and bidding our guests a most friendly farewell, our Brainerd ladies and gentlemen retired to their homes, while the visiting friends retired to the palatial rooms of the Headquarters Hotel to enjoy a few hours sleep preparatory to pursuing their journey homeward on the morning train bound eastward.
There’s no use in talking, Weed is a brick; and our people know how, and stand ready to do the nice thing by visitors from abroad on the shortest notice and at any time. Brainerd beats ‘em all, and if we didn’t know it, we shouldn’t say so. (Brainerd Tribune, 12 December 1874, p. 1, c. 2)

10 December
THE pay-car started west Thursday morning, in charge of Mr. J. W. Edgerton, to replenish the pockets of all employees west of us, to Fargo. (Brainerd Tribune, 12 December 1874, p. 1, c. 7)

12 December
CHANGE OF OFFICERS.—We learn that a change has occurred among the General officers of the Northern Pacific Railroad, located here. Mr. Pritchard, the Treasurer of the Company, who has heretofore had his office in New York, will remove to Brainerd, and merge the office of Treasurer and Assistant Treasurer (the latter having up to now been filled by Col. R. M. Newport, here) into one, and take charge thereof himself in person. Col. Newport will hereafter fill the Auditor’s chair in place of L. W. Ford, Esq., resigned.
We understand that Mr. Ford will return to New York again, where he will fill a prominent position. Mr. Ford is a most accomplished accountant, and a clever gentleman in every way, and we regret that he, with his excellent family, is to leave our young community, of which both he and his good wife had become highly esteemed and valued members. May success attend Mr. Ford wherever he may be, is the wish of his many warm friends and admirers in Brainerd. (Brainerd Tribune, 12 December 1874, p. 1, c. 6)

SEE: 17 August 1872
SEE: 26 April 1873
SEE: 19 December 1874
SEE: 09 October 1875
SEE: 29 January 1876
SEE: 19 February 1876
SEE: 03 June 1876
SEE: 25 April 1877
SEE: 06 June 1877
SEE: 09 June 1877
SEE: 14 June 1877
SEE: 06 October 1877
SEE: 07 February 1880
SEE: 17 February 1881
SEE: 26 February 1881
SEE: 17 March 1881
SEE: 09 April 1881
SEE: 13 April 1881
SEE: 30 April 1881
SEE: 19 May 1881
SEE: 23 July 1881
SEE: 11 February 1882
SEE: 18 February 1882
SEE: 30 July 1882
SEE: 05 February 1917

GONE TO TEXAS.—Quite a number of the railroad men at the Machine Shops have left for Palestine, Texas, within a short time, and among the number Mr. Thos. Bason, the tinner and brass founder, who has upon many occasions entertained our people in the literary society, exhibiting on all occasions a brilliancy of talent and profundity of knowledge which is rarely possessed by men of any walk in life these days. They go to Texas to become connected with railroad operations there in similar positions they occupied here. Success to them. (Brainerd Tribune, 12 December 1874, p. 1, c. 7)

19 December

DOUBTFUL.


A Washington correspondent is responsible for the statement that the friends of the Northern Pacific have become discouraged and are leaving Washington—having given up all hope of securing aid by Congressional action. He also says that the prospects for the Southern Pacific are good and still brightening; that besides the solid Southern support, it has Pennsylvania secured in its behalf, as well as several other powerful knots of friends, all of whom are dead set against the Northern Pacific Railroad—now that they think they can handle their own measure without the aid of the N. P. influence. This may all be true, but we are not yet convinced thereof; we don’t believe that the Southern Pacific can afford to go back on the Northern Pacific, but that both enterprises will go before Congress, the one leaning upon the other for support and that they will either stand or fall together. (Brainerd Tribune, 19 December 1874, p. 1, c. 5)

AN ERROR CORRECTED.—In noticing the changes in some of the Railroad officers here last week, we made an error, through the rush of getting to press, mixed with a little carelessness. Mr. Pritchard, the Treasurer of the Company, will not come to Brainerd, but will remain in New York as heretofore; though, so far as the operating of the Road concerns that office it will be at Brainerd, and in the charge of Col. R. M. Newport, as usual, who is under the new arrangement made both Auditor and Assistant Treasurer of the Company.
We also learn that the General Ticket Office has been merged with the General Freight Department, and hereafter both departments will be under charge of W. S. Alexander, Esq., as General Freight and Ticket Agent, with headquarters at Saint Paul. (Brainerd Tribune, 19 December 1874, p. 1, c. 6)

SEE: 17 August 1872
SEE: 26 April 1873
SEE: 12 December 1874
SEE: 09 October 1875
SEE: 29 January 1876
SEE: 19 February 1876
SEE: 03 June 1876
SEE: 25 April 1877
SEE: 06 June 1877
SEE: 09 June 1877
SEE: 14 June 1877
SEE: 06 October 1877
SEE: 07 February 1880
SEE: 17 February 1881
SEE: 26 February 1881
SEE: 17 March 1881
SEE: 09 April 1881
SEE: 13 April 1881
SEE: 30 April 1881
SEE: 19 May 1881
SEE: 23 July 1881
SEE: 11 February 1882
SEE: 18 February 1882
SEE: 30 July 1882
SEE: 05 February 1917

25 December
CHRISTMAS PARTY.—Mr. E. W. Weed, the jolly landlord of the Headquarters Hotel, gave a party to our citizens last evening, and it was one of Brainerd’s best, which embraces all the good things we could say about it, if we wrote adjectives for a week. Ben Hazen furnished music, and a hundred happy dancers tripped the hours away in happy mood and social enjoyment. Long live Weed—one of the live and liberal men of the Line. (Brainerd Tribune, 26 December 1874, p. 1, c. 7)

1875
02 January
Mr. J. G. Pinkerton is now in charge of the telegraph office here, as Train Dispatcher, in place of C. M. Green, who has gone to Decorah, Iowa. Mr. Pinkerton is said to be an accomplished man in his profession, and a gentleman universally esteemed by all who have the pleasure of his acquaintance. (Brainerd Tribune, 02 January 1875, p. 1, c. 6)


SEE: 29 June 1875
SEE: 27 July 1875
SEE: 08 August 1875
SEE: 28 August 1875


A Presentation.


The evening previous to the departure of C. M. Green, Esq., (late Train Dispatcher here), to go to Decorah for the purpose of commencing the study of the law, his friends and railroad associates presented him with a handsome gold watch. We did not have the pleasure of being present, but learn that it was a happy affair, and a complete surprise to friend “Clem.” We met him in St. Paul the day after, and we can assure his friends here that he was proud of his present. The gift made was most worthily bestowed, and will ever be fondly appreciated by Mr. Green. (Brainerd Dispatch, 02 January 1875, p. 1, c. 6)

13 January
MAJ. GEO. H. SMITH, who has for a year past been Acting Superintendent of the L. S. & M. Railroad, has recently been promoted to General Superintendent, and the entire operating department put under his care. We always knew it would be so, ‘cause you know they have quit making any better men than Maj. Smith for any position. (Brainerd Tribune, 16 January 1875, p. 1, c. 6)

23 January
SOCIAL DANCES.—Matters have now been arranged whereby a series of social dances will be given at Headquarters [Hotel] under the management of Mr. Weed during the season. They will be given every Friday evening. Ben Hazen’s splendid band will furnish the music, which will render this important item of such affairs a proud success. (Brainerd Tribune, 23 January 1875, p. 1, c. 7)

WHAT WE SHALL DO.


Everybody, and all his relatives, in this town and along the line of the Northern Pacific, are holding their breath, fairly, waiting as patiently as possible to see what Congress is going to do about assisting the onward march of the Northern Pacific Railroad toward the Pacific, and also what our Legislature is going to do toward forcing the completion of the branches—the Brainerd and St. Vincent. If both, or either, of the propositions are successful, there will be joy and merry-making lying around loose all over this northern country. We are not certain as to what we shall do, for instance, when the good news comes—if it comes. We feel sure there will be fun, for awhile, all around wherever we are located, however. We shall come as near turning four double somersaults as we ever did, even if we don’t light on our feet—it won’t matter how we light, for we can stand it under the circumstances. We shall gallop down town and get an awful big—pound or two of nails, and just assure the boys that it’s all right, and not excelled by anything short of the 17th of March or 4th of July. We’ll advise Uncle White to raise the price of lots fifty per cent, and chalk us out a dozen corner’s and bring in his bill. The thing will be literally gorgeous, you know. We propose to get five or six tie contracts, and the job of building the Missouri River bridge, and sublet them to our brothers-in-law, while we put up a brownstone front on the TRIBUNE office, then raise the d—l and sell newspapers. We shall also have the Brainerd soap-mine opened up, and develop our interest in the Watab gold diggings, build four watering places for the accommodation of the thousands of visitors—and they’ll be hotels as are hotels, too; the Grand Pacific, of Chicago, wouldn’t make a respectable dog kennel to any of them. The machine shops shall be enlarged eight times,—employing fifteen thousand men,—the Townsite Company will turn Gregory Park into an aquarium with a mammoth fountain in the center, with a whale, and rhinoceros, and a hippopotamus, as the big attractions, we shall have a brass band with silver instruments, and a hundred of them, to play perpetually, we shall see that a park is fixed off, for the pleasure of our citizens, in which Central Park couldn’t be found except with a microscope, and we shall see to it immediately that proceedings shall at once be instituted to commence, or rather to inaugurate the original beginning of the initial superstructure of the foundation that will be made to support the lower part of what will be one of the—well, yes, of course we shall; because who will care for expense, no how, and—and—you know if everybody else will do as much, won’t Brainerd be some, though? You are just whistling! (Brainerd Tribune, Morris C. Russell, Editor, 23 January 1875, p. 4, c. 1)

30 January

DEFEAT OF THE NORTHERN PACIFIC BILL.


A special to the St. Paul papers the other day announced that the Congressional Railroad Committee had reported adversely on the Northern Pacific bill, asking a guarantee of the interest on its bonds, which, if true, would doubtless cook the Northern Pacific goose for the present, and such a result has not been entirely unlooked for. Yet, outside of this “special” rumor we have at this writing heard nothing more from it, and there is a possibility that the rumor is false—at any rate, so far as its being tee-totally fatal is concerned—and hence we wait further particulars before concluding to annihilate the committee. But if it has done as reported, the doom of the members thereof is sealed just as soon as we get around to their case. (Brainerd Tribune, 30 January 1875, p. 1, c. 3)

CALLED.—Mr. Fitzpatrick, Road Master of the Dakota Division, called upon us the other day. Mr. F. is just recovering from the lively old squeeze he got in the fall, between an engine and a caboose—which same squeeze compressed his body into a space of seven inches, and he is an uncommonly large man, too. This is probably the smallest amount of territory ever occupied by any man, that ever lived afterward to tell the tale. Mr. Ftizpatrick has been spending a week or two with mine host Weed, of the Headquarters [Hotel]. (Brainerd Tribune, 30 January 1875, p. 1, c. 5)

SEE: 16 June 1875

06 February
RAILROAD employees are paid punctually at the end of every month. Our friend, J. W. Edgerton, does it with his little car. (Brainerd Tribune, 06 February 1875, p. 1, c. 5)

A GREAT quantity of letters are being received at the Northern Pacific Land Department headquarters here, from all over the country, relative to the obtaining of the rich acres in the Northern Pacific country. Mr. Power’s department will doubtless be over-run with business as soon as spring opens. (Brainerd Tribune, 06 February 1875, p. 1, c. 6)

SEE: 05 October 1871
SEE: 01 April 1873
SEE: 03 May 1873
SEE: 01 December 1873
SEE: 27 December 1873
SEE: 10 January 1874
SEE: 06 June 1874
SEE: 12 September 1874
SEE: 28 November 1874
SEE: 20 March 1875
SEE: 12 April 1875
SEE: 07 August 1875
SEE: 09 October 1875
SEE: 19 February 1876
SEE: 22 July 1876
SEE: 07 October 1876
SEE: 25 April 1877
SEE: 14 June 1877
SEE: 04 August 1877
SEE: 06 October 1877
SEE: 23 October 1877
SEE: 02 November 1877
SEE: 18 June 1878
SEE: 20 July 1878
SEE: 06 August 1878
SEE: 21 September 1878
SEE: 28 September 1878
SEE: 10 May 1879
SEE: 05 July 1879
SEE: 30 July 1879
SEE: 27 September 1879
SEE: 18 February 1880
SEE: 21 February 1880
SEE: 28 August 1880
SEE: 31 August 1880
SEE: 04 September 1880
SEE: 16 September 1880
SEE: 09 October 1880
SEE: 09 December 1880
SEE: 25 December 1880
SEE: 17 February 1881
SEE: 21 February 1881
SEE: 26 February 1881
SEE: 09 April 1881
SEE: 13 April 1881
SEE: 23 April 1881
SEE: 19 May 1881
SEE: 11 June 1881
SEE: 23 July 1881
SEE: 01 September 1881
SEE: 03 October 1881
SEE: 06 December 1881
SEE: 30 July 1882
SEE: 02 August 1882
SEE: 05 February 1917

10 February
CALLED.—General Manager C. W. Mead spent Wednesday in the “City of the Pines,” and, with Superintendent Sullivan favored our “Brown-stone front” with a friendly call, illuminating our sanctum and cheering the whole establishment from rudder to jackstaff with their encouraging manner. Call again, gentlemen; every inch of the slack of our latch string is always at your disposal. (Brainerd Tribune, 13 February 1875, p. 1, c. 6)

13 February
THE most artistic painters and sign-writers west of Chicago are the gentlemen who swing the brush in the Northern Pacific paint shop at Brainerd. (Brainerd Tribune, 13 February 1875, p. 1, c. 6)

20 February

THE “BRANCHES.”


We are pleased to note the activity of the Legislative Railroad Committee in reference to the much needed branches of the St. Paul & Pacific Railroad.
The Joint Committee held an animated meeting a few nights ago, and took the male bovine by the antlers with a vigor that seemed to bode no good to the bull. The condition of these branch lines is briefly, yet exactly this, as we understand it: The Government granted an extension of two years’ time for their completion, which time expires a year from next month. The conditions were, that the first year of this time was to be held open and at the disposal of the bondholders; they to have that time in which to decide whether they wished to complete the lines and secure to themselves the land grant or not; at the end of a year, if the bondholders did not commence the construction, with a guarantee to promptly complete them, then the grant was to fall to the State, to be disposed of by the State in like manner to any party who would go on and complete the work during the second and last year of the time; if the State failed, as a sort of agent, to build the roads during the second year, then the land should again revert to the Government, and the game of “Branch” would be effectually and permanently “up.” The bondholders have failed to turn a hand in the matter, and the liberal time given them has expired. They claim that they have been swindled in the large investments they have already made in the St. Paul & Pacific, and this is the reason they dare not invest any further— they “had rather lose what they have already invested than to run the chance of losing more.” No doubt, through an unpardonably loose manner of doing business, and by means of rascally agents, they have been outrageously swindled by private individuals. But that the State or Government is under the slightest obligation to the bondholders, or that either is in any manner responsible for their misfortunes—especially the State—is not conceded, by a long shot; and this is the view taken by a majority of the committee, as a matter of course. The bondholders’ agent is baying at the heels of the committee, endeavoring to make out that by the State stepping into their now empty shoes and causing the prompt construction of the roads on behalf of the people who are suffering so sorely because of their non-completion, a glaring wrong is about to be wrought upon them. They might with more consistency hold the man in the moon responsible for their losses than the State of Minnesota, because he may have lent his countenance to the plottings that caused their overthrow, but the State or its agents—never.
We doubt not the Committee will recommend emphatically that the State, through its chief executive, sees that the people, and the promising portions of the State directly interested, now have long delayed justice done them, by the completion of the Brainerd and the Pembina Branches the coming summer—ere the extension of time again runs out, not again to be renewed, in all probability. (Brainerd Tribune, 20 February 1875, p. 1, c. 3)

27 February
ALL the world knows there was, “jobs” perpetrated by contractors, etc., in the early history of the Northern Pacific Railroad (as there has been in every great public enterprise since Adam was a yearling). Who says there wasn’t? But who can say that for the past year or two the Northern Pacific has not been the best managed railroad in the west, and that—from the highest to the lowest—the officers of the Company are not doing their level best for the interests of all concerned? Say something, Doctor! (Brainerd Tribune, 27 February 1875, p. 1, c. 7)

10 March
A CAR in Wednesday evening’s train from the east took fire when within about six miles from Brainerd, and burned up, with its contents. It contained several bails of oakum, and it is thought a spark from the engine drifted into some little opening and ignited the oakum. Loss not very heavy. (Brainerd Tribune, 13 March 1875, p. 1, c. 6)

13 March

Opening the Dakota Division.


Superintendent Sullivan, with a crew of men, will commence the opening of the Dakota Division the coming week. It is thought that but little difficulty will be experienced, as the winter in the Northern Pacific country has been a very harmless affair—quite the reverse of the country below us. The Dakota Division once open, business and travel will again begin to flow to and from the frontier posts. (Brainerd Tribune, 13 March 1875, p. 1, c. 5)

20 March
MR. J. B. POWER, Land Commissioner, N. P. R. R., who has been in New York for several weeks, on business connected with his department, has again returned home. (Brainerd Tribune, 20 March 1875, p. 1, c. 5)

POWER:
SEE: 05 October 1871
SEE: 01 April 1873
SEE: 03 May 1873

SEE: 01 December 1873
SEE: 27 December 1873
SEE: 10 January 1874
SEE: 06 June 1874
SEE: 12 September 1874
SEE: 28 November 1874
SEE: 06 February 1875
SEE: 12 April 1875
SEE: 07 August 1875
SEE: 09 October 1875
SEE: 19 February 1876
SEE: 22 July 1876
SEE: 07 October 1876
SEE: 25 April 1877
SEE: 14 June 1877
SEE: 04 August 1877
SEE: 06 October 1877
SEE: 23 October 1877
SEE: 02 November 1877
SEE: 18 June 1878
SEE: 20 July 1878
SEE: 06 August 1878
SEE: 21 September 1878
SEE: 28 September 1878
SEE: 10 May 1879
SEE: 05 July 1879
SEE: 30 July 1879
SEE: 27 September 1879
SEE: 18 February 1880
SEE: 21 February 1880
SEE: 28 August 1880
SEE: 31 August 1880
SEE: 04 September 1880
SEE: 16 September 1880
SEE: 09 October 1880
SEE: 09 December 1880
SEE: 25 December 1880
SEE: 17 February 1881
SEE: 21 February 1881
SEE: 26 February 1881
SEE: 09 April 1881
SEE: 13 April 1881
SEE: 23 April 1881
SEE: 19 May 1881
SEE: 11 June 1881
SEE: 23 July 1881
SEE: 01 September 1881
SEE: 03 October 1881
SEE: 06 December 1881
SEE: 30 July 1882
SEE: 02 August 1882
SEE: 05 February 1917

27 March

PERSONAL MENTION.


Friend W. H. Lewis, Esq., Master Machinist N. P. R. R., returned home a few days ago from a visit to his old home in Brookfield, Missouri....

We were glad to welcome home, the other evening, our former fellow citizens, Mr. Thomas Bason, who went to Texas last fall and spent the winter in that State. Mr. B. is the brass founder and tinner in the N. P. shops here, and expresses himself as greatly delighted to get back once more to our beautiful “City of the Pines,” which he does not care to leave again in a hurry. He thinks the Northern Pacific country eminently preferable to Texas as a place to reside, particularly on account of its peculiarly healthful, social and educational advantages, and he says all the northern men he met in Texas would come north again as soon as they could, or at least, when they desire to locate permanently. The longer we live, the more anxious we become to put this Northern Pacific region up against any other patch of territory on the face of the earth, for a good, square, comfortable country in which to live, move and rotate. (Brainerd Tribune, 27 March 1875, p. 1, c. 7)

THE NORTHERN PACIFIC RAILROAD.


The recent meeting of the bondholders of the Northern Pacific Railroad in New York was a large one, several millions of dollars being represented from all parts of the United States, and we are told by the New York Tribune, that the meeting was remarkably harmonious, a general feeling of confidence being manifested in the merits of the enterprise, and in the value of the property. An equally strong feeling of confidence was expressed by those present in the integrity and ability of the management, and there was a strong desire shown throughout the session to put the road through at the earliest possible opportunity.
Hon. L. D. M. Sweet, of Maine, presided, on the motion of Mr. George W. Cass, the President. Mr. Cass’ address to the bondholders was the most important feature of the meeting. He set forth the advantages of the route and the value of the property in a way that would seem to have inspired a sanguine confidence in the success of the enterprise. He cited the Union Pacific Railroad as a measure of comparison, and stated that the Northern Pacific road would be better than the Union Pacific road, on account of having lower grades, straighter line, better lands, more and richer minerals, more and better coal, vastly more timber, better climate, less snow, better agricultural and pastoral soil, more water, and a greater supply of stone for building. (Brainerd Tribune, 27 March 1875, p. 1, c. 7)

THE OPENING.


We are informed that Superintendent Sullivan will commence the work of opening the Dakota Division on Tuesday next. The recent storm, which was of unheard of severity, will have rendered the opening of that division very tedious, comparatively, and it will tax the well known energy of Mr. Sullivan, and his noble assistants, to the utmost; though we feel sure the work will be performed in the shortest possible time, for the N. P. boys, though they have had less experience than the operators of some of the continually snow-bound roads three or four hundred miles south of us, are a perfect terror to a snow bank, and a crew of men, under such competent corps of directors, mostly go through a cut filled with snow like a dose of epsom salts. (Brainerd Tribune, 27 March 1875, p. 1, c. 7)

01 April
THE family of Mr. H. A. Towne, Supt. of Machinery, N. P. R. R., arrived in Brainerd on Thursday evening’s train, and will take up a residence among us. The family party was composed of Mr. and Mrs. Towne and little son, and Mrs. and Miss Scoville, mother and sister of Mrs. Towne. Our good people welcome the “new comers” heartily, and wish they may find their residence in the “City of the Pines” a pleasant one. (Brainerd Tribune, 03 April 1875, p. 1, c. 5)

12 April

A FAREWELL INCIDENT.


John Davidson, so long and favorably known on the Northern Pacific Railroad, for a time, as Cashier and Paymaster, but for the past year as chief accountant in the office of the Land Department in this city, has been advanced to the more prominent position of agent, in charge of the company’s interest at Bismarck, and left Monday evening with General [Manager] Mead to enter upon the duties of his new position. We have learned of a little incident worthy of mention, as showing the kindly feeling existing between himself and the employees of the Land Department. The gentlemen of the office were passing an evening with Mr. Davidson—in fact a farewell gathering—and at its close, as they were preparing to leave, Mr. Power, the General Agent of the Department, stepping up to him, says:
“Mr. Davidson, it has become a fixed rule in our Department to make to any of its employees who, for any cause have to leave, a little speech; this duty has been delegated to me. I am not a speaker and therefore will hand you this token of remembrance, which in better language than mine tells you of pleasant associations, kindly feelings, regret that you are to leave us, at the same time carrying with it congratulations for advancement and the best of wishes for your future prosperity and happiness, knowing that in days to come the memory of friendship formed by our pleasant connections, will abide forever, wherever or whatever our future may be.”
Mr. Davidson was taken completely by surprise, but replied by saying:
“This is certainly an unexpected pleasure, and as proof that there is or ever was aught but the best of good fellowship among us, ‘entirely unnecessary.’ The uniform courtesy and kindness that is a marked and pleasing feature among all who have any connections with the gentlemen of the Land Department, has day by day expressed your true feelings more plainly than could possibly be expressed in any other way. I accept your gift, thank you for it, and shall cherish it. I can but add that it is with regret that I leave you, knowing that no position can be more pleasant, or more congenial to my feelings and tastes; wishing also to say, that my connection with your office has been a valuable one to me, not only on account of forming the acquaintance and acquiring the friendship of true men, but also in learning to a degree never before fully appreciated, the advantage of a complete, simple, and yet comprehensive system; for I never was before connected with an office where such an amount of labor—much of it very intricate and complicated—is done by as few, and in such harmony of action as in that of the Land Department here. Wherever my future lot may be, my year with the Land Department of the N. P. R. R. Co. will always be remembered as one of the green spots of my life.”
The token of remembrance was a beautiful pipe, and as known, our friend Davidson will never let the fires of friendship go out, or the ashes of kindly feeling toward the donors grow cold. (Brainerd Tribune, 17 April 1875, p. 1, c. 3)

POWER:
SEE: 05 October 1871
SEE: 01 April 1873
SEE: 03 May 1873

SEE: 01 December 1873
SEE: 27 December 1873
SEE: 10 January 1874
SEE: 06 June 1874
SEE: 12 September 1874
SEE: 28 November 1874
SEE: 06 February 1875
SEE: 20 March 1875
SEE: 07 August 1875
SEE: 09 October 1875
SEE: 19 February 1876
SEE: 22 July 1876
SEE: 07 October 1876
SEE: 25 April 1877
SEE: 14 June 1877
SEE: 04 August 1877
SEE: 06 October 1877
SEE: 23 October 1877
SEE: 02 November 1877
SEE: 18 June 1878
SEE: 20 July 1878
SEE: 06 August 1878
SEE: 21 September 1878
SEE: 28 September 1878
SEE: 10 May 1879
SEE: 05 July 1879
SEE: 30 July 1879
SEE: 27 September 1879
SEE: 18 February 1880
SEE: 21 February 1880
SEE: 28 August 1880
SEE: 31 August 1880
SEE: 04 September 1880
SEE: 16 September 1880
SEE: 09 October 1880
SEE: 09 December 1880
SEE: 25 December 1880
SEE: 17 February 1881
SEE: 21 February 1881
SEE: 26 February 1881
SEE: 09 April 1881
SEE: 13 April 1881
SEE: 23 April 1881
SEE: 19 May 1881
SEE: 11 June 1881
SEE: 23 July 1881
SEE: 01 September 1881
SEE: 03 October 1881
SEE: 06 December 1881
SEE: 30 July 1882
SEE: 02 August 1882
SEE: 05 February 1917

GENERAL MANAGER MEAD, and party, passed through Brainerd on Monday night last, bound west to Bismarck. The opening of the Dakota Division has progressed rapidly and satisfactorily, when considering the unheard of severity of the recent storm which prevailed all over the Northwest. Mr. Mead speaks in the most encouraging terms of the business prospects of the road this year. It will nearly double its last year’s business, and even last year the road “paid big.” Let the good times come; we can all stand it. (Brainerd Tribune, 17 April 1875, p. 1, c. 5)

16 April

THROUGH TO BISMARCK.


The Dakota Division is open! The train arrived at Bismarck at five o’clock yesterday evening, and was received amid the cheers of the populace. Trains will commence running from Fargo to Bismarck on Monday morning next, the 19th inst., and run regularly thereafter. (Brainerd Tribune, 17 April 1875, p. 1, c. 7)

17 April
MIKE SMITH, the irrepressible Northern Pacific nursery man, has got back to Brainerd again, and will forthwith proceed to fence and plant out to hardwood trees the fine square of ground in front of the Headquarters; after which he will hie himself to Goose Creek Nursery, out beyond Fargo. (Brainerd Tribune, 17 April 1875, p. 1, c. 5)

PAID OFF.—Capt. J. W. Edgerton made his usual monthly trip along the line this week, and “gave to each laborer his hive,” making all the sturdy and noble men who assist in operating this great continental railway, correspondingly happy. The Northern Pacific is the only road in these parts that always pays its employees punctually at the end of each month. (Brainerd Tribune, 17 April 1875, p. 1, c. 6)

FREIGHTS.


The Northern Pacific Railroad Company will carry freight this season at the following rates, as we are informed:
From St. Paul to Bismarck, 75c. per hundred, for Montana freight.
All first-class freight from St. Paul to Fort Garry, $2.00 per hundred.
This is a very large reduction from the rates of any previous season. (Brainerd Tribune, 17 April 1875, p. 1, c. 7)

19 April

ANOTHER SURPRISE.


Mr. C. W. Mead, general manager of the Northern Pacific road for G. W. Cass, the receiver, on Monday last took possession of the road, and all the property, rights and franchises of the company, connected therewith, in Minnnesota and Dakota, for and in the name of George W. Cass, receiver appointed by the United States court. From this time forward all accounts will be kept in the name of the receiver. No change has been made in the management and business of the road; and the same will be conducted as heretofore, until further orders.
This must be the age of surprising events. No one was prepared in his mind for this “new deal” in Northern Pacific affairs, but there is probably no one on the line of the road—nor elsewhere, for that matter,—but what exclaims amen! That is, we have all been ripe, for months past, for something to turn up that would look to an advance in the progress of this great thoroughfare, and it is universally conceded that this move means “business.” And further, all who have had any opportunity to know, and who are immediately interested—such as the thousands of settlers along the line—are most profoundly grateful to be assured that the local management of the affairs of the Northern Pacific is not to be changed. Mr. C. W. Mead, and his corps of subordinates, in the opinion of us people of the Northern Pacific country, stand pre-eminent as noble men and gentlemen, and as men who know their business, and do it in a business way, and have a just appreciation of the needs and rights of the settlers; and with such men in control, the Northern Pacific has on its line thousands of men who stand ready, night or day, to defend its good name and sustain the great enterprise by their good words, deeds, and complete endorsement. With the management now in charge, we defy the production of a single parallel in the whole history of the civilized world where a people will so stand by a corporation, or have such a feeling in favor of a public enterprise, as have the people (directly interested) of this whole section for the Northern Pacific and its immediate conductors. Strike a blow at our home managers, or say a word against the Northern Pacific, and you strike the finest feelings of twenty thousand people who live right on the line. (Brainerd Tribune, 24 April 1875, p. 1, c. 3)

24 April
THE PARK.—By the energy, particularly of Mr. Eber H. Bly, our public park has been placed in competent hands, and is already being improved, and the work will be shoved to a speedy completion. Verily, it will be a grand addition to our beautiful city, and verily the enterprise and liberality of our people knoweth no bounds. (Brainerd Tribune, 24 April 1875, p. 1, c. 5)

01 May

FULL OF STRANGERS.


These days remind one of the ancient days in the history of our not very ancient city. The trains from each way stop over night here, and although we posses quite extensive hotel accommodations, yet the travel is becoming so great on the road that our hotel folks have been compelled to commence “hanging ‘em up on a nail”—the rooms being clean gone at an early hour each evening. Friend Weed, of the popular “Headquarters,” with his able assistants, Messrs. Low and Hicks, can stow away a good many people, in as fine quarters as the Northwest affords; but he says there’s just one of two things got to be done: either the people must stay at home and quit traveling so much over the popular Northern Pacific, or else he shall have to run his hotel up five or six stories higher or enlarge it on the ground a block or two. As for ourself, “we repeat it, let ‘em come.” (Brainerd Tribune, 01 May 1875, p. 1, c. 3)

THE Headquarters Hotel has now attached one of the prettiest billiard halls in this section of country. The rooms have been beautifully fitted up, painted, frescoed and tinted, and all guests hereafter who are fond of this interesting game can find the finest of tables at their disposal. (Brainerd Tribune, 01 May 1875, p. 1, c. 7)

THE NORTHERN PACIFIC.


The work of the recent meeting of directors of the Northern Pacific Railroad Company, at which General Cass’s resignation as president was presented and accepted, consisted principally of an investigation of the liabilities and assets as furnished by the Company’s report. By these it appears that the assets consist of 550 miles of finished road and over 10,000,000 acres of land, on which the liabilities are mortgaged bonds to the amount of $30,000,000, stock to the amount of $25,000,000, which was distributed as a premium to the bonds, and a floating debt of less than $700,000; of which $500,000 is due to the directors of the road. Besides this, there is $2,500,000 of back interest due, which is unclassified and which will probably be relinquished by the bondholders in their settlement of the present difficulty. After the examination of their report, the committee discussed with the company’s officers the financial difficulties of the road, and the best way out of them. Three plans were prominent among the many proposed. First, to form an association of bondholders that might be strong enough to foreclose the mortgage and buy in the road; second, for the bondholders to exchange their bonds for preferred stock, leaving the completed road clear of debt as the basis of a new series of loans, and then later to effect a second exchange of bonds for the stock if desired; third, to hold the road built and lands earned as sole security for the bonds now out, to divide the road to be constructed into sections of twenty-five miles, and to make an issue of bonds for each section, to be secured by that particular section, and the lands earned through it. No decisive action has as yet been taken. (Brainerd Tribune, 01 May 1875, p. 4, c. 1)

08 May
CITY PARK.—Under the skillful management of the invincible Mike Smith, the Northern Pacific tree planter. Our Park is fast approaching in appearance a real city park. When Mike has his trees all planted, and the fence is completed, it only remains for nature to perform her part of the business to make this an ornament to the city, commanding the admiration of every passer-by, and feeding the pride of every citizen of Brainerd. (Brainerd Tribune, 08 May 1875, p. 1, c. 5)

12 May
The General Manager Mead, Directors, and various other notables of the N. P. R. R., were in the city Wednesday night en route for Bismarck, where a heavy land suit, in which the N. P. is interested, is to be tried on the 17th inst. (Brainerd Tribune, 15 May 1875, p. 1, c. 5)

14 May

THE NORTHERN PACIFIC.
_____

The Road and Its Equipments and
All Its Vast Empire of Lands to
be Sold.


New York Sun 14.
Judge Shipman has made a decree in the foreclosure suit against the Northern Pacific Railroad that will undoubtedly result in the liquidation of the affairs of that insolvent corporation, if adverse litigation does not interfere. The initial pleading on which the suit is founded is pro forma styled Jay Cooke, et al. against The Northern Pacific Railroad Company. Jay Cooke being hopelessly bankrupt, can have no legitimate individual interest in the suit. He is a necessary party to it, because he and J. Edgar Thompson, late president of the Pennsylvania railroad company, were named in the first mortgage of the Northern Pacific railroad company as trustees for the purchasers of the bonds attempted to be secured by that mortgage. Mr. Thompson is dead. Under the provisions of the original instrument for a succession of trustees, Mr. Charlemagne Tower takes Mr. Thompson’s place. Other necessary parties plaintiff are named, for reasons that do not appear in the decree.
The orders of the decree, which is very elaborately drawn, are substantially as follows: The road bed, bridges, superstructure, station houses, water tanks, sidings, switchings, rights of way, easements, rolling stock, and, in short, every material thing pertaining to the completed portion of the railroad, which is now nearly five hundred miles long, is to be sold in front of the custom house in this city, after advertisement in a prescribed manner for sixty days. The sale is to be conducted under the supervision of Kenneth G. White, clerk of the court, and U. S. Marshall, Oliver Fiske, the former of whom is termed “Master Commissioner,” and upon whom devolves large discretion as to postponements, advertising, and reporting the sale finally effected to the court for confirmation.
The immense land grant of the road is not to be included or effected in any way by this sale of the railroad. The decree provides that Messrs. White and Fiske shall sell the lands, after due advertisement, in the states and territories in which they lie, in tracts not exceeding a section, (640 acres) and that may be any ordinary subdivision of a section, such for instance, as the quarter of a quarter of a section (40 acres). Under this arrangement it is estimated that it will be at least five years before the sales of the lands are completed by Messrs. White and Fiske and their sales finally confirmed. In the mean time the property is to be in the possession of the Hon. Geo. W. Cass, president of the railroad, who has by another recent decree of the court been appointed receiver, and upon whom, by virtue of that decree, all the powers, privileges, and functions of the corporation are devolved. He is also ordered to join in the proper execution of this later decree. There is a further provision that Messrs. Cooke and Tower, the trustees, may bid for and purchase any of the property, in behalf of all the holders secured by the mortgage, in the proportion of the respective interests of the holders. Just what this means it is hard to tell, but it looks like a quiet method of turning road, franchises, lands and everything over to such large bondholders as may be willing to arrange with Jay Cooke and his co-trustees. (Brainerd Tribune, 22 May 1875, p. 1, c. 3)

15 May
NEW TIME TABLE.—On Monday next trains on the Northern Pacific commence running on the new time table, which in our opinion is the best arrangement ever inaugurated on the line. Trains will run through to St. Paul from here in the night, with sleepers attached, and without changing cars at the Junction, as heretofore. This arrangement rather ignores Duluth; but, then, the interests of Duluth are only trivial compared with those of Brainerd, any how. Don’t it, Russell? But, then, Russell, we will run a daily accommodation train to your little burgh, which will answer all your actual requirements if it don’t entirely fill the bill with your pride. (Brainerd Tribune, 15 May 1875, p. 1, c. 4)

22 May
THE NORTHERN PACIFIC.—The travel and freight business on the Northern Pacific this season is immense. The passenger trains are crowded both ways, and the increased freights are scarcely able to keep their docks clear. As high as four hundred passengers have gone through here in one day. If the road continues thus for the season, it will tend to help them out of their financial difficulties. (Brainerd Tribune, 22 May 1875, p. 1, c. 6)

26 May

Personal.


Mike Smith, the tree planter, of Goose Creek, D. T., gave us a call on Wednesday. He had with him some pie plant, cut on the 24th of this month in his garden at Goose Creek, from a root planted on the 27th of April last, measuring twenty-two and one-half inches in length, which averages nearly an inch per day. He has already planted fifty acres of trees this spring, all doing well excepting those in our park, many of which he thinks will die if nothing is done for them, as the ground is too dry and the heat too great. If they were worth planting they are worth taking care of, and a little mulching around the roots of each will not only preserve them from death but will cause them to grow one hundred per cent better than they otherwise would with the most favorable weather. (Brainerd Tribune, 29 May 1875, p. 1, c. 4)

29 May
Vice President Wright, Gen’l. Manager Mead, Attorney Grey, and several of the Directors and other notables of the Northern Pacific passed east through Brainerd this week. At Moorhead they held a council with the citizens regarding the objections of that town to the Road, and heard speeches from Messrs. Nickles, of the Star; and Finkle, of Burns & Finkle. Nickles raised to give his views of the matter, and Finkle requested him to keep his seat for the reason stated that the citizens of Moorhead did not in any degree sanction the opinions or statements of the Star or its editor.
The R. R. party made an excursion to White Earth from Detroit [Lakes] on Tuesday, to see the country. (Brainerd Tribune, 29 May 1875, p. 1, c. 6)

Mr. Bryant, of the firm of Shoenberger & Bryant, of Duluth, whose Iron Foundry was burned last week at that place, has removed to Brainerd, and will open an Iron Foundry in connection with the N. P. Machine Shops here. (Brainerd Tribune, 29 May 1875, p. 1, c. 6)

31 May
Gen’l. [Manager] C. W. Mead was in the city Monday. He is very sanguine regarding the future prospects of the Northern Pacific since the change. May his expectations be more than realized. (Brainerd Tribune, 05 June 1875, p. 1, c. 6)

05 June
TO-MORROW the time on the Northern Pacific changes to accommodate the Lake Superior travel. Trains will run to Duluth and there connect with the Lake Superior & Mississippi road, instead of at the Junction, and meet at Brainerd at noon. A night Express will run on the L. S. & M. to connect. We have not seen the time card and cannot give the figures. (Brainerd Tribune, 05 June 1875, p. 1, c. 4)

16 June

Sad Accident.


The Westward bound train on the Northern Pacific met with a serious accident Wednesday on the Dakota Division, about three miles west of the 13th Siding. The very heavy rain the day previous had washed away the track at this place, which was not discovered until too late to avoid the accident. Though the engine was reversed, and everything possible done to stop the train, the engine and five freight cars were ditched. The Superintendent, John H. Sullivan, Road Master Wm. Fitzpatrick, Engineers Chas. Saunders and Clinton Rand, and Fireman Chas. Foster were on the engine. Messrs. Sullivan, Rand and Foster jumped the engine, but Fitzpatrick and Saunders remained aboard and were instantly killed, and Sup’t. Sullivan sprained his ankle in jumping from the engine, otherwise no one was injured, though a large number of passengers were aboard, as the passenger cars fortunately remained upon the track.
LATER.—Since the above was in type we have learned the following additional facts and corrections regarding the accident: Sup’t. J. H. Sullivan and Road Master Wm. Fitzpatrick were riding on the pilot and not in the cab. Sullivan did not jump off, and does not know how he escaped death, or yet how he was hurt, and it is a miracle he was not killed, as he was sitting upon the side of the engine that went down. Saunders, Rand and Foster were in the cab, and several cars went over them—one a flat-car, with two men on it, who were unhurt—and after the accident Rand and Foster crawled out of the cab, not uninjured, as stated above, though not seriously hurt. H. S. Lyle, telegraph repairer, was riding on a freight car, and badly hurt by the car falling upon him, rupturing his abdomen. Sup’t. Sullivan and Lyle arrived here yesterday by train—both pretty sore. (Brainerd Tribune, 19 June 1875, p. 1, c. 7)

SEE: 30 January 1875

25 June

About the Sale of the N. P. Railroad.


A letter received from Washington yesterday states that at a meeting of a large number of the bondholders of the N. P. Railroad, held in that city last week, and presided over by Dr. J. Evan Snodgrass, it was determined to appeal to Judge Blatchford, of the U. S. district court, for a modification of his decree ordering the sale of the company property on the first Monday of August. It is somewhat expected that the application will result in a postponement of the sale. (Brainerd Tribune, 26 June 1875, p. 1, c. 4)

29 June
Dr. J. C. Rosser went to St. Paul Tuesday. It is stated, semi-authoritatively, that somethings goine to happen upon his return. Mac. is busy pouring over the doctor’s library through those gold rims and attending patients in his absence. Dr. Mcgahey [sic], ahem! (Brainerd Tribune, 03 July 1875, p. 1, c. 5)

O. C. Green, Sup’t. of Telegraph on the N. P. and L. S. & M., was interviewing friend Pinkerton, at Headquarters, Tuesday. (Brainerd Tribune, 03 July 1875, p. 1, c. 5)

SEE: 02 January 1875
SEE: 27 July 1875
SEE: 08 August 1875
SEE: 28 August 1875


30 June
AT an adjourned meeting of the Northern Pacific bondholders at New York Wednesday, all differences were amicably settled, and a feeling that the investments in the road would yet be saved and the road completed existed.
It is estimated by the officials that the Road already has sufficient rolling stock on the east end to run it through to Montana. (Brainerd Tribune, 03 July 1875, p. 1, c. 5)

Gen’l. [Manager] C. W. Mead and party went west Wednesday after a day in and about Brainerd. (Brainerd Tribune, 03 July 1875, p. 1, c. 7)

24 July

The Northern Pacific R. R.


This Road, with all its property and franchises, is to be sold at auction under decree of Court, August 2d, in New York City for the benefit of the first mortgage bondholders.
The general body of bondholders have united in a plan for protecting their interests, by causing the Road and property to be bid in for them by a Bondholders Committee, selected for the purpose. This Committee consists of Johnston Livingston, New York; Frederick Billings, of Vermont; George Stark, of Massachusetts; J. K. Moorhead and J. N. Hutchinson, of Pennsylvania; and Jno. M. Dennison, of Maryland. The plan of purchase and reorganization represented by this Committee has been unanimously approved by a general meeting of the bondholders. All bondholders who wish to share in the benefits of the plan or desire information, should immediately address THE PURCHASING COMMITTEE, N. P. R. R., at 23 Fifth Avenue, New York. (Brainerd Tribune, 24 July 1875, p. 1, c. 7)

27 July

NP Bridge Collapse


NP Bridge Collapse, 1875.
Source: Images of America: Brainerd, Crow Wing County Historical Society
Anton Mahlum relates, “The year of 1875 [8:30 a.m.] saw the bridge over the Mississippi River collapse under the weight of a train consisting of twelve cars of steel rails and ten [sic] cars of merchandise, killing the engineer, fireman, and one or two caboose passengers. The narrator, then working in the yard as car repairer, under Peter Early, heard the noise of the crash and escaping steam, and ran down the track to the bridge, first stepping in at the Headquarters Hotel for a flask of brandy; coming to the collapsed structure, where on top of the first pier were five survivors sitting on the debris.... There were rich pickings of barrels of flour, pork, and other merchandise floating down the river, and the Indians especially profited by the spill.” (Brainerd’s Half Century, Ingolf Dillan, General Printing Company, Minneapolis, Minnesota: 1923, p. 20)

The Northern Pacific Railroad bridge over the Mississippi River in Brainerd collapses [8:30 a. m.] killing the engineer, fireman and two Native American women from Sawyer. The engine, twelve cars of merchandise and eleven [sic] cars of steel rails go into the river. The span from the west side of the river to the center is the portion that collapses. (Brainerd 1871-1946, Carl Zapffe, Colwell Press, Incorporated, Minneapolis, Minnesota: 1946, p. 12)

A DAY’S ACCIDENTS


FOUR PERSONS KILLED ON THE
NORTHERN PACIFIC RAILROAD


NP Bridge Collapse, 1875.
Source: Minnesota Historical Society
ST. PAUL, Minn., July 27.—News has been received in this city that a mixed train on the Northern Pacific Railroad, consisting of twenty-two cars, went through the bridge across the Mississippi at Brainerd this morning, killing four persons. The bridge is about eighty feet high. The following special dispatch to the Pioneer-Press is all that has been received from the scene of the accident: The railroad officials throw every obstacle in the way of obtaining news. At present it is impossible to say what was the direct cause of the accident, whether a car jumped the track as is stated by a passenger, or whether the train was too heavy for the bridge. The train went down near the middle of the bridge, the engine and forward part of the train backing into the break, and the rear part piling on top. The bridge and cars are almost a total wreck. The following is a list of the dead and injured: Dead—Peterkin, engineer; Grandon, fireman; M. Aiken; two Indian women. Injured—Mrs. M. Warren, of White Earth, hurt in the head and chest; Miss Johnson, of Motley, skull fractured and hip broken. The above went from the top of the bridge into the river. The caboose struck on a pier and broke in two, leaving A. J. Sawyer, of Duluth; Dr. R. C. Lloyd, of Watervliet, Mich., and a stranger from Moorhead among the debris on the top of the pier, where they remained until lowered by ropes. Sawyer was hurt in the face and limbs, although not seriously. Lloyd was injured in the face. The stranger was slightly injured. A Coroner’s inquest will be held tomorrow. (New York Times, 28 July 1875, p. 5)

SEE: 22 February 1873

SEE: 04 August 1875
SEE: 06 August 1875
SEE: 28 August 1875
SEE: 21 October 1875
SEE: 31 October 1875
SEE: 04 September 1875
SEE: 10 September 1875


A FATAL DIVE.
__________

Twenty-two Cars Through a Bridge Over the Mississippi.


The particulars of the great railroad accident yesterday, at Brainerd, will doubtless be found in other columns of the Tribune this morning. In St. Paul few details were received up to the time of forwarding our report. General Manager Mead left for the scene of the disaster in a special train at the rate of thirty miles per hour. The following dispatches were received at General [Manager] Mead’s office:

SECOND DISPATCH.


BRAINERD, July 27.


C. W. Mead, General Manager:
James Peterkin, engineer, Richard Granville [sic] [Grandon], fireman, and one old lady, unknown, are killed. Five ladies and three gentlemen are more or less injured.

THIRD DISPATCH.


BRAINERD, July 27, 11:10 a.m.


C. W. Mead, General Manager:

Two more killed have been found. The only physician here is Dr. Rosser. Men are all hard at work looking for other bodies.

ENGINEER PETERKIN,


who was in charge of the train, was we learn, from Poughkeepsie, N. Y., and unmarried. He had been in the employ of the Northern Pacific Railroad for several years, and is spoken of as a most efficient, reliable and worthy officer and man. He was not the regular engineer of No. 5, but was serving in the place of engineer Richard Bushnell, who had secured a leave of absence the day before, and had come to this city, where he is now, awaiting the arrival of his mother.

A SCOUNDRELLY OPERATOR REFUSES TO SEND NEWS.


We go to press (says The [St. Paul] Dispatch of last evening) with our second edition without any further intelligence of the terrible accident at Brainerd, Minn.
Upon receipt of the news in this city, we telegraphed to a resident of Brainerd, ordering the fullest possible details. This message we understand the Brainerd operator refused to deliver, and also refuses to give any information himself. He is in the employ of the Northern Pacific Company, and is forbidden by the rules of the company from furnishing news matter. Those rules, however, can hardly be considered to extend to refusing to deliver a message addressed to a citizen wholly disconnected with the railroad. All day The [St. Paul] Dispatch office has been besieged by persons anxious to obtain the names of the killed and injured, and the brutal operator at Brainerd has been again and again appealed to, to send the names simply giving no news details. This he has insultingly and infamously refused, and the public must wait in suspense.
The name of this scoundrel is J. G. Pinkerton. We trust the newspaper fraternity will give him a gratuitous advertisement, and The [St. Paul] Dispatch, at least, will conceal his death from his friends if there can be any such good luck as his being killed by the next accident. Pending his hoped for death, we commend his case to the consideration of Manager Mead. If he has any regard for the fair future of the company, he will see that Mr. J. G. Pinkerton leaves its service very promptly. (Minneapolis Tribune, 28 July 1875, p. 3)

SEE: 22 February 1873
SEE: 02 January 1875
SEE: 29 June 1875
SEE: 27 July 1875

SEE: 04 August 1875
SEE: 06 August 1875
SEE: 08 August 1875
SEE: 28 August 1875
SEE: 04 September 1875
SEE: 10 September 1875
SEE: 21 October 1875
SEE: 31 October 1875


The Dispatch Tries to Run the N. P. and Can’t
and Gets Mad About it, As Usual.


The St. Paul Dispatch of the 27th inst. comes to us with a tirade of abuse—Hall’s best, double and twisted—upon the gentlemanly Train Dispatcher of the Northern Pacific, Mr. J. G. Pinkerton. The air of the writer of the article is completely hidden by the unmistakable malice sticking out in every line. The alleged ground of this base attack is the refusal of Mr. Pinkerton to deliver a message for the Dispatch on Tuesday last, the day of the bridge disaster, or to send the details of the disaster to the Dispatch, while the facts are as follows: The General Manager, Mr. Mead; the Superintendent, Mr. Sullivan; the Bridge Superintendent, Mr. Wallis [sic]; and the resident Engineer, Mr. Kimberley, were all absent from the city. Every officer and employee of the Road, in Brainerd, was at the wreck trying to save life and render what assistance to the suffering that was in their power, while Mr. Pinkerton more than had his hands full communicating with and transmitting orders to and from the absent officers, running the numerous trains on the Road, sending messages to the friends of the deceased and wounded, and conducting the business of his office without running over the city delivering messages for the Dispatch or anyone else, and the rules of the Company strictly prohibit him from transmitting news. Mr. Pinkerton had numerous calls that day for particulars, etc., but he deemed it most prudent to give the business of his office the preference, and it is just possible Mr. Mead will please himself in regard to the impertinent demands of the Dispatch for his discharge. Hall may, doubtless will, when he cools off and learns who Mr. Pinkerton is, retract what he has said, but that does not exculpate him from the dastardly attack or make it any the less villainous and cowardly, and will be now viewed by those interested. (Brainerd Tribune, 31 July 1875, p. 1, c. 7)

SEE: 02 January 1875
SEE: 29 June 1875
SEE: 08 August 1875
SEE: 28 August 1875


TERRIBLE DISASTER AT
BRAINERD.
____________________

THE RAILROAD BRIDGE GIVES
WAY.
____________________

A whole Freight Train, Twenty-three
Cars and Engine Precipitated
Sixty Feet into the Mis-
sissippi River.
____________________

ENGINEER, FIREMAN, AND TWO
PASSENGERS KILLED.
____________________


NP Bridge Collapse, 1875.
Source: Minnesota Historical Society
A few minutes before 8 o’clock Tuesday morning, and just after the departure of the freight train west, we were startled by a terrible crash, accompanied by the rushing of escaping steam, that told us in unmistakable language that the Mississippi railroad bridge had gone down with the train, though we were at the time in our office—over half a mile distant. We were not long in reaching the scene of the disaster, and there we beheld a spectacle that baffles description, though it is riveted upon our mind so completely that we never can forget it while we live.
In order that our readers may properly understand the following poor account of the accident, a description of the bridge is here necessary.
It was a Howe truss, with one up-right span, one shore span, and an abutment on either side; the length of the upright and deck spans 134 feet each, total length of bridge and approaches 650 feet, height 59 1-10 feet from low water mark to the track. The upright, western deck, and shore spans and abutment were a total wreck, with the complete train consisting of engine, tender, twenty-two cars and caboose at the bottom of the river.
For a time every thing was as still as death, with the exception of the hissing engine and the rushing waters under the eastern deck span, being almost completely dammed up by the wreck in the other two spans.
In an almost incredibly short space of time nearly every citizen of the place was present, but no one knew how many passengers were on the train, whether any had escaped death or not, or whether life in any shape or form existed in the terrible mass of debris and destruction.
Not very long, however, in this state did the excited crowd remain. Our attention was very soon called to the eastern river pier, upon the top of which had lodged a portion of the caboose, and we beheld three men crawling out of the wreck and seating themselves as best they could until help could reach them. The blood streaming from their faces and hands told they were not unhurt though they answered the inquiries as to their condition that they were not badly hurt. We were next startled by the almost gratifying sound of screaming from the wreck below, which appeared under ground, as though from some bottomless pit, but told of life and hope. Boats were launched from the ferry and soon at the wreck, and the work of extracting the human victims from the horrible mass began.
The first to receive assistance was a half-breed girl, Miss Lizzy Harriman, a step-daughter of Daniel Moore, of Fort Ripley, she was but slightly injured.
The next was Mrs. Magdaline Aitkin, an elderly Indian woman, of White Earth, Minn., her lower limbs were badly fractured in several places, and she was otherwise severely injured, but alive, though she died about three hours afterward.
The next, Miss Abbie Johnson, a daughter of Wm. and Mary Johnson, and granddaughter of Colin Priestly, of Motley, Minn., was brought ashore and taken to the house of W. H. Lewis, Esq., where her sister was residing. Miss Johnson was found to be very seriously injured, her right thigh being broken, her head badly bruised, amounting to a contusion of the brain, and her chest jarred internally. She lingered a great sufferer until yesterday morning at about three o’clock, when she died. She was taken to her home yesterday, and will be buried to-day. She was born in Aroostook Co., Me. Age 16 years.
In the meantime a boat had gone across to the engine in quest of the engineer and fireman, and at this juncture returned with their bodies, life almost extinct. The engineer, James Peterkin, did not speak after he was found, and died in a few minutes after he was brought ashore. He was a young unmarried man, about 25 years of age, a native of Poughkeepsie, New York, and had many warm friends on the line. His remains were taken to his people, leaving here Wednesday.
The fireman, Richard Grandon, did not long survive the engineer (about 15 minutes), he had his senses till he died, and talked very intelligibly, giving instructions about his business, etc. He said they could have jumped, but Peterkin stood to his post trying to save the engine by breaking the coupling, and he would not desert him. His leg was broken and nearly severed from his body, and it was found necessary to cut the remaining cords and fibres with a knife in order to free him from the engine. He also was a young single man, about the same age as Peterkin. He has a brother in Omaha, Neb. He was buried here Wednesday.
Mrs. Matilda La Fontain, a daughter of Mrs. Aitkin, above named, and the mother of Tyler Warren, of White Earth, was next to come ashore. Her injuries were slight, comparatively, a broken rib and some bruises being the extent. She and her mother were taken to the Bishop House, where they were cared for, and where Mrs. La Fontain still remains.
The last was the dead body of Buk-quan-ja, an Indian woman, a sister of Mrs. Aitkin.
Attention was next directed to the three men on the pier. They were let down into the boat below by ropes and brought ashore, and proved to be A. J. Sawyer, of the commission house of Sawyer & Davis, of Duluth; Dr. J. C. Lamb, of Watervielt, Mich.; and Louis Thirgart, of Moorhead, Minn. Mr. Sawyer had some bruises about the head, a small cut on the wrist and a sprained leg. Dr. Lamb’s upper lip was badly cut, being split up past his nose into his cheek, and his left arm and leg slightly bruised. Mr. Thirgart was bruised in several places about the head and limbs, and considerably jarred.
These it was found by this time constituted all the passengers, and ended the search about an hour after the disaster.
M. T. Salisbury, who was conducting the train for the regular conductor, R. Bushnell, who was away on leave of absence, and the brakeman, J. R. Wauh [sic], very narrowly escaped injury by jumping from the train to the bridge and running back to terra firma, and it is generally supposed that after they struck the bridge they made tolerably good time until they were at a safe distance; though they appeared to know but little about it themselves.
The wounded, excepting Mr. Sawyer, who went home Wednesday, are under the care and treatment of Dr. J. C. Rosser, receiving every attention, are progressing finely; and will very soon be entirely recovered.
The accident has been a very severe one, the greatest ever met with on this road, which has been noted for its freedom from accident.
The amount of damage sustained by the road in the loss of the train, freights, etc., we have been unable to learn, but it must be very large as the cars were all loaded.
The transfer of passengers across the river, by the ferry, was commenced the day of the accident, and will be continued until a temporary bridge is erected upon which work is progressing with all possible speed, and no delay in travel ensues, and very little to freight, as the bridge will be ready for trains by this day week, Aug. 7th.
Many theories existing regarding the cause of the disaster, a coroner’s jury was summoned on Wednesday by the coroner, Dr. Rosser, and an investigation had, which lasted through Wednesday, Thursday, and until noon yesterday, and the following verdict was arrived at at 5 o’clock yesterday evening:

STATE OF MINNESOTA, County
} ss.
of Crow Wing.

A card advertising the services of Dr. Rosser, 06 May 1876.
Source: Brainerd Tribune
An inquisition taken at the City of Brainerd, in the County of Crow Wing, on the 28th day of July, A. D. 1875, before J. C. Rosser, coroner of said County of Crow Wing, upon view of the bodies of James Peterkin and Richard Grandon, lying there dead by the oaths of the jurors, whose names are hereunto subscribed, who being sworn to inquire on behalf of the State of Minnesota, when, how, and by what means the said James Peterkin and Richard Grandon came to their death upon their oaths do say: That the above named persons came to their death on the 27th day of July, A. D. 1875, by the falling of the railroad bridge over the Mississippi river, at or near Brainerd, Minnesota, while freight train No. 5, drawn by engine No. 45, of which they were engineer and fireman respectively was passing over;
And we further find that the above train, No. 5, was passing over the bridge at the usual speed of about four miles per hour. That the west span of the bridge broke first, caused by its being constructed of unsuitable and unseasoned timber; that it broke by the actual weight of the train; and that the whole bridge was considered unsafe by many persons not connected with the Northern Pacific Railroad, and several that were men who were competent to judge of its condition.
And we find further, That the several officials of the Northern Pacific Railroad, whose duty it was to make examinations of the bridge, as to its safety, were either incompetent to judge of its condition, or were guilty of gross neglect in not making the necessary repairs.
And we further find, That the conductor of the train did not warn the passengers of their danger when he had ample time to have done so.
H. D. PETTIBONE,
J. L. STARCHER,
E. L. STRAUSS,
THOS. P. CANTWELL,
W. H. LELAND,
H. G. COYKENDALL.

In giving this verdict to the public we do not wish to be understood as advancing it as our theory or opinion in the matter. There is to this, as every thing else, two sides to the argument, and while we give the verdict as one side, we think it but simple justice that the other side be heard.
If the bridge went down by the actual weight of the train, owning to inherent defects in the bridge of long standing, why has it not gone down before, when far greater weight has been upon it, and under less favorable circumstances? Two and three engines, coupled together, have crossed it repeatedly, and that too since the time it is claimed it has been unsafe! And why did the engine at this time, which weighs three times as much as the cars, pass over it in safety, and the cars break it down? For the testimony, all goes to show that the engine and several cars were off the bridge when it fell.
The testimony of none of the passengers was taken before the jury, and it will be remembered that one of them, Mr. Sawyer of Duluth, persisted very strongly that a car jumped the track and caused the disaster. It will also be remembered that the testimony of all experts taken before the jury, with one exception, pronounced the bridge in a safe condition, and that one said it was a safe and good bridge up to the time he was discharged from the services of the company as bridge inspector and repairer.
And as to the conductor, it must be remembered that he was inexperienced and that his “ample time” was extremely limited, taking into consideration the fact that he did not know that the whole bridge was not going down. We think it very expedient under such circumstances for every man to look out for himself. (Brainerd Tribune, 31 July 1875, p. 1, c.’s 5 & 6)

SEE: 22 February 1873
SEE: 04 August 1875
SEE: 06 August 1875
SEE: 21 August 1875
SEE: 28 August 1875
SEE: 04 September 1875
SEE: 10 September 1875
SEE: 21 October 1875
SEE: 31 October 1875

28 July

THE BRAINERD RAILROAD BRIDGE DISASTER.

FURTHER ACCOUNTS OF THE WRECK—NARROW ESCAPE OF A BRAKEMAN—THE WOUNDED DOING WELL.


ST. PAUL, Minn., July 28.—Persons who have arrived from the scene of the railroad bridge disaster at Brainerd furnish additional particulars of interest. As the train was crossing the bridge the engineer heard a cracking and put on steam to escape, but his efforts proved too late to save his life. The central span of the bridge broke down under the weight of the cars loaded with iron, and both ends of the train were drawn into the wreck, the engine and several cars being drawn backward and the remainder of the train forward. The central span and the two western spans of the bridge went down, the engine, tender, and two cars that were pulled backward falling on the west shore, and the remainder going into the river. The crash made by the wreck was heard at a distance of three-quarters of a mile. The river at this point is about 300 feet wide, and the water is from six to eight feet deep. There appears to have been but one brakeman on the train. Luckily, he was behind the cars loaded with iron, and as he saw them going down he ran for his life across the top of the freight cars, but finding he could not reach the end of the train in time, he climbed down upon the ladder upon one of the cars, and jumped off on the portion of the bridge which remained standing, and was unhurt.
The wreck is described as frightful to behold. With the exception of the engine and the two cars on the west bank, the entire train, numbering, including the caboose, twenty-one [sic] cars, is piled in a heap in the river. The cars are completely smashed into kindling-wood. All accounts agree that the bridge absolutely broke down beneath the weight of the train, and that no car left the track until the break occurred. The names sent yesterday include all the persons fatally injured. The few wounded are doing well and will soon recover. (New York Times, 29 July 1875, p. 4)

31 July

Another Railroad Accident, on the
Lake Superior and Mississippi Railroad.


At 5 o’clock this morning the regular freight train, No. 10, going North and an extra freight going South, collided in a cut four miles south of Black Hoof on the L. S. & M. R. R. The engineer and fireman on No. 10 jumped from their engine and were saved. The engineer and fireman on the extra remained on their engine and the fireman, Miles [sic], was killed instantly, and engineer Matt. Eagen seriously injured—it is thought fatally. The engines are a total wreck.
It is stated that the conductor Heaney forgot that the other train was coming which caused the accident. (Brainerd Tribune, 31 July 1875, p. 1, c. 6)

SEE: 07 August 1875

03 August

THE BRAINERD BRIDGE DISASTER.


The Coroner’s investigation of the causes which led to the giving way of the railroad bridge at Brainerd, whereby a train of cars was precipitated into the river and several persons killed, results in a verdict of censure against the employees of the N.P.R.R., whose duty it was to have seen that the necessary repairs to the bridge were made. There is no doubt but the bridge was substantially built, of good material, and fully up to the standard required by the contract. But it is necessary to secure the safety of any bridge that it should be kept in repair, and this seems not to have been done with the Brainerd bridge. Several persons testify to having reported the dangerous condition of the bridge, but somehow, the man whose duty it was to order the necessary repairs to be made seems never to have been notified, or to have neglected his duty. His neglect has been attended with a most lamentable loss of life, and great loss of property to the company. It is to be regretted that the Coroner’s jury could not have placed its censure directly upon the individual who is responsible for this accident, for surely some one person was chargeable with the case of this bridge. Who it was is not shown by the testimony, nor does the jury seem to have taken any pains to find out. They simply said “that the several officials of the Northern Pacific railway whose duty it was to make examination of the bridge, as to its safety, were either incompetent to judge of its condition, or were guilty of gross neglect in not making the necessary repairs.” Which is as definite as if they had said “the people of the United States are to blame for the accident for having permitted the road to be built.” Furthermore, it is an unjust reflection upon the officers of the road in general, and may be held to include everybody, from the President down to the switch tenders. It was within the province of this jury to fix this responsibility definitely upon some one or half a dozen individuals, to have called them by name, and to have presented them to the grand jury for such action as it might deem proper. The builders of the bridge cannot be held responsible, for it was well built, was a strong, substantial structure when completed, and pronounced by experts as good as any railroad bridge in their country for the purpose required. The managers of the road cannot be held responsible, for they had specially designated certain of their employees to take charge of this section of the road, including the bridge, and to keep everything in good order. All that seems to have been required was a daily supervision to have kept it in good serviceable condition. But timbers were allowed to work loose, one or two to decay, nuts and bolts were missing, and finally the bridge, from want of attention to these little matters, sagged below its proper line, and became unsafe. Even when this fact was reported and the bridge pronounced dangerous, the person whose business it was to see to it, seems to have paid no attention to it whatever, but left it unrepaired, till finally death and destruction have resulted. This sacrifice of human life seems to have been wholly unnecessary, attributable entirely to the most culpable neglect. The loss to the railroad company is also a serious one, the bridge being a costly structure, while involved in the ruin are cars, locomotive, and a large amount of freight. The Coroner’s jury having failed to point out the guilty author of this disaster, we presume the railroad company will be more thorough in its investigation, and will fix the responsibility right where it belongs. (Minneapolis Tribune, 03 August 1875, p. 2)

The Bridge Good Enough—Verdict by the Engineers on the Brainerd Trap.
____

The invited engineers to Brainerd have given out the following intelligent view of the Brainerd bridge disaster:


BRAINERD, Aug. 3,


To C. W. Mead, Esq., General Manager for Brainerd N.P. Railroad:

DEAR SIR:—The undersigned have to-day, in response to your request, made an examination of the wreck of the Northern Pacific Railway bridge at Brainerd, as it lies, and of the remaining east span of the said bridge as it now stands, with a view of accounting if possible, for the casualty. We find nothing in the appearance of the debris of the wrecked spans to justify us in attributing the wreck to defective or improper materials or workmanship or design in the original construction, or to the want of proper attention and repairs since it was built. We find the east truss yet in place, and in good and safe condition. This truss was constructed at the same time that the others were, and we are informed that it has received the same care and attentions from the officers of the road. If we may judge of the condition of the other trusses from our examination of this one, they could not have been broken by the weight of any ordinary train. While we find ourselves unable to definitely describe the manner of the wreck, we are unanimously of the opinion that it was caused by some accident to one of the flat cars loaded with rails, crossing the bridge at the time by which a part of the car or a rail became entangled in the truss, thereby displacing some of the timbers nearly or immediately over the west channel pier.
Most of us are acquainted with Mr. S. J. Wallace, the foreman of bridge repairs on the Northern Pacific road, and know him to be a competent and faithful man in the discharge of such duties.
We are very respectfully, &c.,
[Signed]
J. W. Bisnor, Gen. Man. & Chf. Eng. St. P. & S. C.
F. R. Delano, Civil Engineer.
Chas. A. F. Morris, Chf. Eng. St. P. & P.
J. S. Sewall, Civil Eng. and Builder.
C. H. Prior, Supt. M. & St. Paul. (Minneapolis Tribune, 05 August 1875, p. 3)

The Bridge Disaster—Examina-
tion of the Wreck by Scientific
Experts, and Their Report, Ex-
onerating The Management of
The Road.


On Tuesday last a party of Scientific experts, consisting of C. A. F. Morris, Chief Engineer of the St. Paul & Pacific railroad; J. W. Bishop, Chief Engineer and General Manager of the St. Paul & Sioux City railroad; C. H. Prior, Superintendent and Engineer of the Milwaukee & St. Paul railroad, now Civil Engineer of St. Paul, and Hon. F. R. Delano, of the St. Paul & Pacific railroad, arrived here pursuant to an invitation from General Manager Mead, to make a thorough examination of the wreck with a view to arriving at and reporting the general character of the structure, and the most probable cause in their opinion of the disaster.
The following is their report:


BRAINERD, AUG. 3, 1875.

To C. W. Mead, General Manager for Receiver
N. P. Railroad:
Dear Sir:—The undersigned have to-day, in response to your request made an examination of the wreck of the Northern Pacific railway bridge at Brainerd as it lies, and of the remaining east span of the said bridge as it now stands, with the view of accounting, if possible, for the casualty. We find nothing in the appearance of the debris of the wrecked span to justify us in attributing the wreck to defective or improper materials or workmanship, or design in the original construction or to the want of proper attention and repairs since it was built. We find the east truss yet in place, and in good and safe condition. This truss was constructed at the same time and as the others were, and we are informed that it has received the same care and attention from the officers of the road. If we may judge of the condition of the other trusses from our examination of this one, they could not have been broken by the weight of any ordinary train. While we find ourselves unable to definitely describe the manner of the wreck, we are unanimously of the opinion that it was caused by some accident to one of the flat cars loaded with rails, crossing the bridge at the time by which a part of the car or a rail became entangled in the truss, thereby displacing some of the timbers nearly or immediately over the west channel pier.
Most of us are acquainted with Mr. S. J. Wallace, the foreman of bridge repairs on the Northern Pacific road, and know him to be a competent and faithful man in the discharge of such duties.
We are, very respectfully, etc.
(Signed)
J. W. Bishop, General Manager and Chief Engineer St. P. & S. C. R. R.
F. R. Delano, Civil Engineer.
Chas. A. F. Morris, Chief Engineer St. P. & P. R. R.
J. S. Sewall, Civil Engineer and Builder.
C. H. Prior, Superintendent M. & St. Paul R. R.

This report confirms the testimony before the coroner of M. C. Kimberley, resident engineer; M. P. Martin, assistant engineer; S. J. Wallace, superintendent of bridges, and H. J. Bradford, bridge builder and repairer of the N. P. road. Very many theories or opinions exist aside from this, as to the cause of the accident; in fact nearly every man you meet has an opinion of his own, and nearly all differ. They are all only opinions after all, for the real cause can never be ascertained to a certainty. There are hundreds of ways it might have happened, the bridge might have been tampered with, some of the braces cut or cords weakened by some malicious party or parties. Some of the rods may have been parted in a place and manner that would defy detection. A car wheel might have been broken, or a rail broken, and so a hundred other “might-have-beens” could be named all with equally as good grounds as any theory we have yet heard. But we think that men who have spent a life-time in this business are far better prepared to give a reliable opinion that we who know nothing about the bridge scarcely farther than the fact that it is built to cross on, and we think (and quite strongly, too) that the imputation that the witnesses we have named above perjured themselves because they are in the employ of the company, through fear of being discharged, and that the Board of Engineers above named compromised their reputation and veracity by making a false report in the matter simply because they were invited here by Mr. Mead “to make a thorough examination of the affair and report the facts,” is simply too contracted a view to meet with aught but scorn. (Brainerd Tribune, 07 August 1875, p. 1, c. 5)

04 August

I. O. O. F.
PREAMBLE AND RESOLUTIONS.


At a regular meeting of Wildey Lodge, No. 37, I. O. O. F., held in their hall in Bly’s building, on Wednesday evening, August 4th, 1875, the following preamble and resolutions were unanimously adopted:
Whereas, Brother Richard Grandon, of our Lodge, and Bro. James Peterkin, of Council Bluffs, Lodge No. 49, of Iowa, lost their lives while at their post of duty on the morning of July 27th, 1875.
And Whereas, The visiting Brothers and citizens of Brainerd so cordially and heartily assisted the members of Wildey Lodge, No. 37, I. O. O. F., of Brainerd, Minn., in paying their last tribute of respect to the two deceased Brothers above mentioned.
Therefore be it Resolved, That we tender to the visiting Brothers, the citizens of Brainerd, and to the officers and employees of the N. P. R. R. our heart felt thanks and gratitude for their kindness, attention and assistance to us, in this our first bereavement since the foundation of our Order in this city.
Resolved further, That our Secretary be requested to have these resolutions published in the Brainerd Tribune.
Attest: JAMES DEWAR,
Recording Secretary.
(Brainerd Tribune, 07 August 1875, p. 1, c. 6)

SEE: 22 February 1873
SEE: 27 July 1875
SEE: 06 August 1875
SEE: 28 August 1875
SEE: 04 September 1875
SEE: 21 October 1875
SEE: 31 October 1875

06 August

A ROTTEN BRIDGE.

THE RECENT NORTHERN PACIFIC DISASTER
—CENSURE FROM A CORONER’S JURY
.


The St. Paul (Minn.) Dispatch prints a full report of the evidence before the Coroner’s jury in relation to the recent accident on the Northern Pacific Railroad near Brainerd, Minn., from which it appears that the bridge has been in an unsafe condition since May last, its condition being a subject of common talk among citizens and having been reported to Kimberley, resident engineer of the Northern Pacific, and Wallace, the bridge foreman, who examined the bridge. Wallace said in June he was going to repair the bridge, and was told by Edward White, bridge-builder by occupation, that it was time; if he didn’t soon he would have a train through it. White and other witnesses swore that on account of the centre piers being low, the bridge sagged down in the centre; that one of the lower cords was dangerously rotten; that some of the braces were rotten; that the bolts needed tightening; that the foot-braces and step-iron to the braces were broken; that one of the side-braces was two inches out of place, and that the west span had swayed two inches from its place. One witness saw the bridge swinging sideways as trains went over, and cautioned the company employees, saying it was likely to be displaced by such swinging, so that it would break down under the next following train. One passenger thought the cars were off the track when the bridge went down. All the others thought none went off the track till after the bridge broke. The company’s officers and employees hold the theory that the bridge was broken by a car-brake falling down and throwing some car off the track and against the side of the bridge. The jury’s verdict, however, is as follows:
That the above-named persons, Peterkin and Grandson [sic] [Grandon], came to their deaths on the 27th of July, 1875, by the falling of the railroad bridge over the Mississippi River at or near Brainerd, Minn., while freight train No. 5, drawn by engine No. 45, of which they were engineer and fireman respectively, was passing over; and we further find that the above train No. 5, was passing the bridge at the usual speed, about four miles per hour; that the west span of the bridge broke first, caused by its being constructed of unsuitable and unsound timber; that it broke by the actual weight of the train, and that the whole bridge was considered unsafe by persons not connected with the Northern Pacific Railroad, and several who were—men who were competent to judge of its condition; and we further find that several officials of the Northern Pacific Railroad, whose duty it was to make examination of the bridge as to its safety, were either incompetent to judge of its condition or were guilty of gross neglect in not making the necessary repairs; and we further find that the conductor of said train did not warn the passengers of their danger when he had ample time to have done so.
The above censure of the conductor was based on his own evidence, that, after looking out from the caboose and discovering what had happened, he jumped from the car without saying anything to his passengers, who, if they had been then warned, could have easily escaped. (New York Times, 06 August 1875, p. 2)

SEE: 20 September 1870
SEE: 22 February 1873
SEE: 01 April 1873
SEE: 10 May 1873
SEE: 27 July 1875
SEE: 04 August 1875
SEE: 28 August 1875
SEE: 10 September 1875
SEE: 21 October 1875
SEE: 31 October 1875

Some of the coroner’s jury, to sustain their verdict against the N. P. Road, brought into the city yesterday a stick of timber, eight or ten feet long, with a rotten spot in the middle of it two or three feet long and three or four inches deep, claiming it is a piece of the defective cord so much has been said about. But we have been told that Ahrens Bros. claim the timber, and that it is not a part of the bridge at all, and if it was it did not break where the rotten place is, but is sound timber at both ends. (Brainerd Tribune, 07 August 1875, p. 1, c. 7)

07 August
The temporary bridge over the Mississippi here is fast approaching completion, and trains will cross Wednesday with good luck. (Brainerd Tribune, 07 August 1875, p. 1, c. 3)

Facts and Figures.


We are under obligations to J. B. Power, Esq., Land Commissioner of the Northern Pacific Railroad, for the following figures, showing the amount of land sales by the Land Department at this place up to July 31st, when the disposal of lands at private sale was closed by decree of the Circuit Court.
Sales to June 30th, 1875, 370,605.80 acres—$1,997,595.56. Month of July, 91,897.87 acres—$412,347.57. Total, 462,503.67 acres—$2,409,943.13. Average price per acre, $5.21. And to Mr. Bloom, in the Auditor’s office we are indebted for the statement that 1,600 Mennonites have passed west over this Road during the months of May, June and July to July 31st. We think this pretty thoroughly explodes the General Hazen bubble, and establishes the fact, beyond a shadow of doubt, that the Northern Pacific Railroad is opening up a vast belt of territory from the lakes to the Pacific that is destined at no distant day to be one of the richest, most thriving sections of the globe. It is a generally conceded fact already demonstrated, that the Yellowstone and other valleys along the route of the N. P. excell anything yet heard of in the United States for stock raising and the purposes of general tillage; and those have not yet been reached. The Red River valley that four years ago was almost totally uninhabited for want of a railroad, is now as thickly settled and prosperous a farming district as exists in the State. (Brainerd Tribune, 07 August 1875, p. 1, c. 5)

POWER:
SEE: 05 October 1871
SEE: 01 April 1873
SEE: 03 May 1873

SEE: 01 December 1873
SEE: 27 December 1873
SEE: 10 January 1874
SEE: 06 June 1874
SEE: 12 September 1874
SEE: 28 November 1874
SEE: 06 February 1875
SEE: 20 March 1875
SEE: 12 April 1875
SEE: 09 October 1875
SEE: 19 February 1876
SEE: 22 July 1876
SEE: 07 October 1876
SEE: 25 April 1877
SEE: 14 June 1877
SEE: 04 August 1877
SEE: 06 October 1877
SEE: 23 October 1877
SEE: 02 November 1877
SEE: 18 June 1878
SEE: 20 July 1878
SEE: 06 August 1878
SEE: 21 September 1878
SEE: 28 September 1878
SEE: 10 May 1879
SEE: 05 July 1879
SEE: 30 July 1879
SEE: 27 September 1879
SEE: 18 February 1880
SEE: 21 February 1880
SEE: 28 August 1880
SEE: 31 August 1880
SEE: 04 September 1880
SEE: 16 September 1880
SEE: 09 October 1880
SEE: 09 December 1880
SEE: 25 December 1880
SEE: 17 February 1881
SEE: 21 February 1881
SEE: 26 February 1881
SEE: 09 April 1881
SEE: 13 April 1881
SEE: 23 April 1881
SEE: 19 May 1881
SEE: 11 June 1881
SEE: 23 July 1881
SEE: 01 September 1881
SEE: 03 October 1881
SEE: 06 December 1881
SEE: 30 July 1882
SEE: 02 August 1882
SEE: 05 February 1917

L. S. & M. Collision.


The following is the verdict of the coroner’s jury in the matter of the collision on the L. S. & M. R. R., recorded by us last week. The name of the fireman killed should have been Daniel Curtain, instead of Miles, as stated in our last:
“That the said Daniel Curtain came to his death by the collision of the regular freight train, No. 10, and an eastern freight train, bound south, on the L. S. & M. railroad, which took place about eight and one-half miles north of Moose Lake, on the morning of the 31st day of July, 1875; and we also find the conductor, John Heaney, and engineer Matt. Egan, of the extra freight train guilty of gross negligence of duty and a direct disobedience of orders, and are responsible for the disaster and death of the said Daniel Curtain.” (Brainerd Tribune, 07 August,1875, p. 1, c. 6)

SEE: 31 July 1875

The Northern Pacific loss in freighting alone in the wreck here of the 27th ult. is $10,000.00, the temporary bridge will cost $6,000.00 in all $16,000.00 in cash, besides the loss of the cars, engine, and bridge which cannot be estimated. (Brainerd Tribune, 07 August 1875, p. 1, c. 7)

County Attorney Holland is terribly out of patience with the progress of the R. R. bridge. He has a new hat bet that trains will cross on it next Friday, and he thinks the work don’t go on fast enough. He thinks of going to work on it himself Monday. (Brainerd Tribune, 07 August 1875, p. 1, c. 7)

08 August

THE BRAINERD OPERATOR.

Why J. C. Pinkerton Failed to Send Accounts of the Brainerd Disaster—Investigation by Superintendent O. C. Green.
______________


AS THE TRIBUNE copied the article of the St. Paul Dispatch concerning the alleged refusal of the telegraph operator at Brainerd to send the names of the killed and other particulars for publication, it deems it but an act of simple justice to publish the following exculpatory letter from Superintendent Green, to Assistant Superintendent Hankinson, of this city. It will be seen that the Brainerd operator furnished the news in his possession promptly as possible, and that he did nothing more reprehensible in the case than to obey instructions from the general management of the Northern Pacific road. Mr. Green says:
“Referring to the enclosed papers. I will say that I have investigated the case sufficiently to find that Mr. Pinkerton claims that he had no desire nor intention to suppress the message mentioned, and that he did, as soon as he had an opportunity, deliver it. That he has no messenger, and could not leave the office himself, having no assistance whatever as operator and train dispatcher, and it being of the most urgent importance that he should be at his post. As far as furnishing information himself is concerned, to outside parties, it would have been contrary to his instructions.
The General Manager was in communication with Brainerd, and gathered most of the facts reading the accident, to which I understand the Dispatch had access, and as far as I can learn, their very brutal article seems uncalled for. Mr. Pinkerton claims that the officers of the road fully sustain him. I have not been able to see them yet. Yours rsp’y,
O. C. Green, Supt.
(Minneapolis Tribune, 08 August 1875, p. 8)

SEE: 02 January 1875
SEE: 29 June 1875
SEE: 27 July 1875
SEE: 28 August 1875


12 August

Northern Pacific Sold.


NEW YORK, August 12.—The Northern Pacific railroad was sold to-day to the purchasing committee of bondholders for nominally $100,000. There was no competition. (Brainerd Tribune, 14 August 1875, p. 1, c. 6)

14 August

A Very Reasonable and Sensible
View of the Verdict of the Brain-
erd Jury by the Pioneer-Press.


The Pioneer-Press wishes the jury in the Brainerd Bridge case and all its readers to understand that it does not undertake to decide the questions raised by our special reporter’s criticisms of their investigation of that matter, and their verdict as to the cause of the disaster. We have printed his report and conclusions as we printed the testimony elicited at the inquest and the verdict of the jury, the conclusions arrived at by the committee of scientific experts, and the letters of Dr. Rosser and Mr. Coykendall, as a part of the testimony in the case. The Pioneer-Press unhesitatingly accepts the deliberate conclusions of the eminent and distinguished engineers, who were summoned to investigate the wreck and the cause of the disaster, as for the present conclusive against the theory of the jury that the disaster was caused by the defective and precarious condition of the bridge, or its inability to sustain the weight of the train. We accept the judgment of competent experts, wholly free from bias, or any motives for a partial or incorrect decision, as decisive, in the absence of any equally weighty testimony to sustain the conclusions of the jury; and we accept it the more readily and confidently because we know some of the gentlemen who subscribed to the decision, and know that nothing could induce them to record a professional opinion on such a subject, unless it expressed their honest and unbiased conviction. We express no opinion whether the members of the jury were influenced by sentiments of personal hostility to the present manager of the Northern Pacific railroad company, as our report honestly concluded, after a full examination of the facts on the ground. And on general principles we do not blame them for their verdict. As a general rule when a railroad bridge gives way under a train so as to cause loss of life it is a reasonable presumption prima facie that the disaster was caused from some defect in the structure, and justice and the security of the traveling public require that the company or management should be held to the strictest accountability for such disasters. It is perfectly natural that a jury of citizens summoned to the scene of such a tragic catastrophe to inquire into its causes should show the general and natural presumption that it was caused by the fragility or defective condition of the structure, and that they should show the general popular indignation which is always excited when from some unknown cause a bridge breaks up under a train and human life is sacrificed. It is easy to suppose that the jury controlled, by this prepossession and inflamed with this indignation, would have given the verdict they did without necessarily supposing they were influenced by personal hostility to the responsible officers of the company. This is what the Pioneer-Press meant when it spoke of the jury as “prejudiced and probably excited”—not meaning to endorse or accept the conclusions of our reporter as to the personal bias, which is to the Pioneer-Press still an undecided question, but referring to the natural popular prejudice against any corporation or management which allows such sanguinary casualties to occur, and to the spontaneous indignation which such tragedies always excite in the public mind. The Pioneer-Press desires further to say that the testimony before the jury showed that at least there were reasonable grounds for the hypothesis that the bridge might possibly have been in an unsound and unsafe condition. And in that case it was their duty to bring in a verdict to that effect. An exculpatory verdict under the circumstances was not desirable, and though the positive condemnation of the character of the bridge included in their verdict was not sustained by the scientific experts who examined it, and would not probably, therefore, be sustained by a judicial investigation, yet in a preliminary proceeding like a coroner's inquest, it was a great deal better to err on the side of the too strong and comprehensive, than too weak and narrow an indictment; and it was eminently proper that the verdict should be such as should bring the case up for a searching investigation of the causes of the disaster and the official responsibility therefor before the courts. So that while we accept the conclusions of the scientific experts as far more likely to be correct than those of the coroner’s jury, we by no means wish it understood that we are disposed to censure them for their verdict. On the contrary, we regard it, though somewhat too positive in its inculpations, as on the whole a wholesome verdict, insuring a searching judicial inquiry into the facts, and a full disclosure of any blame that may lie at the doors of the officers of the company. As long as there is, or was, any ground to suspect that the disaster was, or might have been, caused by any official carelessness, a wholly exculpatory verdict would have been a public calamity, in that it would have tended to weaken the sense of official responsibility on the part of railroad companies for imperiling human life by their want of prudence and forethought. (Brainerd Tribune, 14 August 1875, p. 1, c. 5)

Notwithstanding the sad calamities the Northern Pacific has met of late, Col. R. M. Newport and staff made their usual monthly trip over the road this week with the pay car paying up for July, while very few if any roads exist in the State that are not from two to six months behind. The Northern Pacific is certainly the best paying road in this State. (Brainerd Tribune, 14 August 1875, p. 1, c. 7)

Local Rip-Raps


—The first train passed over the new trestle bridge at Brainerd on Wednesday evening at 9 o'clock. (Duluth Minnesotian, 14 August 1875)

The New Bridge.


The temporary bridge across the Mississippi at this point was completed Wednesday, less than two weeks from the time it was commenced, and the regular passenger trains crossed over on it Wednesday evening, being held here a few hours for the finishing touches.
Very many availed themselves of the opportunity to ride over it, and their safe arrival at this side was greeted by loud cheers from the large crowd assembled to witness the first test of the structure, and the loud and long whistle of the crossing locomotive as she reached the bank, like a great shout of triumph, was taken up and repeated by the locomotives standing on either bank, reminding one of some large monster greeting its mates after a hard fought battle.
A motion for three cheers for Mr. Wallace, the Superintendent of the construction of the bridge, was responded to with loud huzzahs, and once more this great public thoroughfare, the Northern Pacific, was opened for travel and freights. (Brainerd Tribune, 14 August 1875, p. 4, c. 2)

17 August
T. F. Lowe, who for a long time has filled the position of Clerk at the Headquarters Hotel at this place; departed for his home in Illinois on Tuesday, and his place is filled by Richard Ahrens, of Cass County. (Brainerd Tribune, 21 August 1875, p. 1, c. 6)

18 August

Another Railroad Smash on the
L. S. & M.


WHITE BEAR, Aug. 18.—A freight train comprising twenty-five cars left here at 6:25 last evening, and had proceeded six or seven miles, when crossing a bridge it ran into a herd of cattle, ditching the engine, tender and twelve cars. Fortunately no passengers were on board.
The engineer, Miller, and conductor were badly bruised, but will both recover. (Brainerd Tribune, 21 August 1875, p. 1, c. 6)

21 August

The Brainerd and St.
Vincent Branches to
be Built at Once!
_____

“RISE AND SING!”
_____


F. R. Delano, Esq., returned from New York this morning, where he went in company with Messrs. Geo. L. Recker, Samuel S. Broad and T. B. Campbell to meet with the full Board of Directors, and the representatives of the Dutch bondholders of the First Division of the St. Paul & Pacific Company.
The result of the meeting was an agreement upon a basis of settlement of all pending litigation and differences as follows: The foreclosure suits are to be withdrawn, following which the St. Vincent extension line will be withdrawn from the Receiver.
Work will then—that is to say, within the shortest possible time—be commenced for completion of the line including the Brainerd Branch, sixty miles, already graded and four and a half miles ironed; the St. Vincent branch, from the northern terminus of the completed section to St. Vincent; and the newly projected, connection from the main line terminus at Breckenridge, thirty-two miles to Glyndon, the southern end of the ironed part of the St. Vincent extension.
Briefly, this agreement is to provide a completed line from St. Paul up the Mississippi to Brainerd, and by way of the main line and all rail routes to St. Vincent on the British border, where it will be met by the completed branch of the Canadian Pacific from Winnipeg, (Fort Garry).
Better yet, the agreement, is to build, finish and put in operation these lines this fall, and there’s money enough pledged to do all that’s promised.—[St. Paul Dispatch.
This news seems almost too good to be true, and considering the numerous false reports heretofore circulated regarding the immediate completion of these branches, many are inclined to discredit its reliability. We await developments with almost breathless anxiety. Meantime, three cheers and a tiger for F. R. Delano, Brainerd’s best friend in the matter of the Brainerd Branch. (Brainerd Tribune, 21 August 1875, p. 1, c. 5)

Improving.


The injured in the late bridge disaster at this place are, we are glad to learn, improving very rapidly.
Dr. J. C. Lamb’s lip is nearly healed, though a few splinters of wood working out of the wound render it quite painful and compels him to keep a pretty “stiff upper-lip.” His bruises otherwise are greatly improved, and he is able to walk about quite comfortably.
Mr. Thirgart has also quit his bed, and will soon be a well man again.
Concerning Mr. Sawyer, of Duluth, we clip from the Duluth Tribune: A. J. Sawyer is able to ride down to his store in a carriage, but he still has a very sore ankle which gives him a good deal of trouble. (Brainerd Tribune, 21 August 1875, p. 1, c. 6)

SEE: 27 July 1875

28 August
The Brainerd Tribune, in its undue excitement, says the Dispatch censured the Brainerd telegraph operator because he did not neglect his regular business and send us the news of the railroad accident at that point. The Dispatch knew the operator had no time to attend to such matters, and that he was forbidden from doing so, even if he had the leisure. The Dispatch simply sent a private telegram to the editor of the Tribune asking for the news, and would have been very glad to have paid him liberally for the service. The editor of the Tribune knows whether that message reached him promptly or not. If it did, then our information was incorrect, and the censure was unjustly bestowed under a misapprehension of facts. If it was not promptly delivered, as we now believe, then the remarks were correct. We asked nothing of the operator at Brainerd, save the discharge of his duties in delivering a private message. The editor of the Tribune may be perfectly satisfied to have telegraphic messages addressed to him, held at the will or whim of the operators, but the Dispatch regards telegraph operators as public servants, bound to transmit and deliver whatever is sent them. We pay for telegraphic service, and don’t propose to allow a common carrier to regulate our business.—[St. Paul Dispatch.
The message referred to did not reach us promptly, but we think the operator entirely excusable under the circumstances, as he had no carrier, and could not leave the office himself to deliver messages on that day, and in any event we think the attack of the Dispatch uncalled for and ungentlemanly in the extreme.
If we had received the message, we would have been very glad to have attended to the wants of the Dispatch, and do not ask or accept pay for such services, and shall consider it a pleasure to report news at any time to any of the dailies, when desired. At this time the thought occurred to us to send an account of the accident to the St. Paul and Minneapolis papers, but we then supposed, we know not why, that it was a duty of the operator, by virtue of his office to send an account. (Brainerd Tribune, 28 August 1875, p. 1, c. 4)

SEE: 02 January 1875
SEE: 29 June 1875
SEE: 27 July 1875
SEE: 08 August 1875

The Brainerd Branch Bubble.


The report last week that the Brainerd and St. Vincent Branches of the St. Paul and Pacific Railroad were to be built at once, has, like similar reports heretofore, proved a mere newspaper bubble. While in St. Paul we endeavored to get at the facts in the case, and as near as we can learn the only truth to the report this time is that the company has made a proposition to its bondholders to sell them the road and its franchises, which it is thought they will accept for the reasons that the foreclosure of their mortgage would thus be dispensed with, which is a big item, as the selling of the lands under the mortgage would submit the whole thing to taxation, which would be avoided by this transfer, and hence the statement of the Dispatch that, “The result of the meeting was an agreement upon a basis of settlement of all pending litigation and differences,” but it omitted to state that this proposition has yet to be submitted to the Dutch bondholders in Europe, and that under the most favorable circumstances work could not possibly be commenced on these branches this fall, much less to have them completed, while if they were on the ground and ready to begin work on them to-day the time is too short for their completion before winter. The one item of iron alone renders the feat impracticable, for there is not we are told sufficient iron in the State to complete the amount of road promised by the Dispatch, and it cannot be procured in time under any circumstances to complete them before the expiration of the grant on the 4th of March next. So that it can readily be seen that additional legislation will be necessary first.
It has, we believe, been held by the Supreme Court of the United States that the land under a similar grant did not revert to the United States government in case of non-fulfillment of its provisions, but that it falls to the State government for the completion of the road for which it was originally granted. In that case it will be seen that the consent of our legislature will also be a necessary adjunct to the “amicable settlement and immediate completion of these branches” reported by the Dispatch.
Of course there is little room for doubt that this proposition will be accepted, and that if required the necessary legislation will be had; but we will never again place any dependence upon any report that the Brainerd Branch is to be completed until we see the last rail laid and properly spiked. (Brainerd Tribune, 28 August 1875, p. 1, c. 5)

REWARD OFFERED.


The pocket-book of Jas. Peterkin, the engineer killed in the bridge disaster here in July last, was by some means lost at the time of the wreck, and contained some valuable papers and some money. If the finder will leave the book and papers with the editor of this paper he will be entirely welcome to the money and liberally rewarded besides, and positively no questions will be asked. (Brainerd Tribune, 28 August 1875, p. 1, c. 6)

SEE: 22 February 1873
SEE: 27 July 1875
SEE: 04 August 1875
SEE: 06 August 1875
SEE: 04 September 1875

04 September

REWARD OFFERED.


The pocket-book of P. [Pervis] J. [James] Peterkin, the engineer killed in the bridge disaster here in June last, was by some means lost at the time of the wreck, and contained some valuable papers and some money; also, two certificates of deposit on the first National Bank, St. Paul, bearing the following numbers and dates:
No. 17144, Feb. 25, 1875—$800.00
No. 17647, July 19, 1875,—$300.00
Payment upon which has been stopped. Any person returning the above certificates to me will be liberally rewarded, and positively no questions will be asked.
T. H. BRADY,
P. O. Box 74. Brainerd, Minn.
(Brainerd Tribune, 04 September 1875, p. 1, c. 6)

SEE: 22 February 1873
SEE: 27 July 1875
SEE: 04 August 1875
SEE: 06 August 1875
SEE: 28 August 1875

Dr. J. C. Lamb, of Watervliet, Mich., who was injured in the bridge disaster here in July last, started for home yesterday nearly a well man. He desires us to thank the people of Brainerd who extended favors to him during his stay here, for their attention and kindness. He says many citizens of Brainerd will be ever remembered by him with the warmest feeling of gratitude and friendship. (Brainerd Tribune, 04 September 1875, p. 1, c. 7)

SEE: 27 July 1875

The Northern Pacific Railroad Co. owns seventy locomotives, which is more than is needed for the present, hence, ten of them have been transferred to the Milwaukee and St. Paul road, and six to the West Wisconsin. (Brainerd Tribune, 04 September 1875, p. 4, c. 2)

10 September
Yesterday evening the locomotive that went down in the wreck of the bridge was finally drawn out of the river and up the steep bluff to the track, and taken to the machine shops. It was a very tedious process; a force of men have been working at it for a week or two. The bluff on the west side of the river was graded to an inclined plane, and a track laid down to the rusty and battered monster, and after getting her jacked up on to her feet again and squared about on the temporary track, a couple of powerful locomotives on top of the hill slowly and sadly drew her up to a proper level once more. She was a sad looking sight, and as she was slowly drawn across the fearful chasm on the new bridge, and up through the city, everyone stopped and gazed on her remains, but spoke not a word as it were. She was enabled to proceed on her own wheels, by the use of care, but the boiler, the heavy frame, and the skeleton of the cab, (wherein stood the noble Peterkin and his gallant fireman, Grandon) were all that remained and they were covered with mud and rust. The sight, on that quiet Sabbath evening, as she proceeded through the town at funereal gait, was indeed a sad reminder to those who still hear that crash ringing in their ears, and whose eyes still behold the awful wreck and the remains of their noble friends, who exchanged worlds in the twinkling of an eye. (Brainerd Tribune, 11 September 1875, p. 1, c. 6)

NOTE: Sometime after the locomotive was hauled up the west bank of the river, the temporary track was extended out into the river and pilings were driven as a base for supporting a platform from which a steam crane was used to haul the wreckage of the cars, etc. from the river and up the west bank. Those oddly shaped pilings remain in the river and can be seen today.

SEE: 27 July 1875

11 September

ENTERPRISE.


The Brainerd disaster brought all energies to the front. Supt. Sullivan and his men worked like heroes. The terrible break occurred July 27th, and on August 11th a strong, new bridge was ready for the usual trains. Of the fifteen intervening days, five were consumed in collecting materials and men. The latter especially were far to seek. Thunder Bay, and even Winnipeg, contributed skilled artisans. When everything was on the ground, the work went on day and night. In ten days the bridge was built. The hammers were heard driving home the spikes until within a few minutes of the crossing of the first train. For its purpose, the bridge is an admirable structure; there is not a quiver as the monstrous weight rumbles over it, yet it is only a temporary expedient. Being a trestle bridge, it cannot withstand the breaking up of the ice in the Spring, so this Winter it is to be replaced by a truss bridge.
It is no more than fair to the officials of the road, to state that the old bridge that gave way, was one that had long survived its expected term of service. Had it not been for the great failure, this and other wooden bridges would have yielded to permanent stone structures, rendering such accident impossible. (Minneapolis Tribune, 11 September 1875, p. 2)

NORTHERN PACIFIC.

DOES THE ROAD PAY?


It is easily seen that all this thronging population cannot do without the railroad. But what does the railroad say? Does it pay? Let me present a few facts.
There have recently been two disasters upon the Northern Pacific—the breaking of the bridge at Brainerd and the burning of a baggage car. The latter involved a loss of some $10,000; the former, including payment for wrecked freight and the building of a new bridge, footed up to about $200,000. There was no mean higgling over accounts presented, the whole was paid for in cash. (Minneapolis Tribune, 11 September 1875, p. 2)

25 September
At noon everyday there is always an hour’s pleasant excitement at the Headquarters Hotel; both trains eat dinner at this point, or rather the passengers on the trains do—all except those who carry a handkerchief full of doughnuts along when they travel; that class seem to take a fiendish delight in sitting at the car windows chewing doughnuts and making mouths at the hotel keepers. (Brainerd Tribune, 25 September 1875, p. 1, c. 7)

WE have heard, by way of the town pump or otherwise, that Mr. Thompson, of the N. P. Land Department here, is a candidate for the office of Register of Deeds. Friend Thompson is an efficient man and popular. Next. (Brainerd Tribune, 25 September 1875, p. 1, c. 7)

30 September

Northern Pacific.


NEW YORK, Sept. 30.—At a meeting of the bondholders of the Northern Pacific railroad the report of the purchasing committee was read and approved. The report of the receiver, G. W. Cass, was also read and unanimously adopted, after which the following directors were elected for the coming year: Edwin M. Lewis, Johnston Livingston, J. K. Moorhead, J. N. Hutchinson, George Stark, John M. Dennison, George W. Cass, C. B. Wright, Joseph Dilworth, B. P. Cheney, Charlemagne Tower, Fred. K. Billings, J. Gregory Smith. The directors elected C. B. Wright, president, George Stark, vice president, and Jay Cooke, financial agent. (Brainerd Tribune, 02 October 1875, p. 1, c. 5)

01 October

OFFICE OF RECEIVER,
NORTHERN PACIFIC RAILROAD.
_________________

SPECIAL NOTICE.
_________________


NEW YORK, Oct. 1, 1875.

ON Sept 29th, 1875, the undersigned turned over to the Purchasing Committee, the Northern Pacific Railroad, and its business, and from and after that day the Receiver makes no accounts and incurs no indebtedness or liabilities to employees, or others on account of said railroad, property, or business.
GEO. W. CASS,
RECEIVER.
(Brainerd Tribune, 02 October 1875, p. 1, c. 3)

02 October

Sudden Death of Ira Spaulding.


The following from a Washington paper of Oct. 4 was kindly forwarded us by letter of same date by Thos. H. Canfield, who says: “The gentleman referred to I think must be Gen’l. Spaulding, the first resident engineer of the N. P. R. R., in Minnesota, and who had charge of the construction from Komoka to Red River, and who resided in Brainerd:”
PHILADELPHIA, Oct. 3.—An unknown man died suddenly on a passenger train of the Philadelphia and Reading railroad on Saturday morning. He had numerous papers in his possession, showing that he was largely interested in the Northern Pacific railroad. The name of Ira Spaulding was engraved on his watch. The deceased was apparently 60 years of age. (Brainerd Tribune, 09 October 1875, p. 1, c. 5)

SEE: 29 February 1872
SEE: 22 June 1872
SEE: 14 December 1872

09 October

To the Electors of Crow Wing
County.


GENTLEMEN: I hereby announce myself as an independent candidate at the coming election for the office of Register of Deeds, of your county, for the ensuing two years. Of my ability to fill the office it is unnecessary for me to speak, and I will only say that if elected it shall be my endeavor to perform its duties faithfully, carefully, courteously and impartially. Believing the office to be one in which party or politics should be in no way interested, being no politician myself, I respectfully submit the matter to your decision at the polls.
Respectfully, your humble, obedient servant, FRANK B. THOMPSON.
(Brainerd Tribune, 09 October 1875, p. 1, c. 4)

Northern Pacific Railroad Directory.


Charles B. Wright, of Philadelphia, President; Geo. Stark, of New Hampshire, Vice President; Samuel Wilkeson, of New York, Secretary; Geo. E. Beebe, of New York, Treasurer; George Gray, of Minnesota, General Counsel; Charles W. Mead, of St. Paul, General Manager.

SEE: 1869
SEE: 09 March 1870
SEE: 06 July 1872
SEE: 11 November 1876
SEE: 09 December 1876
SEE: 23 April 1881
SEE: 31 December 1882

MINNESOTA AND DAKOTA DIVISIONS.


R. M. Newport, of Brainerd, Assistant Treasurer; James B. Power, of Brainerd, Agent Land Department. (Brainerd Tribune, 09 October 1875, p. 1, c. 5)

NEWPORT:
SEE: 17 August 1872
SEE: 26 April 1873
SEE: 12 December 1874
SEE: 19 December 1874
SEE: 29 January 1876
SEE: 19 February 1876
SEE: 03 June 1876
SEE: 25 April 1877
SEE: 06 June 1877
SEE: 09 June 1877
SEE: 14 June 1877
SEE: 06 October 1877
SEE: 07 February 1880
SEE: 17 February 1881
SEE: 26 February 1881
SEE: 17 March 1881
SEE: 09 April 1881
SEE: 13 April 1881
SEE: 30 April 1881
SEE: 19 May 1881
SEE: 23 July 1881
SEE: 11 February 1882
SEE: 18 February 1882
SEE: 30 July 1882
SEE: 05 February 1917

POWER:
SEE: 05 October 1871
SEE: 01 April 1873
SEE: 03 May 1873

SEE: 01 December 1873
SEE: 27 December 1873
SEE: 10 January 1874
SEE: 06 June 1874
SEE: 12 September 1874
SEE: 28 November 1874
SEE: 06 February 1875
SEE: 20 March 1875
SEE: 12 April 1875
SEE: 07 August 1875
SEE: 19 February 1876
SEE: 22 July 1876
SEE: 07 October 1876
SEE: 25 April 1877
SEE: 14 June 1877
SEE: 04 August 1877
SEE: 06 October 1877
SEE: 23 October 1877
SEE: 02 November 1877
SEE: 18 June 1878
SEE: 20 July 1878
SEE: 06 August 1878
SEE: 21 September 1878
SEE: 28 September 1878
SEE: 10 May 1879
SEE: 05 July 1879
SEE: 30 July 1879
SEE: 27 September 1879
SEE: 18 February 1880
SEE: 21 February 1880
SEE: 28 August 1880
SEE: 31 August 1880
SEE: 04 September 1880
SEE: 16 September 1880
SEE: 09 October 1880
SEE: 09 December 1880
SEE: 25 December 1880
SEE: 17 February 1881
SEE: 21 February 1881
SEE: 26 February 1881
SEE: 09 April 1881
SEE: 13 April 1881
SEE: 23 April 1881
SEE: 19 May 1881
SEE: 11 June 1881
SEE: 23 July 1881
SEE: 01 September 1881
SEE: 03 October 1881
SEE: 06 December 1881
SEE: 30 July 1882
SEE: 02 August 1882
SEE: 05 February 1917

16 October
It is rumored, upon what seems to be good authority, that C. W. Mead has resigned the position of General Manager of the Northern Pacific Railroad, which he has so long and honorably filled. This, if true, will be generally regretted along the line of the Road. (Brainerd Tribune, 16 October 1875, p. 1, c. 7)

19 October
O. C. Green, Esq., of St. Paul, Sup’t. of Telegraph on the N. P. R. R. and L. S. & M. R. R. was on the western bound train, Tuesday. (Brainerd Tribune, 23 October 1875, p. 1, c. 6)

21 October
THE remains of Richard Grandon, the fireman killed here in July last in the bridge disaster, were disinterred Thursday by the Odd Fellows Lodge, and forwarded to his friends in Omaha, Neb. (Brainerd Tribune, 23 October 1875, p. 1, c. 7)

SEE: 27 July 1875
SEE: 04 August 1875
SEE: 06 August 1875
SEE: 31 October 1875

22 October
A party of N. P. R. R. officials, consisting of Geo. Stark, Vice President; Gen’l. Jno. M. Dennison, Director; C. W. Mead, General Manager; W. S. Alexander, General Freight and Ticket Ag’t.; J. H. Sullivan, Superintendent, and Thos. H. Canfield, President of Lake Superior & Puget Sound Co., arrived in Brainerd yesterday noon by special train, and passed the afternoon by looking over their interests here, proceeding west this morning. Their tour is one of inspection, and if any changes in the management of the road or otherwise occur it will be after the return of Gen’ls. Stark and Dennison to New York. It is their aim to have work resumed on the construction of the line west, as projected, at the earliest possible period, and to this end are they striving. Their faith in its early completion is strong, which will of necessity largely enhance their success. (Brainerd Tribune, 23 October 1875, p. 1, c. 6)

THE contract was completed yesterday at Duluth with parties from Hastings, Minn., for the building of the piers and abutments of a bridge across the Mississippi at this point, work to be commenced at once, and to be completed on or before the first of next January. They are to be built of Duluth granite. (Brainerd Tribune, 23 October 1875, p. 1, c. 7)

30 October

Another Step Downward.


A change in the management of the affairs of the Northern Pacific Railroad took place this week. The resignation of C. W. Mead, Gen’l. Manager, was accepted, and that office merged with the office of General Freight and Ticket Agent, and W. S. Alexander placed in control.
J. H. Sullivan, the Superintendent, came on to the road with Mr. Mead, and did not feel like remaining after he left, and consequently also resigned and Mr. H. A. Towne, the Sup’t. of Machinery, was appointed in his place and performs the duties of both offices.
The employees on the Dakota Division have been reduced in number one-half, and a reduction in salaries and wages throughout has been made. Trains are to be withdrawn from the Dakota Division within ten days, and a new time table goes into effect on this Division on Wednesday next, passenger trains stopping overnight here. In fact everything has been cut down to the very lowest possible notch—a good deal, we fear, upon the penny wise and pound foolish system.
However, it is to be presumed that the directors understand their business, and we can only acquiesce and be content, though we do not think such measures are for the best interests of the road, and we would if we could induce them to believe us, but that they probably will not do.
The appointments made are excellent good ones, and perfectly satisfactory to everybody, so far as we know. Mr. Towne is a gentleman in the fullest sense of the word, and is well liked as a citizen as well as in the position he has occupied heretofore, and he is in every way capable of filling with credit to himself and profit to the Company the offices to which he has been promoted; and what we have said of Mr. Towne may be said with equal propriety of Mr. Alexander, the new Manager.
Mr. Sullivan was honored last night by a grand ball at Bly’s Hall, gotten up by his many friends here in honor of his departure to-day from among us, at which we are informed a very pleasant time was enjoyed. Official duties prevented our attendance, which we regretted exceedingly. Both Mr. Mead and Mr. Sullivan take with them many kind wishes for their future welfare, and strong hopes are entertained by many that their departure is only temporary. (Brainerd Tribune, 30 October 1875, p. 1, c. 5)

31 October

Odd Fellow's Funeral—
Burial of Richard Grandon.


[As will be seen from the following taken from the Omaha (Neb.) BEE of the 1st inst., the remains of Richard Grandon, deceased, who was a member of Wildey Lodge, I. O O. F., No. 37, of Brainerd, reached his friends and relatives in that city in safety, and were there consigned in due form to their last resting place in accordance with the plans of his brethren here, and in a manner highly gratifying and satisfactory to this Lodge.—Ed.]

_____


Yesterday afternoon at 2 o'clock the Odd Fellows of this city consigned the remains of the late Richard Grandon to their last sad resting place, the ceremonies being of a most imposing and solemn character.
The deceased was formerly a citizen of this place. He was a brother-in-law to Mrs. Mary Grandon, and he has a brother in Texas and one in Utah.
He was about 30 years of age, and was a locomotive fireman by occupation. He was killed July 27, 1875, by the falling of a train through the railroad bridge across the Mississippi river at Brainerd, Minnesota, in which accident several were killed and drowned.
When Grandon was found he was not quite dead; being conscious long enough to request that he should be buried at Omaha, among his friends in the Catholic cemetery, which request was refused, as he was a member of the Order of Odd Fellows, a secret society.
At his death-bed he was surrounded by Odd Fellows, who did all in their power to alleviate his sufferings, until they were ended by death. His remains were placed in a metallic casket, and arrived here last week.
The funeral yesterday took place from the undertaking rooms of Coroner Gish, the Rev. Leroy F. Britt officiating.
The Union Pacific band headed the long procession; then came the members of the several lodges in regalia, followed by the hearse and a large concourse of sorrowing friends and brothers in carriages. The line proceeded to Prospect Hill cemetery, where were deposited the remains of the deceased, who was known as honest Dick Grandon among his acquaintances. (Brainerd Tribune, 13 November 1875, p. 1, c. 5)

SEE: 27 July 1875
SEE: 04 August 1875
SEE: 06 August 1875
SEE: 21 October 1875


06 November
THE Northern Pacific has sold one hundred and fifty flat cars to the St. Paul and Pacific. (Brainerd Tribune, 06 November 1875, p. 1, c. 7)

THE hotel registers at the Headquarters and the Leland House are well filled now-a-days. The passenger trains stop overnight here. (Brainerd Tribune, 06 November 1875, p. 1, c. 7)

13 November
THE first lot of stone for the new R. R. bridge arrived here last week, and a crew of men are at work clearing away for the foundations. (Brainerd Tribune, 13 November 1875, p. 1, c. 7)

16 November

HONOR TO WHOM HONOR IS DUE.
_____

J. H. Sullivan, the Retiring Superin-
tendent of the N. P. R. R.,
the Recipient of Rich
Presents.
_____

ALSO, A HIGHLY COMPLIMENTARY BALL.
_____


The event of the season transpired at the Headquarters, in this city, on Tuesday evening, the 16th inst. It was opened by the presentation to Mr. John H. Sullivan by the employees of the N. P. R. R. of the following rich testimonials of their very high appreciation of their retiring Superintendent:—
A fine gold watch and heavy neck-chain and a beautiful solitaire diamond pin. The watch was a Howard hunting case and bore the following inscription inside the case, “J. H. Sullivan, presented by the employees of the N. P. R. R., Nov. 16th, 1875,” and the beautifully engraved monogram, “J. H. S.,” on the outside. They were purchased in New York at a cost of $650. John B. Davidson, Esq., who for a long time has filled the position of paymaster of the Road, was selected by the boys to make the presentation, which he did with the following very appropriate address:
MR. SULLIVAN:—As you have severed your connection with the N. P. R. R. and us, we have assembled here to-night to express our regret that the necessity has arisen which prompted you to such a step, and at the same time to wish you God speed in all your future undertakings. During the years in which we have been associated together, you as Superintendent and we as employees of the several departments of the Road, our relations have been of the the most pleasant nature, and the lapse of time has served but the more closely to bind us the one to the other. The ties that have been formed during those years are now to be rudely snapped asunder, but the friendship engendered by our intercourse will remain. To your uniform kindness and courtesy in the discharge of the duties of your position, your keen appreciation of the difficulties under which we, in our several avocations, have at times labored, and your earnest endeavor at all times to lighten rather than to impose burdens, is this result mainly to be attributed. We will miss your familiar face from amongst us, but it may be some satisfaction to you to know, while amid other scenes, and occupied by other duties, that the respect and esteem of the entire working force of the N. P. follow you to your new sphere of usefulness. In token of the sincerity of these expressions your late co-works have procured this diamond pin, watch and chain, and honored me in selecting me to present the same to you. This, I now, with great pleasure do; asking you in the name of those you leave behind you to accept these gifts, to cherish them, and as from time to time you look on them, to read in them in unmistakable characters, the assurance that our best wishes for your continued welfare, prosperity and happiness will follow you and abide with you wherever God in his providence may cast your lot.
The affair was a complete surprise to Mr. Sullivan, who had only been informed that he was invited to a “Complimentary Ball,” and he was scarcely able to control his feelings much less to give them expression in words, and he only said, “Gentlemen, you know my feelings better than I can express them,” and the truthfulness of the remark and the eloquence of his actions, which spoke volumes, was felt by all present, and a gleam of satisfaction passed over their countenances, followed by a sort of indescribable feeling of appropriateness.
Immediately following the presentation the spacious dining hall of the Headquarters Hotel was found in readiness, and the enchanting music of Seibert’s band, of St. Paul, fell upon the willing ears of the hundreds who had gathered from every town on the line, and they were soon lost in the merry whirl. Among those in attendance from abroad we noticed E. B. Chambers, of the Fargo Times, and wife; W. B. Nickles, of the Red River Star, and lady, and Miss Connie. C. W. Mead, the retiring Manager, and Mr. W. T. Williams, the Purchasing Agent of the Road; E. H. Davie, wife and daughter, P. W. Kennedy and wife, J. S. Rogers and wife, A. T. Fitzpatrick, F. J. E. Sweetman, and E. S. Tyler, of Fargo, D. T.; H. G. Finkie, Dr. Jno. Kurtz and Jas. Sharp, of Moorhead; Judge J. S. Carvelle and M. H. Kellogg, of Bismarck, D. T.; C. B. Jordan and wife, of Wadena, Minn.; and D. Willard, of Aitkin, Minn.
The dance was decidedly the very best and happiest affair that has occurred in Brainerd, and only drew to a close at an early hour the following morning, when the happy participants hied them away home with the universal expression of complete satisfaction.
Mr. Sullivan took his final leave of Brainerd and the Northwest on Thursday morning, and departed for his home in Excello, Macon county, Mo., and dame rumor has fixed a day in the near future when he is to take to himself a life partner, after the custom of his fathers. May joy, peace and happiness be his new role, and his partner be worthy of him, is the earnest wish of the subscriber. (Brainerd Tribune, 20 November 1875, p. 1, c. 6)

NOTE: M. H. Kellogg died at the Battle of the Little Big Horn in June 1876. He was accompanying Custer as a special correspondent for the Bismarck Tribune.

F. J. E. Sweetman, the very diminutive conductor of the Dakota Division, has taken winter quarters at Col. Weed’s, and has accepted a commission under Col. Frost. (Brainerd Tribune, 20 November 1875, p. 1, c. 7)

23 November

A Mail and Express Car Burned.


On Tuesday night last, at about 11:15 P. M., the mail and express car bound west and lying at the depot here was burned, together with a large Canadian mail and some U. S. paper mail. The fire was first discovered by the express route agent, who had just gone to the car to go to bed. There was no express matter in the car, and a very little baggage, which was saved. The fire when discovered was breaking out from the mail room, which was locked, and is supposed to have originated in the mail bags, of which there was a number, falling or being left too near the stove, the room being small. The statement in the account telegraphed from here to the Pioneer-Press, that the mail burned was in charge of mail route agent O. J. Johnson, is an error, as Mr. Johnson’s run was at the time on the east end, and he was asleep in his car and knew nothing of the fire until the following morning, and though the article does not attach blame to Mr. Johnson, it misstates the facts and should be corrected. The fire was purely accidental, and no one is or can be blamed in the matter. (Brainerd Tribune, 27 November 1875, p. 1, c. 5)

27 November

Northern Pacific Railroad.


Rapid progress is making, says the Philadelphia World, in the adjustment of Northern Pacific affairs under the plan recently adopted. Out of 30 millions of bonds originally issued, 23 millions have been returned to the Farmers’ Loan & Trust Co., of New York, to be exchanged for preferred stock, and an additional two millions, making 25 millions in all, were canceled last week by deeds for lands of the company. The purchases they represent have been made during the last two months. The development of the region adjacent to the western terminus has been rapid. The Pacific Mail Steamship Co., has already put on a line between San Francisco and Puget Sound, terminating at Tacoma five steamers a month from San Francisco, and three a day to Victoria, British Columbia and Sound ports. The tonnage of Puget Sound is now greater than that of San Francisco, a fact attributable mainly to the magnitude of the lumber interests.
Says the Pioneer-Press: A late letter from New York to a friend in this city, amongst other things, says that there is every probability the work of reconstruction of the Northern Pacific railroad will be commenced as early in the spring as the weather will permit; indeed it is understood that the money for building the first 25 miles west of Bismarck is already promised. It is further stated, in the letter in question, that the president of the new company, Mr. C. B. Wright, is determined to push the road to completion at as early a day as possible, and to that end is giving his undivided attention to the work. No one, as yet, has been appointed in the place of Gen. Manager C. W. Mead, the late manager, who, it is understood has tendered his resignation; but it is thought that R. M. Newport, Esq., the present assistant treasurer, will receive the appointment. (Brainerd Tribune, 27 November 1875, p. 1, c. 5)

NORTHERN Pacific Railroad people appear to be highly pleased at the appointment of Mr. H. A. Towne, as superintendent of their great road. One of them tells us that he’s the right man in the right place.—Pioneer-Press.
Correct, Mr. P.-P. (Brainerd Tribune, 27 November 1875, p. 1, c. 5)

10 December
AMONG the bills of interest to Minnesota and the west introduced into the national senate yesterday, was one to extend the time for the completion of the Northern Pacific railroad. It allows the company ten years additional time in which to build and equip the road. (Brainerd Tribune, 11 December 1875, p. 1, c. 7)

11 December
HARRY BRINTNELL, one of the most gentlemanly conductors on the Northern Pacific, has severed his connection with the road, and is going into trade at some point west. (Brainerd Tribune, 11 December 1875, p. 1, c. 6)

THE directors of the Northern Pacific railroad are to meet in New York on the 15th inst. (Brainerd Tribune, 11 December 1875, p. 1, c. 7)

THE stone in the Hinckley quarry has proved utterly valueless and has been abandoned, and it has been decided to build the abutments of the bridge here with stone as far as what stone is here will build it, and complete them with wood. (Brainerd Tribune, 11 December 1875, p. 1, c. 7)

15 December

THE NORTHERN PACIFIC.
_____

No Alliance Sought With the Southern Pacific—
What Mr. Jay Cooke Says of the Road.

Philadelphia Letter of 15th to New York Tribune.


Mr. Jay Cooke, who still takes a warm interest in the affairs of the Northern Pacific railroad, says that there will be no effort on the part of that company to secure aid from Congress by joining hands with Col. Thomas Scott’s Texas Pacific project. It appears that Col. Scott is confident of his ability to push his scheme through on its merits, and that the Northern Pacific managers, while not opposing it, are not seeking an alliance. Mr. Cooke is just as confident as ever of the future success of the railroad which swallowed up his great fortune and brought him to bankruptcy. He says it now occupies the proudest position of any road in the country, being entirely free from debt, its bonds having been converted into preferred stock. Both ends of the road earn a monthly surplus over running expenses which amounts to about $60,000.
The value of the company’s land grant, Mr. Cooke says, is far greater than even the directors themselves imagine. The completion of the last 200 miles in Dakota gave the company 200,000 acres more than are contained in the whole state of Massachusetts. The reservation of the alternate sections belonging to the government for actual settlers, in tracts of 80 acres, or 160 to soldiers, enables the company to virtually offer the settler who buys a farm of it another farm adjoining as a free gift. The settler who buys 80 acres from the company has only to build a house on the adjoining 80 acres to own the whole 160. If he was a soldier he gets 320 acres by the same process. Mr. Cooke argues that the strict provisions of the law to prevent speculators getting possession of any land within the limit of the grant will eventually result in thickly populating the region through which the Northern Pacific runs, and as a consequence, will produce a large local business for the road. The friends of Mr. Jay Cooke will be glad to learn that he is in excellent health and spirits. (Brainerd Tribune, 25 December 1875, p. 1, c. 5)

18 December

The Brainerd Bridge.


The directors of the Northern Pacific now in session in New York have telegraphed orders to the authorities here to procure granite from Sauk Rapids sufficient to build piers of the Brainerd Bridge up to high water mark, and complete them with wooden trestle work, which will be removed in the spring after the ice has gone out and replaced with stone, as first intended. On this trestle work the bridge proper will be built according to the original plans. The granite will be shipped by way of St. Paul, a distance of over three hundred miles, where if the Brainerd and Sauk Rapids road was open the distance would be less than seventy miles. The extra expense for shipping the stone by the present route will exceed $5,000, one eighth of the cost of completing the Sauk Rapids Road. (Brainerd Tribune, 18 December 1875, p. 1, c. 6)

22 December

L. S. & M. Railroad.


The Pioneer-Press of the 22d inst., in a lengthy article digesting the report of President Ilsley on this road, says:
“The receipts of the road for the year 1875 will be about $525,000, while the expenditures will be about the same, leaving nothing to provide for former liabilities or the interest on bonds.”
This is certainly a bad showing, especially in view of the fact that under the management of the Northern Pacific during the term of its control of that road it paid handsome profits, as the following figures from the report of the Railroad Commissioners for the ten months ending April 30th, 1874, will show:

Gross earnings,—$573,684.35
Total expenditure,—$340,620.47
Net earnings,—$233,063.88

This, it will be seen, does not include the months of May and June, claimed to be the best months in the year, but does include the winter months, when the lake traffic is closed.
The report states that the expenditures have been large on account of renewals of tracks and bridges, but even that would not seem to justify the expenditure of such an amount. The expenditures in ‘73 and ‘74 were thought to be extraordinarily large, owing to the large amount of repairing done on the rolling stock, but the passenger travel and freights over this road were supposed to be far greater in ‘75 than either of those years, and this showing is certainly a surprise. (Brainerd Tribune, 25 December 1875, p. 1, c. 6)

31 December
LOUIS N. GADBOIS, telegraph operator at Fargo, D. T., and formerly of Brainerd, committed suicide about 2 o’clock on Friday evening of last week by shooting himself in the head. He lived until the next morning at about 5 o’clock. The act was committed under temporary mental aberration, and the the poor fellow begged of his friends to save him when he realized what he had done. His father and brother, who reside in St. Paul, went west Tuesday to receive his remains. (Brainerd Tribune, 08 January 1876, p. 1, c. 7)

1876
08 January
SICK.—Conductor Wm. Doyle has had a very severe attack of paralysis of the bowels and lower limbs, and for a time his life was almost despaired of, but thanks to the very skillful treatment of Dr. Rosser and good nursing, he is in a fair way for recovery. (Brainerd Tribune, 08 January 1876, p. 1, c. 7)

19 January
THE following resolution was passed by the Northern Pacific Board of Directors, at a meeting held Jan. 19th, 1876:
Resolved. That any purchaser of lands from the Northern Pacific Railroad Co., which have not been certified, may, if he chooses to do so procure the same to be certified from the proper officers, by paying the costs thereof, and this Company will repay to him the amount of such costs, with interest from the date thereof. (Brainerd Tribune, 29 January 1876, p. 1, c. 4)

22 January

BLY’S MILL.
_____

A Visit to the Mill that Eber H. Bly
Built—And What We Saw There.
_____


In response to an invitation the other day, the writer piled himself into a vehicle, with two or three other gentlemen of elegant leisure, and went on a voyage of pleasure and discovery, with Bly’s steam saw mill at Boom Lake as the objective point in our travels. After a fine ride of half a mile from the town pump, we hauled up “furninst” the north-east end of the new mill and a busy scene. Upon arriving, the mill, just for the moment, was enjoying a panicked condition—occasioned, as we learned, by the band getting off the fly-wheel, or the bull-wheel slipping an eccentric, or the saw-dust conductor getting its mouth too full for utterance, or something of the sort. We only had time, however, to play brave, and go round feeling of this thing and that, and to carry the idea among the workmen about the mammoth “sawery” that we knew all about such matters, and had just got along to that part of the thing where the most business was done in a given period, when the score of workmen suddenly distributed themselves, and then something “broke loose,” like. Everything that was circular commenced revolving, everything that was round commenced rolling; straight things commenced going endwise, square things commenced bobbing, and every thing that could, commenced howling. About this time we commenced getting scared, and was afraid to move or even wink, for fear we should, in the twinkling of an eye, be transformed into a thousand feet of common boards; as the thought of such an ultimatum flashed through our mind, we didn’t care half so much about being ground up into that kind of a “bill of lumber,” as we did about being sold afterwards at the insignificant sum of thirteen dollars. One of the generous workmen, seeing that we didn’t seem to hanker after a steam saw mill—not till we became a “little useder to it”—kindly took us by the slack of the pants and deposited us in a place of safety, just in time so that we didn’t obstruct the passage of the log that slid along on a long sliding thing. This act of kindness also prevented the mill being clogged up by an ordinary newspaper correspondent, and a waste of time on the part of the workmen—we felt extremely thankful for this, because, where a mill is engaged in sawing out all the mammoth timber for the new railroad bridge across the Mississippi river at this point, to take the place of the old one that broke down last summer, it would have been a ridiculous thing for us to do, to interfere in the grand work. And this just reminds us that the new mill is not only a proud monument to the enterprise and energy of Mr. E. H. Bly, in the way of a general lumber producer, but that the contract of immense-sized timber for the structure above referred to, is being handsomely carried forward, notwithstanding the difficulties naturally attendant upon an undertaking of the kind at this season of the year. The monster Norway pines—from twenty to sixty feet in length and squaring from ten to twenty inches—are being put through with but slight delays, notwithstanding they are frozen hard as a stone, and more difficult to manufacture in this condition than oak itself. The mill has been placed in the finest condition for winter work, the crew selected with care, so that everything moves off grandly within, though it may blow ever so cold without. All the modern appliances have been put in, and it is interesting in the extreme to watch the systematic manufacture of lumber and timber going on. Aside from the main saws, there are board edgers, adjustable rip-saws—to saw the boards into any desired width—slab-saws, to transform the slabs into stove wood, sawdust conductors, a log-hauling bull wheel, a railroad to take the products from the mill to the yard, and dear knows what all. In short, it is a good thing—a big thing—and an institution that is as much of a pride to our young city as it is a credit to the indomitable owner. Bly is a brick! and that is all there is about it.
We feel called upon, however, to give him a piece of our mind about permitting our ice dealers to cut ice from the bosom of Boom Lake. The lake is his asylum for storing the immense supply of logs he is getting out this winter, for the use of the mill next summer; and, as the ice is two feet thick, you see after a layer is taken off, it must necessarily ensmall the area of the lake and enshallow it as well—hence, it will decrease the booming capacity thereof. Eh, Mr. B.? At all events we charge nothing for this timely warning, shrink or no shrink.
After a thorough look at the elephant, we returned homeward, well satisfied with ourself, with Bly’s steam mill, the world and everybody in it, and—the balance of poor fallen humanity. (Brainerd Tribune, Morris C. Russell, 22 January 1876, p. 1, c. 6)

THE PAY CAR on the Northern Pacific made its first regular trip in the Centennial year over the road this week in a new dress, in which it appears quite becomingly. It has been remodeled and repainted at the shops in this city, and is now a little beauty, and will be welcomed every month by the many employees on the line hereafter in a two-fold sense. We almost envy friend Edgerton the pleasant trips before him in his little palace. (Brainerd Tribune, 22 January 1876, p. 1, c. 6)

29 January

THE BLACK HILLS.
_____

THE GREAT RUSH VIA THE
NORTHERN PACIFIC RAIL-
ROAD ABOUT TO SET IN!
_____

Gold Fields Unparal-
leled, Both in Rich-
ness and Extent!
_____

INEXHAUSTIBLE RESOURCES OF THE
BLACK HILLS COUNTRY IN
_____

MINERALS, TIMBER, GRAZING,
AND AGRICULTURE!
_____

A Mild Climate and an
Abundance of Pure
Running Water.
_____

BEAUTIFUL AND HEALTHFUL COUNTRY,
_____

Parties and Expeditions
Carried Through to
Bismarck, Directly
and Quickly, by
_____

THE NORTHERN PACIFIC R. R.
_____

ONLY SEVENTY-TWO HOURS BY TEAM
FROM BISMARCK TO THE “HILLS.”
BEAUTIFUL ROUTE, SAFE CAMP-
ING PLACES, AND PLENTY OF
WOOD, WATER AND GRASS.
_____

THE ROUTE BY BISMARCK AND
THE NORTHERN PACIFIC, BY
FAR THE SAFEST, QUICK-
EST, AND MOST PLEAS-
ANT OF ALL OTHERS!
_____

HUNDREDS PREPARING TO RENDEZVOUS
AT BISMARCK, TO JOIN THE 1,500
MINERS ALREADY IN THE MINES.
_____

THREE YOUNG CITIES ALREADY
ESTABLISHED!
_____


Northern Pacific broadside advertising its route from Minnesota to Bismarck, then to the gold fields of Deadwood, Dakota Territory, ca. 1875.
Source: North Dakota State Historical Society
By the recent advices from Bismarck, the facts concerning the much talked of Black Hills country, we esteem have finally been reached. Being personally acquainted with the men who subscribe to the news and reports now coming in from the Hills, we place the fullest confidence in the statements now abroad over their signatures—as they are men of well known veracity and integrity, as well as being well educated, intelligent business men, who have lived neighbors with us ever since the commencement of the Northern Pacific railroad. It seems that as early as during the autumn months, the leading men of Bismarck conceived the idea of going to work systematically to discover the truth about the Black Hills, in all its phases and not to be satisfied to say yea or nay concerning what they believed to be true of them, until they knew all about the subject from personal knowledge after a thorough investigation of the subject and the Black Hills country as well. Accordingly, some two months since a party of the leading men of Bismarck, abundantly equipped for the journey, left for the new Eldorado for the purpose of learning what they, and the public at large so earnestly wanted to know—”the truth about the Black Hills.”
But little was heard from them after their departure, save by way of an occasional prairie ranger who came into Bismarck who had met the expedition en route, and reported them as going along finely and having a jolly good time generally on the trip. They were gone from Bismarck some five or six weeks, when their expected return became the all-absorbing topic of conversation, and eye-glasses from Fort A. Lincoln (across the Missouri River from Bismarck) came to be popular “arms,” as both citizens and soldiers spent hours gazing away off to the southwest, up the Little Heart Valley, in a laudable effort to see who could first discover the van of the returning party—in which were numbered friends of all remaining behind.
As the sun sank down one evening behind the western buttes, common in western Dakota, the cry came from the look out, “They come, they come!” and in a few hours more the little band so anxiously looked for were ensconced at the firesides kept warm for their reception, and they were received by the huzzas of all the villagers, while the cannon of the barracks pealed out a welcome to the adventurous explorers.
Soon as a little rest had refreshed the travelers, they gave to the public a brief account of their explorations and travels, which is something in substance as follows:
The had gone from Bismarck as nearly in a direct line for Harney’s Peak as practical, and after a most pleasant journey of seven easy days’ travel they arrived at Custer City, which is located a few miles south of Harney’s Peak, where they made their headquarters during their explorations throughout the mining regions. On their trip from Bismarck through they had encountered no Indians; there was no snow on the route, whatever; each night they camped on the banks of beautiful streams of water, with an abundance of wood and natural advantages for easy defense, in case of molestation by roving bands of redskins. Good grazing was found in the valleys—green and tender rushes, while the buffalo grass on the table lands afforded tolerable pasture, even in the winter months.
They found some twelve or fifteen hundred miners at work in the Hills, engaged in placer mining, and they did not find any who were not panning out—even by the rudest method—good wages, while a majority were making extraordinary wages, and some fabulous amounts of glittering nuggets of gold.
The party made a thorough and most exhaustive exploration of the ranges of country occupied by the miners, and much more besides. They found all the miners well supplied in all the necessaries of life which could be bought at reasonable prices from all who had brought a surplus, or supplies into the Hills to sell. Three cities have already been established, and each of them expect, by the middle of next summer to have a population respectively of from three to seven or eight thousand industrious inhabitants. The names of these embryo cities are, Custer City, four miles south of Harney’s Peak, Hill City, nine miles north of Harney’s Peak, and Golden City, eight miles east of Hill City. Hill City is at the junction of the roads leading to all parts of the Hills and will probably be the metropolis.
The richest mines are on Bear Butte Creek, 20 miles west of Bear Butte, and from that point on west to near Inyon Kura. They saw thirty-four dollars taken out of one pan, there being one nugget of $20, one of $2.50, and other smaller particles.
E. R. Collins, a Bismarck man, has a $2.50 nugget in his possession sent him by Jake Testers, a well known Montana miner.
The principal mining is being done on Spring Creek, where the party saw Spencer & Co., located near Golden City, take out one hundred and thirty-seven dollars, being the work of four men six hours. Next day the same force in the same time took out one hundred and twelve dollars. They had taken out thirty-six ounces of gold from a space twelve feet wide, thirty feet long and six feet deep.
Miners are coming in at the rate of seventy-five a day. They are coming from all localities and all directions.
The party having spent some three weeks exploring and looking over that noted country, bade the jolly miners adieu, and set out in their return, accompanied by the famous California miner and prairie guide, “California Joe,” who returned to Bismarck with the party—and who will pass through Brainerd the first of next week in company with several of the leading business men of Bismarck, en route for St. Paul.
They saw no Indians or traces of Indians en route to Bismarck. The trip was made in 72 hours traveling. They left the Black Hills at Rapid Creek pass, struck Bear Butte Creek at its mouth and took a bee line for Bismarck.
They believe the distance from Golden City to Bismarck, as traveled by them, to be 216 miles, but California Joe says twelve miles may be saved on this end of the route, making the distance to Hill City from Bismarck 204 miles, over the finest natural road, Joe says, he ever saw. The party were just seventy-two hours of travel in coming from the mines to Bismarck.
En route from Cheyenne teams require eighteen to twenty days, while the Bismarck party made the return trip in the dead of winter in seventy-two hours and a party made it last summer, with pack mules, in eight days.
Joe says no other route can be compared with the one from Bismarck. He says the Northern Pacific company had better turn their road around and butt the “dushed” thing against the Hills, where they will find all the business they can attend to for the next few years.
Joe returns with a train of thirty wagons in a few days.
The distance from Bismarck to Bear Lodge mines in 195 miles.
The weather in the Hills is reported splendid. There is no ice in the streams, while millions of ducks may now be found in Rapid Creek and other streams.
These comprise a bare outline of the facts concerning the richness and extent of the diggings in the Black Hills, and a proof that cannot be gainsaid that the route by the way of the Northern Pacific, with Bismarck as a fitting-out point, is the route of all routes to reach the Hills in the shortest time, and is the most economical, pleasant, and safest route to go. All that is necessary, is to give the facts to the outside world, as to the many and eminently superior advantages of the Northern Pacific route, and in a few weeks more thousands of people desirous of going to the Hills will be pouring this way—as safety, speed, conveniences and economy are the items that will be sought after by expeditions moving toward the gold fields, and the Northern Pacific route has now been proven to be ahead of all competing routes on every “count.”
We have authority for stating that the Northern Pacific company will be prepared any day to deliver expeditions and outfits through from St. Paul to Bismarck, in the shortest time and reasonable rates. So, all the eastern expeditions have to do is to come to St. Paul and put themselves in the care of the Northern Pacific folks—a more efficient, careful, obliging and thorough set of railroad men and gentlemen do not exist—and they will very quickly thereafter find themselves in Bismarck, in fine shape to start across to the Black Hills—the finest of all overland routes yet discovered—and in six easy days’ travel can commence panning out the precious metal for themselves.
Now that we have given, in the rough, all that need be said at this time concerning the mineral resources of the section of country under consideration and given something of a detailed description of the route and best manner to go about to get to the mining region, we shall conclude by a few words as to the general character of the Black Hills country, outside its mining or mineral features.
The country, as might be naturally supposed is, as a whole, a succession of hills, buttes, and valleys, with occasional parks and table lands. The entire country is well timbered, and the most luxurious and nutritious pasturage and rich soils is found in all the valleys. Sparkling steams, filled with choicest fish thread their way like ribbons of silver through every valley, while gushing springs pour out from the sides of the hills and mountains on every hand. There are many kinds of valuable deposits there, besides gold, which exists in endless quantities—such as gypsum, granite, and other deposits. The climate is of even temperature in all the districts fitted for agricultural pursuits, and is suited for the general production of all crops incident to our own State. Either agriculture, stock raising, lumbering or mining, can be carried on to an unlimited extent, which fact renders it a country quite unlike most other mineral regions, and hence, it offers the finest inducements to every branch of industry, and must speedily be filled with all classes of industrious producers. All productions, for the first, will find ready market at their own door, and the enviable and central geographical location of the Hills country, with its wealth in mineral, and other wonderful resources, must speedily, like an irresistible magnet, draw the thoroughfare of transportation to it from the old inhabited portions of the country—including the Northern Pacific—or rather a branch of it. For the reasons given, we expect to see a greater rush to the Black Hills gold regions, than to any yet developed in the history of the country; because all classes of industry can safely center there with a full assurance that their willing hands may readily find plenty of profitable employment, outside of the golden gulches. (Brainerd Tribune, 29 January 1876, p. 1, c.’s 5-7)

SUGGESTION.—Will some of our leading citizens move in the matter, prepare Bly’s Hall, and invite “California Joe,” and his party, from Bismarck; to a public reception, the evening they arrive here, and while doing honor to the stated guest and his friends, also talk Black Hills with Joe, and have a pleasant evening generally. (Brainerd Tribune, 29 January 1876, p. 1, c. 7)

THE Free Reading Room to be thrown open in a few days, through the liberality of the Railroad Company and its representatives here—in the spacious general office building of the Company, will certainly prove a most popular affair, and supply a want most grievously felt in this community. We learn that President Wright has consented, or ordered, that the pleasant and convenient room formerly occupied by Mr. Sanborn—first door to the left as you enter the building—be suitably fitted up, lighted and heated at the Company’s expense, and the citizens of Brainerd, without distinction, be cordially invited to come at any hour of the day or evening—as late as ten o’clock—and read all the popular papers and periodicals of the day. All of which is certainly most thoughtful and generous.—[Third T (Brainerd Tribune, 29 January 1876, p. 4, c. 1)

Col. R. M. Newport has been appointed Gen’l. Agent for Minnesota, for the St. Paul and Pacific Railroad Company. (Brainerd Tribune, 29 January 1876, p. 4, c. 1)

SEE: 17 August 1872
SEE: 26 April 1873
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SEE: 19 February 1876
SEE: 03 June 1876
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SEE: 30 July 1882
SEE: 05 February 1917

03 February
From the Third Termer Feb. 3rd.
ACCIDENT.—Mr. Wadham was severely injured at the Shops on Monday by the falling of a stick of wood on his head. Not dangerously injured. (Brainerd Tribune, 05 February 1876, p. 4, c. 2)

04 February
John A. McLean, Mayor of Bismarck, D. T., Col. Lounsberry, editor of the Bismarck Tribune, and J. W. Watson, a merchant of that place, accompanied by Lieut. Walker of Fort A. Lincoln, arrived at the Headquarters, this city, last evening, prepared with samples of the precious metal direct from the Black Hills, well authenticated reports of the richness of this new Eldorado, and many other overwhelming proofs of the reality of the reports in circulation that there are millions in the Hills, and that a half has not been told to make the most incredulous mortal breathing wild with gold fever in five minutes. The object of their trip is to impress upon the Northern Pacific folks the necessity for opening their road at once to Bismarck, to secure the trade and travel incident to the opening rush to the gold fields, this being by all odds the shortest and most direct, and hence the cheapest and easiest route for eastern parties, and to perfect arrangements with St. Paul merchants for supplies. They held a consultation last evening with Sup’t. Towne, and were by him authorized to telegraph “California Joe” and his party about to start from Bismarck for the Hills, that they could notify parties in the Hills that the road will be open for supplies, etc., to Bismarck, in ample time for them to get their outfits through from the latter place before the roads to the Hills break up in the spring. It is the practice, we believe, to have the road open by the first of March. They took the eastern train this morning for St. Paul to complete their business and afterward the party intend going to Chicago before their return. (Brainerd Tribune, 05 February 1876, p. 1, c. 7)

05 February
THE gratifying rumor is current that the new Northern Pacific directory, at a recent meeting in New York, resolved to assess a percentage on each bondholder to enable the company to build twenty-five miles of road west of Bismarck. This extension would take the road into the coal region and add largely to the business of the road. (Brainerd Tribune, 05 February 1876, p. 1, c. 4)

THE reading room in the Headquarters office building is nearly ready to be opened, and will be found a pleasant and profitable place to spend an evening—a thing very much needed in this city, and that cannot fail to be highly appreciated. Files of the leading eastern and St. Paul dailies will there be found, and many other prominent papers, the BRAINERD TRIBUNE of course included. Papers on the line of the N. P. and elsewhere are invited to place the “Brainerd Reading Room” on their “D. H.” list, and we assure them that in so doing their favors will be duly esteemed. (Brainerd Tribune, 05 February 1876, p. 1, c. 6)

11 February
We learn that Chas. Johns was quite severely injured last evening, while switching some cars in the yard here, though not as badly hurt as was at first supposed. (Brainerd Tribune, 12 February 1876, p. 1, c. 7)

12 February

THE NORTHERN PACIFIC R. R.
_____

$2,000,000.00
_____

Loaned by Montana to the Road.
_____

200 MILES TO BE BUILT FROM BISMARCK
INTO MONTANA IN TWO YEARS,
OPENING UP THE BLACK HILLS,
YELLOWSTONE VALLEY AND
MONTANA MINES.
_____

Construction to be Commenced in the
Spring.
_____

The Road has Shaken Off its In-
cumbrances and is Going
Ahead.
_____

Three Cheers for the Northern Pacific!
_____


WE give below, this week, the full text of the memorial to the Montana Legislature of Vice President Stark and Chief Engineer W. M. Roberts, of the Northern Pacific Railroad, who went last month to Montana for the purpose of securing a loan from that Territory for the extension of the road into their borders, as more fully set forth in the memorial.
The prospects of their success have been good from the very first, owing partly to the very feasible proposition of the company to the Territory, and partly to the strong desire of the people of the Territory for a railroad, and last evening the report reached here that Montana had accepted the proposition of the company in full. The report received is not official, but is yet quite authentic and at the hour of going to press is not successfully contradicted, and we feel justified in calling it reliable.
This is certainly good news to this section, not entirely undeserved by those who have stuck to the road through the dark years that have overshadowed it since the failure of J. Cooke & Co., maintaining faith in its future through all, though at times almost against hope. Hurrah for the Northern Pacific against the world, after all!

_____

A Memorial to the Council and
House of Representatives of the
Legislative Assembly of Mon-
tana:


George Stark, Vice President, Northern Pacific Railroad, ca. Unknown.
Source: Unknown
The undersigned respectfully represent that they are the agents of the Northern Pacific Railroad Company, duly accredited to appear before your Honorable Body in behalf of said railroad company, to confer with you upon measures needful for the extension of said railroad into your Territory, and to execute any such contract therefore as may be mutually agreed upon.
That the said Northern Pacific Railroad is now constructed from Duluth, on Lake Superior, to Bismarck, on the Upper Missouri, a distance of about 250 miles; and is also constructed from Tacoma, on Puget Sound to Kalama, on the Columbia River a distance of about 110 miles. That said Eastern and Western divisions, aggregating about 550 miles of railroad, are successfully operated, each of them paying considerably more than running expenses.
The said Northern Pacific Railroad Company has lately been reorganized by a foreclosure of its mortgage, and agreements of parties in interest, so that it stands to-day free from bonded debt, and with no liabilities except a small floating debt not exceeding half a million dollars, secured by collateral, and being rapidly extinguished. Its unencumbered property consists of 550 miles of first-class railroad, thoroughly equipped with about 50 locomotives and 1500 cars, that earned the past year more than one hundred thousand dollars over running expenses and a land grant now amounting to more than six million acres of land, earned and remaining unsold. The charter of the road also secures to it about 25,600 additional acres of land for every mile of road hereafter constructed. Probably there is not to-day another railroad of any magnitude in the country so free from debt, or where a tithe of so much property lies comparatively dormant, through lack of more complete development.
Your memorialists further respectfully represent that the interests of your great Territory are identical with ours, and that the extension of the Northern Pacific Railroad into your interior mining districts is the one thing absolutely essential for your future development. We state our case thus strongly because ours is the only direct route between the East and the West; the only transcontinental line to pass within your borders, and the only first-class route in contemplation. Any and all others can be but branched to the line nearly five hundred miles due south from you, to reach which, you must travel nearly five hundred miles out of your way, and then be subject to a monopoly of rates, that has been, and continues to be, complained of as exorbitant.
We are credibly informed and have statistics prepared by your own citizens, showing, that you are expending a million of dollars per annum for teaming your freight to and from the Union Pacific Railroad. That your goods are freighted to you at an average cost of one hundred and twenty dollars per ton by rail and team, and twenty cents per pound by express. That your stage line averages sixty dollars per passenger, each way. That your transportation facilities, even at these enormous rates, are so inadequate to your wants, that you have to-day more rich ores out of the mines and lying in cache or storage (much of it held for deliverance at from 1 1/2 to 2 1/2 per cent per month) than can be hauled away during the coming season. While these disabilities embarrass the working of your richest ores, they completely embargo the mining of such of your second class ores as, in more accessible parts of the country, would be considered of incalculable value. In consequence, out of many thousand gold and sliver veins recorded in your various counties, comparatively few are now worked at all.
Our railroad, extended into the heart of this rich mineral region, or to within an easy distance, would develop and bring out your dormant wealth, to an incalcuable extent. Your development and growth would be more rapid and startling that has been known in the history of this or any other country.
On the other hand, such a connection with you, and the consequent development of business, would place one thousand miles of our road between this point and the great interior lakes, in immediate paying condition, and secure an early connection with the Pacific coast.
With interests thus identical, and equally vast, we desire your earnest co-operation in the effort for an immediate advance. Our road is now within one hundred and sixty miles of your eastern border. The line of construction to that point and thence up the Yellowstone river is extremely feasible. The low price of labor and material makes the present time a favorable one for commencing construction. But in order to overcome the existing timidity of capital, to make it certain that the money invested is to be protected by the business of the Territory, we feel it will be necessary that the road should be extended at least two hundred miles within your borders, and that your interests in it should be such as to make it your line of travel and transportation. An extension of the road not less than three hundred and sixty miles west from Bismarck would make it easily accessible to you. An investment of your credit in the construction, secured by the proceeds of your business, would make it sure that the business would come, and equally certain that it would immediately increase to such an extent as to stimulate a steady and rapid extension of the railroad throughout the entire length of the Territory.
We beg leave to suggest for your consideration, a plan under which you can extend the helping hand to this great enterprise and put its wheels in motion, with giving a subsidy, and without taxation, either for interest or principal. And we now offer in behalf of our company, to construct our road from Bismarck to your eastern border, and to rail and operate so much road as you will furnish us bonds to grade and bridge and tie, not less than two hundred miles, in continuation of the same. The work to be commenced next spring and completed in two years.
We propose that you should issue for this purpose, two millions of Territorial bonds, bearing interest at the rate of eight per cent per annum, payable semi-annually, and maturing in twenty-five years. And that both interest and principal be secured by a lien upon the traffic of the road to and from Montana, the interest to be paid by the Railroad company out of such gross receipts, and such further sum to be paid out of said receipts semi-annually, and placed in trust, as will, with accruing interest, constitute a sinking fund sufficient to pay the bonds at maturity. One hundred and sixty thousand dollars per annum will create a sinking fund ample for the final redemption. Thus two hundred thousand dollars per annum, or about twenty per cent of your present freight bills, would be ample to secure you, on interest and principal, without any taxation whatever. The security is your own, and must be good as long as you do even the present limited business of the Territory; and by this simple loan of your credit, and assurance of your support, you open a channel of communication which is absolutely certain to increase your production, and your consequent security, a hundred fold.
Having thus briefly presented the ground work of our proposal, we hold ourselves in readiness to confer with you upon details, or to make full explanations, or to conclude contracts at your pleasure.
GEORGE STARK,
Vice President.
W. MILNER ROBERTS,
Chief Eng’r. N. P. R. R.
HELENA, January 17th, 1876.
(Brainerd Tribune, 12 February 1876, p. 1, c.’s 4 & 5)

DISSOLUTION OF CO-PARTNER-
SHIP.


The hotel business heretofore conducted under the firm name of E. W. WEED, at Brainerd, Minnesota, is this day dissolved by mutual consent.
E. W. Weed is hereby authorized to collect all monies due the firm, and binds himself to pay all outstanding liabilities.
Brainerd, Minnesota, February 11th, 1876.
E. W. WEED.
E. H. BLY.
(Brainerd Tribune, 12 February 1876, p. 4, c. 2)

19 February

“ROBERT,” ON THE NORTHERN PACIFIC
AND ITS MANAGEMENT.
_____


Editor Brainerd Tribune:

It has always been characteristic of your excellent local paper to improve every and all opportunities to uphold the Northern Pacific Railroad enterprise and say good words of encouragement when referring to any of the individuals in charge of its affairs—especially those of them who have been entrusted with its operating department and local management, they being more within the scope of your argus-eyed TRIBUNE, in their daily movements and conduct.
Among the piles of evidence in favor of the management of the Road in all its departments, and in praise of the country which it traverses, I am free to confess that, after over four years residence on the line, I cannot recall a single erroneous nor exaggerated statement your paper has ever contained in its uniformly kind reference; and, indeed, by reason of the consistent modesty you have necessarily had to observe, owing to your peculiar location on the line, the TRIBUNE, through its editorial columns has been constrained from even doing full justice to the efficient men in charge of its departments here, because you have feared, and very properly, that had you said more of them, the world outside might construe it, as poor mortals are too apt to construe kindly comments,—attribute them to selfish motives, and dub them “base flattery.”
Of the ultimate success and final grandeur of the Northern Pacific scheme, none have had the slightest doubt, who have lived on its line, and looked through the country it has, and is to open to the world. Nearly five hundred miles of road is now in successful operation, and it has, for three years past, united the deep blue waters of Lake Superior, by a continuous rail, with those of the Upper Missouri River; and now we are authoritatively informed that within a few weeks a commencement is to be made which will, within three years, lengthen the iron path away four or five hundred miles more toward that strangely fascinating country on the Yellowstone.
When I sometimes reflect on the wonderful things that have already happened during the present generation, and are continually transpiring in this great country, I am almost awe-stricken at the realization of them. Here, where but a few years ago a white man had scarce penetrated, and concerning which the wide world knew nothing, has for five hundred miles, opened like a bud ‘neath the rays of a morning sun. Now, all along the Northern Pacific are tasty, beautiful towns and villages, settled by Christian people, and amid the white cozy homes the glittering spires of churches and school houses rise high above all, shedding a moral influence o’er the whole, and here as in eastern communities, may be seen, every Sabbath, a worshiping and church-going people wending their way in crowds to the altar, in response to the sweet chimes of sacred welcome from the bells of Heaven. Cultivated farms extend far and wide upon every hand, and the busy husbandman is earnestly engaged in his noble toils to develop the wealth of the rich soil, spread over the landscape a new beauty, and rear a home to shelter those he loves, and extend a Christian hospitality to the traveler who may come to his door.
Six years ago, throughout this vast extent of country—now blooming with the industries of civilized and Christianized occupation—no woodsman’s axe had yet been heard, no builder’s hammer gave an echoing sound, no hum of business had stirred the silence which reigned both deep and broad throughout this vast and scarcely explored region. Until within so short a period, the lakes and lakelets, scattered in such profusion over the land, laved their pebbly beach and mirrored back the heavens in their panoramic grandeur, all unobserved and unadmired; no human sound, save the lullaby of the Indian mother or the whoop of the savage warrior e’er broke upon the silence of the plains or reverberated from hill to forest; the crystal brooks leaped and laughed in solitude, and the flowers, of a thousand hues, bloomed and studded the green earth like rich diamonds, and drooped with age only to return again with renewed beauty during countless years, with none to group them into bouquets of beauty, or rejoice over their coming and lament their annual passing away. The winds swept the grassy plains into waving majesty, brushed the crystal bosom of the lakes into sparkling riplets, and moaned among the boughs of the woodland with solemn and measured cadence, as if marking the elapse of time until the tread of man was heard to approach. But now, how changed!
Soon, man in all the power and majesty given him by civilization, will stride across and beyond the turbid waters of the Missouri, and conquer the plains toward the setting sun; the valleys will resound with the works of art, the streams will be guided into the mill wheels, and the mountain sides will give up their wealth of metals. The iron horse with trembling tread will fly across the prairies, plunge through forest, speed down the valleys and girdle the hills, while the buffalo will fly in frightened chase from the approach of the iron monster, and the red man’s trail will be lost among the highways of civilized man.
The Northern route to the Pacific, as is readily admitted by all who are informed, possess five times the amount of habitable domain as does the Central route, and almost as much as the country spanned by the proposed Southern route. As a grain growing country it eclipses both the other routes combined, and embraces within its own land grant by far the most gigantic, important and productive wheat field of the world—notably the Red River Valley. In a mineral aspect, its line passes through, and contiguous to most of the great gold and silver ranges on the continent, and will be the outlet for two-thirds the mineral products of the country, reaching sums of untold millions in value. Compared with the Central route, and as has by this time been proven to the most skeptical minds, the Northern Pacific route is emphatically free from all obstructions by snow blockades, and trains will be enabled to traverse the continent by this route during the winter months with no delay from snow worthy of a passing mention. This, we repeat, has been now proven beyond a question, by the experience of at least three of the hardest winters on record; and while the trains on the Northern Pacific ran daily during every one of these winters, with an average of less than sixty hours delay from snow (and the other two winters, including this one, with no detention whatever) all the roads south of it were blockaded for days at a time—some for weeks—and the Central Pacific terribly swamped several times every winter. And, the further extension of the Northern Pacific westward will, every mile, take it into ranges of country far less subject to snow than even the country though which it now runs.
No country on the globe surpasses the Northern Pacific region for health, richness of soil, varied resources, and, in the abundance and purity of the water.
As a region for the sportsman, the invalid, the lover of natural beauty, tourist, artist, or man of leisure, it offers a field equal to any we have ever visited or read about; and as soon as the road is extended to the Yellowstone country, the greatest of the world’s travelers—after having visited all the great wonders of the world elsewhere—can go and spend months in the Yellowstone region, when he must and will freely acknowledge that the greatest and most profound wonders of creation were left to be seen last.
The Road, now open from St. Paul to Bismarck, will be the highway for travel to the Black Hills, as it is a shorter route, more comfortable and safer, than any other. We expect during the next month or two to see hundreds flying westward by our quick trains toward the gold fields.
Although this great railroad, like every other uncompleted enterprise, and in fact the whole country, has for the past two years been under a cloud of embarrassment—so far as the progress of construction is concerned—now that it has been placed in shape, and obtained aid sufficient, coupled with its own abilities, it is now to move on to the west; and in another year or two at most, it is to be presumed, will run trains from Duluth and St. Paul into Helena, Montana; when, tapping an immense additional trade and business it will at once assume its natural place, as one of the greatest, most important and best paying railways in the world.
I spoke in the outset something concerning the officers of the Road here. What may be said of one of them may be truthfully said of all, and the whole may be briefly stated: They are men of eminence in their respective roles, and in every department the most perfect harmony, and business exactness prevails. They are, without exception, the nearest to natural born gentlemen of any set of officials in similar position that I have ever met. The humblest citizens may gain an audience with the highest of them at any time, and have the satisfaction of a respectful, and even kind hearing of their matters. They are as courteous and obliging as they are accomplished and gentlemanly, and I have often heard strangers traveling over the Road remark that they never, in all their travels, met so obliging and gentlemanly a set of men as were in charge of the Northern Pacific; and never saw matters progress so smoothly nor a road conducted with so few delays or accidents.
The Company has indeed been fortunate in being able to group together a corps of such gentlemen to operate the Road and conduct its business, and with whom the business men of the country, and the humble settlers along the line can take such perfect satisfaction in doing business.
I give below a list of the home officers at the General Headquarters at Brainerd:
Superintendent’s Office.—H. A. TOWNE, General Superintendent. Clerk—T. J. DeLamere.
Audit and Disbursing Department.R. M. NEWPORT, Auditor and Disbursing Agent. Assistants—J. W. Edgerton, M. P. Martin, C. Bloom, C. D. Child and Wm. Selby.
Land Department.J. B. POWER, General Agent. AssistantsC. F. Kindred, Edward Kopper, F. B. Thompson, John Holmes, and M. H. Davis.
Machinery Department.—W. H. LEWIS, Master Machinist. Clerk—Chas. Williams.
Engineering Department—M. C. Kimberley, Resident Engineer. Assistant—Ben. Franklin.
Master of Bridges.—S. J. WALLACE.
Train Dispatcher.—J. G. PINKERTON.
W. S. Alexander, the General Freight and Business Agent, (with J. W. Hannaford, his accomplished Assistant) is located in St. Paul, and though I have never had the pleasure of meeting him, I hear him highly spoken of, and doubt not he is a chip off the same block I have been describing.
At any rate, to meet any of them is a pleasure—whether met in business or social circles—and their friendship an honor to anyone. I should like to speak of the machinists, conductors, engineers and other train men, had I room in this already too voluminous letter, but shall take occasion to do so at a future time.
ROBERT.
(Brainerd Tribune, Morris C. Russell, 19 February 1876, p. 1, c.’s 4 & 5)

POWER:
SEE: 05 October 1871
SEE: 01 April 1873
SEE: 03 May 1873
SEE: 01 December 1873
SEE: 27 December 1873
SEE: 10 January 1874
SEE: 06 June 1874
SEE: 12 September 1874
SEE: 28 November 1874
SEE: 06 February 1875
SEE: 20 March 1875
SEE: 12 April 1875
SEE: 07 August 1875
SEE: 09 October 1875
SEE: 22 July 1876
SEE: 07 October 1876
SEE: 25 April 1877
SEE: 14 June 1877
SEE: 04 August 1877
SEE: 06 October 1877
SEE: 23 October 1877
SEE: 02 November 1877
SEE: 18 June 1878
SEE: 20 July 1878
SEE: 06 August 1878
SEE: 21 September 1878
SEE: 28 September 1878
SEE: 10 May 1879
SEE: 05 July 1879
SEE: 30 July 1879
SEE: 27 September 1879
SEE: 18 February 1880
SEE: 21 February 1880
SEE: 28 August 1880
SEE: 31 August 1880
SEE: 04 September 1880
SEE: 16 September 1880
SEE: 09 October 1880
SEE: 09 December 1880
SEE: 25 December 1880
SEE: 17 February 1881
SEE: 21 February 1881
SEE: 26 February 1881
SEE: 09 April 1881
SEE: 13 April 1881
SEE: 23 April 1881
SEE: 19 May 1881
SEE: 11 June 1881
SEE: 23 July 1881
SEE: 01 September 1881
SEE: 03 October 1881
SEE: 06 December 1881
SEE: 30 July 1882
SEE: 02 August 1882
SEE: 05 February 1917

NEWPORT:
SEE: 17 August 1872
SEE: 26 April 1873
SEE: 12 December 1874
SEE: 19 December 1874
SEE: 09 October 1875
SEE: 29 January 1876
SEE: 03 June 1876
SEE: 25 April 1877
SEE: 06 June 1877
SEE: 09 June 1877
SEE: 14 June 1877
SEE: 06 October 1877
SEE: 07 February 1880
SEE: 17 February 1881
SEE: 26 February 1881
SEE: 17 March 1881
SEE: 09 April 1881
SEE: 13 April 1881
SEE: 30 April 1881
SEE: 19 May 1881
SEE: 23 July 1881
SEE: 11 February 1882
SEE: 18 February 1882
SEE: 30 July 1882
SEE: 05 February 1917

KINDRED:
SEE: 07 November 1874
SEE: 14 November 1874
SEE: 28 November 1874
SEE: 07 June 1876
SEE: 23 March 1878
SEE: 28 September 1878
SEE: 18 January 1879
SEE: 31 May 1879
SEE: 27 September 1879
SEE: 26 June 1880
SEE: 31 August 1880
SEE: 09 December 1880
SEE: 25 December 1880
SEE: 17 February 1881
SEE: 21 February 1881
SEE: 09 April 1881
SEE: 13 April 1881
SEE: 23 April 1881
SEE: 19 May 1881
SEE: 11 June 1881
SEE: 23 July 1881
SEE: 03 October 1881
SEE: 06 December 1881
SEE: 30 July 1882
SEE: 02 August 1882
SEE: 20 September 1883
SEE: 23 September 1883
SEE: 26 August 1885
SEE: 13 December 1887
SEE: 31 May 1889
SEE: 25 March 1898
SEE: 05 February 1917

NORTHERN PACIFIC RAILROAD.
_____

What Vice President Stark Says
of the Proposed Montana Subsi-
dy, Etc.


Vice President Stark, of the Northern Pacific, arrived in Chicago Saturday, from Helena, Montana, and in an interview with a Chicago Tribune reporter gave the following information:
In response to the reporter’s queries, Gen. Stark stated that the Montana subsidy bill had passed the council by a vote of 11 to 1, and the house by a vote of 23 to 3.
“What is the amount of the subsidy?” queried the reporter.
“Three and a half millions, the amount being raised by territorial bonds running twenty-five years.”
“It is understood here that the grant is conditional.”
“So it is. The bill granting the subsidy provides that the railroad company shall raise enough money outside to complete the road to Bozeman. What we originally asked was that the territory give us outright $2,000,000 with no conditions; but perhaps this is just as well.”
“You spoke of Bozeman as the proposed terminus of the line. Many people in this part of the country are doubtless ignorant of its exact location.”
“Bozeman is situated 500 miles west of Bismarck, and 120 miles distant from Helena.”
“Will the road be pushed through to Helena?”
“That is impossible to tell. It is still an open question with us whether to run the road through to Helena or Deer Lodge. If we go through Helena, the route beyond that will be difficult to complete, as, on account of the nature of the country, there must be a great deal of tunneling and grading, or else a long detour must be made.”
“How many miles of track are now completed on the entire route?”
“There are two sections now in operation. One of these begins at Duluth and runs to Bismarck, a distance of 450 miles. Then, on the Pacific division, the road is finished from Puget Sound to the Columbia river, a distance of 105 miles.”
“How many miles are yet to be completed?”
“The gap between the two termini is about 800 miles in width.”
“Is there any immediate prospect of extending the Pacific division?”
“There is a very good prospect. In fact, negotiations are now pending for a continuation of the work on that portion of the road.”
“Concerning the work between Bismarck and Bozeman, how long will it take to put this part of the line ready for operation?”
“As near as I can judge from present appearances, it will take about three years.”
“Is the country so hilly as to hinder seriously the progress of the work?”
“No; there is nothing but a level plain between the two points, or at least until we strike the valley of the Yellowstone, and that is as easy for track laying as the generality of river bottoms. The chief obstruction to the work comes from the Indians.”
“You spoke about a condition attached to the subsidy grant, that the company is to raise enough money to complete the proposed extension. What do you estimate will be the amount required to be raised?”
“I figure it at about $6,000,000, and I am now on my way to New York to see about negotiating for loans to that amount.” (Brainerd Tribune, 19 February 1876, p. 1, c. 6)

A TRAIN will leave here to-morrow morning at 7 o’clock, direct for Bismarck—as direct as possible. But little difficulty will probably be experienced, though the stations will have to be supplied, and general arrangements made for a continuous business over the Dakota Division, all of which will take some time. We imagine the opening train will return the last of the coming week, with all its labors well done. General Superintendent Towne will go in charge of the work, which will guarantee “business.” (Brainerd Tribune, 19 February 1876, p. 1, c. 7)

THE NEW Reading Room at the General Railroad Office building, is now in full blast, and is a most creditable affair. The floor is newly matted, and the room most tastily and conveniently furnished with file desk, writing desk, tables, chairs, etc., and the sign, “Free Reading Room,” artistically painted on the front window. Our young men, and old men, too, can now spend their evenings most pleasantly and profitably.
The following papers are, or soon will be, on file in the Reading Room: Harper’s Monthly, Harper’s Weekly, Frank Leslie’s Illustrated Paper, Scribner’s Monthly, The Aldine, the most elegantly illustrated paper in the country, The Daily Graphic, Daily Pioneer, Daily Chicago Tribune, and Times, Daily Philadelphia Press, Semi-Weekly N. Y. Tribune, Weekly Springfield Republican, Weekly Detroit Free Press, New York Ledger, Scientific American, Western Manufacturer, Railroad Gazette, Brainerd Tribune, Detroit Record, and Fargo Times. This is an interesting list. It is hoped that all the other local papers on the line of the N. P. will soon be added. The Directors of the Room are H. A. Towne, R. M. Newport and M. C. Russell. They have imposed next to no restrictions, the only rules being, no smoking, no talking (for it is designed for a reading room, and people can’t read in a debating club) no defacing papers, or removing them from the room; the light to be put out at 10 1-2 p. m. Many thanks are due to the railroad officials here for their painstaking liberality in thus affording so a grand a Reading Room, free to all our people, and all are earnestly invited to make it their headquarters during their leisure hours. (Brainerd Tribune, 19 February 1876, p. 1, c. 7)

THE bill for extending the time for the completion of the Northern Pacific railroad passed the Senate by a large majority. When Holman and the other champions of the “no subsidy” policy in the House, get a crack at it, it may not be so successful. (Brainerd Tribune, 19 February 1876, p. 2, c. 1)

WE desire to wager another hat on the building of the Brainerd Branch this season, in hopes to retrieve the one we lost on the same proposition last year—or would have lost, had we paid the hat. (Brainerd Tribune, 19 February 1876, p. 1, c. 7)

22 February

THE NORTHERN PACIFIC BELT.
_____

What an Experienced Observer Says About the Splendid Country
Which Lies Between Minnesota
and the Black Hills.
_____


Pioneer Press Feb 22nd.

Knowing that any information in reference to the country along the line of the Northern Pacific railroad (especially that portion of it lying west of the Red River of the North) is now eagerly sought after and thankfully received by many persons, both in our midst and in other states, who are contemplating a trip to the Black Hills, the reporter took occasion yesterday to interview Mr. J. J. Brooks, of this city, who has just returned from a business trip to Fargo, and the Northern Pacific railroad west of that place. At the time Mr. Brooks left Fargo the road had not yet been opened, but a large corps of workmen were busily engaged along the line and repairs on the bridge about eight miles west of Fargo, which had been burnt by prairie fires, were being rapidly pushed to completion. This latter was the only impediment to running through trains to Bismarck.
Mr. Brooks reports Fargo as a thriving and promising young town, with all the necessaries and some of the luxuries of older and larger cities, including an opera house; and judging from a programme of the performances at this far western temple of Thespis, the inhabitants are fortunate in the possession of so strong a stock company. There is of course considerable excitement both at Moorhead and Fargo on the all engrossing topic of the Black Hills, and there are almost daily departures from the latter place for the new El Dorado of the northwest. Mr. Brooks did not himself go in search of big bonanzas or Comstock lodes, his business being the less exciting but more profitable one, of investigating the quality and fertility of the soil, and the general condition and prospects of that section of country for agricultural purposes. From him we learn that the land along the line of railroad west of Fargo is being rapidly taken up by actual settlers, who express themselves well satisfied with their new homes. There are already thousands of acres broken and ready for seeding the coming spring. The soil is a black loam from two to three feet in depth. Beneath this is a cream colored clay subsoil, from which the finest building bricks are being made. Mr. Brooks who is himself a practical farmer, unequivocally says that for richness and fertility he considers this soil unsurpassed and both soil and climate particularly adapted to the raising of our chief product, wheat. The yield from last year’s crop ran from 25 to 40 bushels per acre, the wheat being the best article of No. 1 and weighed from 60 to 65 pounds to the measured bushel. Vegetables of all kinds grow in profusion. Mr. Brooks brought down with him from the Northern Pacific nursery located 18 miles west of Fargo, specimens of both cottonwood and willow trees of one season’s growth, from cuttings, measuring eight feet in length, which are self-evident proofs of the practicability of timber culture in that part of the northwest. The question of fuel, however, is one of but secondary importance, as compared with other prairie counties, for the railroad company deliver wood along the line of the road, from the inexhaustible forests of northern Minnesota, at the reasonable rate of three dollars and a half per cord. The more enthusiastic residents are looking for the good time coming when the road will be completed west of Bismarck, and they can draw their supply of coal from the as yet undeveloped coal mines of Montana and Western Dakota. Mr. Brooks corrects the erroneous idea that the soil of Northern Dakota is impregnated with alkali. On the contrary, the whole country is well watered by innumerable pure and clear streams, and wells dug to the depth of 50 to 100 feet furnished an equally pure article of water which very frequently rises to the top of the well, seeking of course its own level.
Mr. Brooks thinks it a fixed fact, that the Red River valley is soon to be the great wheat belt of the northwest, with the unexcelled facilities for the transportation of its products by rail and the great lakes to the markets of the world. Mr. Brooks tells us that active preparations are now going on in anticipation of an active business season as soon as navigation opens on the Red River. A new steamboat is in progress of construction and is now nearly finished, for the Kittson line of steamers, and the Red River trade, already a large one, promises to become enormous this year. Very lively times are expected by the steamboatmen from Fargo to Fort Garry.
As an evidence our informant is no theorist, Mr. Brooks will himself return in the early spring to the vicinity of Maple river, a beautiful stream 12 miles west of Fargo, where he proposes at once opening up a large farm on part of his recently purchased lands. (Brainerd Tribune, 26 February 1876, p. 1, c. 5)

25 February

N. P. R. R.
_____

OPENING THE DAKOTA.
_____

Three Days to Jamestown.
_____

Cuts Full West. The Only Accident a
Broken Rail Wrecks the Plow and
Damages the Engine
Slightly.
_____

PROSPECTS OF REACHING BISMARCK
SUNDAY.
_____

Ticketed for Hades.
_____

A PARTY FOR BLACK HILLS.
_____


Special to the Tribune.
JAMESTOWN, D. T., Feb. 25.—Left Fargo Monday morning about 9 a. m., got through to Jamestown Wednesday night in good shape and everything in good condition. Left Jamestown 7 a. m., Thursday, and in opening a cut about one o’clock p. m. yesterday the plow struck a broken rail, wrecking the plow and damaging engine No. 10, but not badly.
We are back here with damaged engine and plow—but little damaged by the accident. In the morning I will start again early for the front. Very little snow on the plains, but the cuts are full. Everybody well; no serious accidents. Fair prospect of reaching Bismarck Sunday night. I had my run on the plow at the drift just before the plow broke when going into the drift at a speed of 25 miles per hour. I thought I was ticketed for Hades, and preferred to be excused from any more. Towne, Lewis, Fitzpatrick—in fact all the boys work like heroes, and the tremendous obstacles to free transportation over Dakota Division sink into insignificance before their gigantic efforts. With fair luck will be back in Brainerd inside of a week, and the road open to the Missouri. Yesterday was warm, balmy and thawing, and the voice of the badger was heard in our land. To-day the wind blows severe and no immediate prospect of storm. This a. m. a train composed of a dozen sleds, drawn by ponies, passed us near 10th Siding. There were about 15 men fully armed and equipped, and they appeared to be ready for business. More from Bismarck.
ROBERT, JR.
(Brainerd Tribune, Chauncey B. Sleeper, 26 February 1876, p. 1, c. 3)

26 February

Dakota Fencing.


Actions speak louder than words. As an inkling of what the Northern Pacific Company propose to do in the future, we would state that Eber H. Bly has obtained the contract to get out cedar posts enough to completely snow-fence the Dakota Division this season, and he now has men engaged in the work. This is conclusive evidence that the Company intend to operate the whole road hereafter winter and summer, and also indicates an early movement in the construction of the Road west of the Missouri river. (Brainerd Tribune, 26 February 1876, p. 1, c. 5)

TO FARGO AND BACK.


We were permitted to ride out as far as Fargo the other day, on the “Opening Train,” and see the snow outfit leave Fargo for Bismarck, to open the Dakota Division. The outfit, under the immediate management of General Superintendent H. A. Towne, assisted by W. H. Lewis and J. B. Davidson left Fargo about eight o'clock Monday morning, and made an imposing display—next to a brigade about to storm the enemy’s works. A monster plow led the van, with three engines to force it through; then there was the workmen’s train with some seventy-five professional shovelelists, and all armed to the teeth with all the articles incident to that kind of warfare; following the “work train” which also embraced several car loads of coal and wood—was the boarding and supply train, and then the Superintendent’s train. The whole organization and the “start” was formed, and made on that frosty morning with the utmost precision and quiet order, and when ready, moved westward watched by a multitude of well wishers until the last had faded from sight across the beautiful Maple River. We could not think but that the “opening” of the Division must prove a comparatively easy task, with the thorough arrangements, efficient corps, and perfect order, that must have been apparent to the most casual observer. Certainly, anything but the “toughest of nuts” must crack easily, when attacked by such a force, which consisted in detail of two plows, four engines, ten cars of coal, six cars of wood, three sleeping cars, three dining cars, three commissary cars, two kitchen cars, one tool car, two cabooses and the superintendent’s car, and manned by over one hundred men—including the train men.
Capt. Sleeper accompanied the outfit and will keep the Tribune readers posted on progress.
We had a pleasant trip, and a comfortable entertainment at the Headquarters Hotel—with its fine rooms, soft beds, and left-handed dining room—for Carson, the clerk, and Hubbard & Tyler, the proprietors, do know how to engineer a hotel and make guests feel good at every turn. The Fargoites are all happy and prosperous, and “swear by their town;” they claim that in ten years Fargo will contain ten thousand population, and be surrounded by the best agricultural country that lays out of doors in any country; and although we were hunting around for bets on almost any proposition that day, we didn’t bet against this assertion—because, bets where we were dead sure to lose, wasn’t the sort of wagers we were hunting for. Fargo is a good town, with a grand prospect before it.
P. S.—So is Moorhead. (Brainerd Tribune, 26 February 1876, p. 1, c. 6)

IT is stated by judges that the railroad ties being gotten out along the Northern Pacific this winter are uniformly of a very superior quality—the best ties ever delivered on this or any other western line. Mr. Williams, the Purchasing Agent, has been very particular as to specifications, and in return, when receiving day comes, he will have the gratification of receiving a lot of ties the poorest of which will average with the best ties put into many of the western roads. You see the Northern Pacific tie men know how to make a railroad cross ties, and are making ties fit to send to the Centennial, even at the very moderate price allowed. (Brainerd Tribune, 26 February 1876, p. 1, c. 6)

THE Northwestern Bridge Company’s crew arrived in the city Thursday night from Chicago, taking quarters at the Leland House, and commenced work on the superstructure of the railroad bridge here in good earnest yesterday morning. Their time is short for completing the job before the ice goes out, a fact they appear fully to appreciate. (Brainerd Tribune, 26 February 1876, p. 1, c. 7)

28 February

OPENING THE DAKOTA.
_____

The Opening Outfit En Route—
The Boys Jolly, Working Hard,
With Good Luck and Fair Pros-
pects.
_____


ELEVENTH SIDING, DAKOTA DIVISION, N. P. R. R., Feb. 28th, 1876.
Bro. Hartley: We “came, saw, and conquered,” the heaviest snow drifts on the line. Bucking snow is lively—Moses! how it flies! How tremendously the wind howls. Time moves slowly, but all things considered the expedition has progressed rapidly to this point. Cuts are full—hard as ice—and much of it ice two feet thick, pressed down by ten to fifteen feet of snow.
This is a country of great awe—expansive. Man expands into a—pygmy, a poor weak vessel. But we have lots of “push” with us and lots ahead of us. Are we equal to the emergency? Yes. What lies beyond? “No one has passed the charmed boundary and come back to tell” the truth about it. The future “casts its shadows before.” We don’t like the shadow. The same shadow obscured No. 10, and she is soliloquizing under the walls of Fort Seward. The valley of the James opens up her many beauties to the passing traveler, but No. 10 stands mute and passive on the side track a monument to that uncertainty that surrounds snow bucking enterprises. All glory, and honor, and majesty to No. 10.

NP snowplow clearing the track between Fargo and Bismarck, ca. 1877.
Source: Frank Jay Haynes
Towne says, “Push boys, push—push with care. Push in the presence of the passenger” (which means me) Lewis says, “Amen,” and Fitzpatrick seconds the motion, and we move. Jabez weighs a ton. Sweetman says “All right, boys.” Mel. Richards smokes and makes a clean run towards the Black Hills, but stops into the next cut, buried under the snow and ice. Colter looks composedly on and waits for the signal to advance and help the plow out. Brady holds his lever with a firm grip and abides his time. Rand draws Sweetman’s train. Here they are, Richards and Colter, backing down half a mile for a run at the snow drift. There they go! like a thing of life, the two-celled screaming, screeching catapult, projected with mighty power, and, with a momentum of 50 miles per hour, strikes the solid snow. How she flies! and how these ponderous monsters thrown “wide open” puff, and blow, and smoke, and make the earth tremble with their mighty laborings! Great rakes of ice and snow roll up the faces of the plow and fly out sixty feet from the track. The quick, lightning stroke of the piston, the escape of exhausted steam, and the rapid whirl and buzz of the ponderous drivers tell their story, to-wit: That seventy tons of solid iron, cast, wrought, bays, bolts screws, valves, frames, cocks, wheels, trucks, discs, brakes—with steam, fire, coal, water wood, and men acting in concert and to one accomplishment—a creation that Jove would have delighted in—cannot go through these cuts filled with 15 feet of snow and ice, pounded down into a compact and solid mass by these Dakotian winds, unless used on the principle of a battering ram, and then they will present lots of cheek and stand any amount of batter. The engines rest from their labors for a time. Tom, Jim, Fitz., and Con. Short bring up the “shovel brigade” in fine style. They are just up from Bro. Swain’s commissary quarters, and have got that full head of steam on which his carbonaceous and muscle blowing provision never fails to generate; and they are told that the Black Hills are just over the summit and the Sioux Indians just in the rear; they don’t make the snow fly much! Who says that? The engine is dug out in just four minutes, ready for another batter; and this goes on from cut to cut, across this wilderness of wildness and desolation, from hour to hour and day by day—I won’t say week to week, I can’t comfortably—so I’ll skip that part of it to-day. Can I next week? “Aye, there’s the rub.” (This little bit of Shakespeare carries me back to “home, love and kindred,” like, but I won’t try; I don’t wish I was back; in fact, I wouldn’t go back on this snow—not much! I want to stay with it perhaps all the summer. How cold it would be and refreshing then! and how you good people of Brainerd would envy such deliciousness. But I am anticipating. I would rather not, but it is so easy to anticipate with a thousand cuts ahead, each one pregnant with its anti-combustive impregnation). Sixty miles per hour! No! Yes, sir; sixty miles per hour and not much of a day for wind either. Oh, I thought you meant the train. Well, well; if there is any train in this community that can drift along one-fifth as fast as that, I should like to see it. See it? Look ahead then; see! No. 31. Yes. She moves over one quarter of a mile at that rate, but she gets out of breath too quick. She likes to rest and cool her panting sides in the appalling drifts, and she is getting so used to it she sometimes won’t go a mile in sixty hours! Predicating a calculation upon the above, how long will it be before we reach Bismarck? If any Tribune readers solve this problem before we do, let us know. We are getting anxious for a solution. But we are dreaming. We “must to business.” We are all here, and all of each of us, and all the material of the outfit in fine condition.
Mind analyzes matter; obstacles yield to its combinations, and the Dakota Division bares its bosom to the world’s traffic, accepting the mastery of skilled intellect. That is what it means, and why this outfit is here.
Sup’t. Towne, W. H. Lewis, Fitzpatrick, Tom, Jim, and Short work like heroes. They know how to do this thing, and they are doing it with a will. Bro. Davidson says it is time to quit. I yield to his suggestion. I am, where? (who answers, where)? Regards as Robert; why don’t the old man write us a line?
Yours truly,
ROBERT, JR.
P. S.—Charley McKneven, our boss cook, commissary and steward, and prince of good boys, says supper is ready and Robert, Jr., deserves a a rest at the right of the head. We like it and shut down on our warm steak with great unction and thankfulness to Charley. “May he never live to starve.” (Brainerd Tribune, Chauncey B. Sleeper, 04 March 1876, p. 1, c.’s 4 & 5)

07 March

OPENING THE DAKOTA.
_____


FARGO, D. T., March 7, 1876.


Editor Tribune:—Since my last we have made haste slowly. Each day has been simply a repetition of the first—out of one cut into another. All of them full. The boys have all done their duty. Sup’t. Towne and Lewis personally inspected the cuts, and persevered through prodigious difficulties. The 29th of February we made about twenty miles, March 1st about six miles, and the 2nd inst. about 10 miles. Friday a big day’s work was accomplished, making about six miles and stopping over night just west of 16th Siding. We had been told that there was no snow in this part of Dakota, but here we found the most of it. The fact is, that along the whole line of the road there is a large amount of snow in the valleys, and wherever it is protected from the wind; and we found that its quantity did not diminish until across the “Big Slough,” near 17th Siding, and 29 miles east of Bismarck.
Saturday was another day of hard work, but by superhuman exertion we reached 17th Siding at 5 o'clock p. m. and Bismarck 20 minutes to 8, every man sound in wind and limb, and the material of the expedition in good condition, excepting engine No. 10 slightly disabled, as stated in former communication. All of Bismarck turned out and greeted us with cheers, and seemed highly pleased that the sunlight of civilization had again penetrated their far off hamlet. Their night of desolation and dreariness had ended after over three months duration. The Black Hills looked to them less dim in the distance, and its particles of gold took on a brighter luster. Fort A. Lincoln, from its elevated plateau, smiled down upon us, and old “Muddy” hid its sedimental currents under its ice-bound covering that we might be properly received on such an occasion.
At half past 8 a. m., Sunday, we took our leave of Bro. Davidson and Bismarckers generally, and with fair prospects started for Fargo and home. As we reached the elevated grounds at 17th Siding the blizzards were having a jubilee. Still we moved on, but before reaching 13th Siding were shut in. The winds flew terrific, and the snow falling rapidly soon hedged us in. Here we laid up for the night. Next morning the winds had subsided, and we telegraphed for Sweetman to come on with fuel and the reserved plow and pusher to meet us, which he did at about 4 o’clock p. m. We found lots of snow, but it was not hard and could be thrown out easily by the plow. Monday night we laid up at Jamestown; Tuesday moved forward, finding cuts nearly all full, and after a hard day’s work made Fargo at 9 o'clock p. m. after an absence of 16 days. In that time—throwing out mountains of snow, traversing 392 miles of road that had been surrendered to the elements over three months of winter, without injury to any of the men, and a slight injury to one engine of the six that had been engaged in the enterprise. We think this speaks well for the intelligence, prudence and good judgment of those in charge of the expedition, and tells its own story much better than we can.
We wish in conclusion to express our substantial gratitude to Sup’t. Towne, Master Mechanic Lewis and others for the many evidences of their gentlemanly attentions during our sojourn with them, and assure them the time passed on the Dakota plains, under their pilotage, will be kindly remembered. The N. P. R. R. Co. should feel proud of such men, even as they are proud of it.
ROBERT, JR.
(Brainerd Tribune, Chauncey B. Sleeper, 11 March 1876, p. 1, c. 5)

09 March
Sup’t. H. A. Towne arrived in the city Thursday evening from the Dakota Division of the N. P. R. R., which he has opened to Bismarck, and trains are now running regularly from St. Paul to Bismarck, carrying the crowds of Black Hillsters to within 195 miles of the region of gold. The fare from Chicago to Bismarck is fixed at $31 for first class and $25 for second class passage, and very many are taking advantage of the extremely low rates by this route. (Brainerd Dispatch, 11 March 1876, p. 1, c. 7)

18 March

A Sketch of the Life of M. C.
Russell, Founder of the Brainerd Tribune.


Morris Craw Russell, founder, editor and publisher of the Brainerd Tribune, the first newspaper on the line of the Northern Pacific Railroad east of the Rocky Mountains, ca. 1904.
Source: Uncle Dudley's Odd Hours, The Home Printery, Lake City, Minnesota: 1904
By the departure of M. C. Russell, Esq., from among us for his new home at Lake City, Minn. we are reminded that one by one our early settlers drop out from the ranks of those who laid the foundation of our young “City of Pines,” while others step in to fill their places. As the waves rolling across the face of the great deep are followed closely by their successors, so we, as we enter upon, pass over and step off the stage of action in this world are only giving place to the pressing throng behind, and the “place that knows us to-day will soon know us no more forever.” Pleasing or otherwise these reveries are facts, as fixed as Gibraltar, and finding their evidences in every transaction in every day life.
If an apology for this lengthy personal was necessary, the particular prominence in which Bro. Russell has “figured” in this section would, in the absence of any other excuse, (though we think others will occur to the reader in the following) be sufficient reason for giving at this time this brief sketch of his past life as we have gathered it, partly from himself and partly from personal observation during our, we may say, very intimate acquaintance of the past four years. He has, from his early youth, led an active, not to say, adventurous life. In 1854 a lad of 14 he came to Minnesota, (then only the home of the savage, and a few traders and adventurers) to use his own language “afoot and alone.”
His first avocation in Minnesota—that of boatman on the Mississippi and Minnesota rivers—he abandoned in his nineteenth year, assuming the editorship of the Belle Plaine Enquirer. He subsequently conducted the Shakopee Argus, the Shakopee Spectator, and during its existence was the local editor of the Winona Daily Democrat. Thence he enlisted in the Second Minnesota Infantry, (having resigned a lieutenancy in a regiment that was to remain at home to enlist as a private in the Second going to the front) and served a year in the South, when he was discharged for physical disability, and returning home joined Gen. Sibley’s army in the Sioux massacre, assuming with the [sic] [three] others the most dangerous duty to be performed on that expedition—that of an advanced spy to “feel of the ground” on the west side of the Minnesota and report at Traverse des Sioux, while Gen. Sibley proceeded up the east side.
After this horrible massacre was over and the bloody war was ended, Mr. Russell, now a married man, removed with his family to Tennessee, and for some time was the local editor of the Nashville Daily Union and American. This he abandoned for a position of promise on the Russellville (Ky.) Herald, and with his family removed to Kentucky, where he was attacked by the chills and fever incident to those low lands, and after suffering very poor health for some time finally decided to return north, which he did, landing in Brainerd in November, 1871, his means nearly exhausted in battling disease. Here he struck the hotel biz in partnership with a brother he chanced to meet, and built what is now the No. 1, calling it the “American House;” but three months sufficed to convince him that he “couldn’t keep hotel,” and he turned over his interest to his brother, and with a five cent nickel in his pocket he conceived and immediately entered upon the greatest project of his life, to date—that of founding the BRAINERD TRIBUNE—the first newspaper on the line of the Northern Pacific railroad. To this project is Brainerd indebted to a great extent for her early notoriety and subsequent greatness, the Northern Pacific railroad would be less flourishing, its country more sparsely settled, and its extraordinary advantages and resources by far less known to the outside world had it not been for Bro. Russell’s project—the BRAINERD TRIBUNE. Go where you will, speak to whom you may of Brainerd and the Northern Pacific, and they know all about them, they “have read the BRAINERD TRIBUNE.” We have faith greater than a grain of mustard seed that in the near future, when the question of the grand success of the Northern Pacific scheme shall be a thing of the past; when its thousands of feeders in the shape of branch lines have reached into and opened up its myriads of tributary valleys yet uninhabited and “flowing with milk and honey;” its rich mining districts yet undeveloped and teeming with gold, silver, iron, coal—in fact nearly every mineral known; its yawning canyons in the Yellowstone valley, as yet but partially explored, abundant with mammoth caves, geysers, burning mountains and natural wonders and curiosities of every nature, eclipsing Iceland, casting Italy in the shade, and excelling in magnitude, grandeur and variety anything the known world produces, that skirt its line on either hand from Lake Superior to Puget Sound, holding out inducements to the farmer, stock raiser, fruit grower, gold prospector, coal miner, curiosity seeker, tourist—in fact the whole world, with something for all; when it has extended its connections into Russian America, thence flying the turbulent Behrings and passing through Siberia and Russia to St. Petersburg, Paris, London, Madrid, Rome and Constantinople, and through China touching at Pekin and Hong Kong to farther India, Hindustan, the Holy Land, Arabia, Egypt and the countries of Africa, running through trains and trade from all the principal points in the Old World by our very doors; when all these things shall have come to pass—even though Bro. Russell and ourself should be in tottering old age, or perchance “gathered unto our fathers,” having died in full faith in the final consummation of “all the prophecies in this book contained,” the BRAINERD TRIBUNE will stand in the glory of its might a living, thriving, shining, invincible, imperishable monument to the memory of its founder, M. C. Russell, and a result of the success of the object of its existence.
But to return to our “story.” At that day Brainerd was a “shanty” town, its streets full of logs and brush, with a surging mass of men from all parts of the country (composed of many of the worst, and some of the best, men in the world) as inhabitants, with dens of vice on every hand of every description, and the day as well as night made hideous by the brawls in the streets and infamous places of resort.
We remember well our first introduction to Bro. Russell; he came to our office to disclose to us his project—that of starting the Tribune and to solicit our subscription, saying that he was “a stranger in the place and scarcely knew one man from another, but as every one else seemed to be a stranger in the town, and all strangers together, he didn’t know as it made much difference where he commenced his canvass.” Incredulity ran high as to the prospects of the project in the crowd present, and knowing grins were exchanged freely at Bro. R.’s expense, but as times were flush all hands subscribed, being somewhat captivated by the earnest, sanguine and withal honest, candid appearance of the good looking stranger. The incident was soon forgotten amid the rush and excitement of the day, and was not again thought of until Sunday morning, February 6th, 1872, at the hour of the arrival of the mail when on a table in the post office Bro. Russell unrolled his first edition of the BRAINERD TRIBUNE—red-hot, newsy, full of life and a pretty sheet. The post office was crowded with men, and he sold six hundred copies at ten cents each as fast as he could fold them and rake in the dimes. The first six numbers were printed entirely at the St. Cloud Journal office, seventy miles distant, by stage; the “copy” being written up here and sent by mail, and the completed edition being returned by stage each Sunday morning.
At the end of this time he had saved enough to buy a small outfit of printing material, and thereafter he printed his paper at home, and by strict economy and hard work, as time rolled on, he added new material as he was able, until within a couple of years he had a fine newspaper and job printing office, costing nearly four thousand dollars. Finding his quarters—a board shanty—too small for his growing business he removed his office to the second story of a fine building on Front street, which on Dec. 18, 1874, was burned to the ground, and with it every dollar of his savings, leaving him where he started, excepting that he was minus the five cent nickel. This was a severe blow to Bro. Russell and his cherished project the BRAINERD TRIBUNE, and doubtless cooled his ardor to a great extent; yet, though not a little abashed by what with one possessing less fortitude and experience would have been signal defeat, he was not vanquished, but with an eye single to his one great aim he at once determined to raise the Tribune from its ashes, which he did with the aid of our citizens, purchasing a new office complete, largely on credit, and issuing the Phoenixized Tribune the next week on its regular publication day.
But the hard times grew harder, the heavy debt incurred in his purchase grew heavier from accrued interest, etc., and he found the load greater than he could carry, and in April last he decided to sell the TRIBUNE, the present proprietor becoming the purchaser. After disposing of the Tribune, Bro. Russell, with his job department, went to Duluth and purchased an interest in the Herald of that city, hoping to build himself up in business once more, but a lack of support drove him to abandon that scheme after three months trial and he returned to Brainerd with his job office to get his bearings once more and take a fresh start. What he conceived to be a good offer of partnership was made him by the Leader, of Lake City, Minn., shortly after his return, which he has finally accepted, and selling to us his job material, presses, etc., has removed with his family to that place where, after a life of labor and adventure experienced by few of his age, he “hopes to become permanently settled, engaging the balance of his life in his favorite calling—that of journalist, with the Lake City Leader as his journal.
Although Bro. Russell can beat the fellow who “started out in life without a cent, and after thirty years labor didn't have a darned cent yet,” still, owing to misfortunes and untoward circumstances generally, he leaves our “City of Pines” with but little of this world’s goods to show for the extraordinary labor he has performed and hardships he has undergone, and we sincerely hope that hereafter his labors may be attended with that success he deserves. (Brainerd Tribune, 18 March 1876, p. 1, c.’s 4 & 5)

NORTHERN PACIFIC EXTENSION BILL.
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A private letter to one of our citizens from a friend at the Capital, conveys the unwelcome intelligence that the probabilities are strong that the bill extending the time for the Northern Pacific company to complete their road will be defeated in the lower house of Congress. The writer gives as his reason for the prediction the fact that the Democrats in the Senate, when the bill was on its passage in that branch, voted solid against it, and that being true the presumption is strong and quite reasonable that the Democratic house will defeat it.
This would certainly be a very serious setback to the Northern Pacific and this section of country—in fact a territory equal to one-fourth of the Union looking to this road to open it to civilization would be very materially damaged by it, as it would check and probably stop entirely the tide of emigration thus fairly turned in this direction, which in any event could not be regained in two or three years.
The time under the present charter expires July 1, 1877, and the road must have an extension or forfeit its grant, the immediate result of which would be to defeat the present Montana project, leaving that Territory to accept its only alternative—the narrow gauge road offered by the Union Pacific—and to postpone indefinitely a resumption of construction, which would effectually place the hope of any aid from Montana forever beyond the reach of the Northern Pacific.
In fact, a breach occurring now at the very juncture of success would over throw all present laid schemes, necessitate an entire change of base, and be largely detrimental, financially, to the company.
We trust; however, that these fears are not well grounded, and that the required time (eight years) will yet be granted. (Brainerd Tribune, 18 March 1876, p. 1, c. 6)

THE NORTHERN PACIFIC.
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When Jay Cooke & Co. went down amid the ruins of their banking establishment seemingly carrying the country with them, the future was very dark, and the Northern Pacific enterprise quite hopeless. But we were among those who believed that the road would eventually be built, for everything tended to teach that it was a project of absolute necessity. The news that have come from Montana helps to confirm our faith. The Legislature in both branches has almost unanimously voted a subsidy of three and a half millions of dollars. This action must be ratified by the people, but there is no doubt about the matter. One condition has been attached to the subsidy grant and that is the company must raise about six millions outside to complete the extension of the road to Bozeman. Vice President Stark is now in New York city negotiating for loans to the amount. On the Pacific Division the road is completed from Puget Sound to the Columbia River, a distance of 105 miles. The section between Duluth and Bismarck, 450 miles in length, is in operation, so that the gap between the two termini is about 800 miles.
The Northern Pacific has one overwhelming advantage over the Union Pacific R. R., and that is, the question of distance—being 700 miles nearer the Asiatic ports than San Francisco.
Writing from Olympia, W. T., a correspondent of the Philadelphia Press says:
“Following along the 48th degree of latitude we find it is 28 miles across one degree of longitude. Take the latitude of San Francisco near the 37th parallel, the degrees of longitude are 49 miles in length, or a difference of 10 miles. This, in crossing the continent and the Atlantic to Liverpool, makes a difference of twelve hundred miles, as the entrance of Puget Sound and San Francisco is in longitude 122 degrees. Looking westward across the Pacific the difference is not so much in the length of the degrees of longitude, as the shipping from San Francisco run up to and even about the latitude of Puget Sound, and all the shipping across the Pacific Ocean, both from San Francisco and Puget Sound, take the same track in consequence of certain prevailing ocean currents. Hence San Francisco is further removed from Asiatic ports than Puget Sound by the difference of the distance between them, which is nearly seven hundred miles. These considerations will not be overlooked by the commercial world, and eventually will turn the tide of freight and travel over to the northern channel for transportation.
The eastern shore line of Puget Sound presents a series of locations, from the forty-ninth parallel of latitude down to the forty-seventh, that are favorably situated for shipping by the common outlet, the Fuca Strait, and we may yet see not one vast city like New York, overcrowded and overburdened, but a succession of cities upon the beautiful shores of the sound, giving room to all and great convenience to many.”
Steadily, though quietly, yet surely, a railroad is building from St. Petersburg to the mouth of the Amoor river, and already negotiations are pending for early establishing of a line of steamships and sail vessels to connect with the “shortest and speediest route to the interior Continent of America,” which we interpret here to point to Puget Sound as the great entrepot of this new trade, and her railroad connections east and south for the connecting links with the interior.
The completion of the Northern Pacific, we hope, will not be delayed many years. Think of the rapidly increasing and profitable trade of China, Japan, and Russia rolling past our doors!--We of the north-west of course look forward with great interest to the steady development of this trade. As the Central Pacific R. R. was the vignette of a new era and a higher civilization for the far west so the Northern Pacific will be. We regard it as the inauguration of a new era of prosperity in the great northwest, in fact throughout the whole country. We look to it, also, as the iconoclast of the fearful monopoly that has grown up and strengthened under the auspices of the only thorough continental line now in operation, the Central and Union Pacific.—[Stillwater Lumberman. (Brainerd Tribune, 18 March 1876, p. 4, c. 2)

23 March
Gen. Custer was in Brainerd Thursday night on his way to Washington in obedience to a subpoena from Congress to appear and testify before one of its committees. He took the eastern train yesterday. (Brainerd Tribune, 25 March 1876, p. 1, c. 7)

25 March
THE latest news regarding the St. Paul & Pacific railroad, is the following from the New York Railroad Gazette of last week: “Messrs. Geo. S. Coe, John S. Barnes, Edwin C. Litchfield, J. Carp and J. C. DeVries, trustees under the agreement of August, 1875, give notice that more than $9,000,000 out of the $11,500,000 of bonds embraced in that agreement have been deposited in accordance with its terms. All holders of any of the said bonds who desire to participate in the arrangement are required to deposit their bonds and past-due coupons with the Associatie Cassa in Amsterdam, Holland; the Union Bank of London, England, or the United States Trust Company, New York, within 20 days from March 9. The bonds to be surrendered are the Main Line $3,000,000 mortgage of 1864; the Main Line $6,000,000 mortgage of 1868; the $1,200,000 Branch Line mortgage of 1862; the outstanding $1,134,000 of the $2,800,000 Branch Line mortgage of 1865, and the outstanding $1,000,000 of the mortgage of 1870, together with all outstanding coupons.” (Brainerd Tribune, 25 March 1876, p. 1, c. 5)

THE snow blockade on the Dakota Division has been raised, and through trains run once more. (Brainerd Tribune, 25 March 1876, p. 1, c. 7)

THE Bridge Company expects to have the fifth and last span of the R. R. bridge swinging to-morrow, Sunday night. The other four are up and complete. (Brainerd Tribune, 25 March 1876, p. 1, c. 7)

31 March

The New Bridge.


New NP Bridge, north from below the bridge, 1877. A 1722x1818 version of this photo is also available for viewing on line.
Source: Frank Jay Haynes Collection, NDSU
NP Bridge and Colonists’ Reception House, south from the ferry landing, Frank Jay Haynes, 1877.
Source: Haynes Foundation, Montana Historical Society
The new railroad bridge across the Mississippi River at this point was finally completed yesterday, the last rail being laid at about six o’clock last night, after which that beautiful structure was submitted to a very severe test, in fact the strain put upon it was as great as could possibly be brought to bear, and with the following very flattering results to the buildings: A single engine was first run over by Mr. T. J. DeLamere, Sup’t. Towne’s very gentlemanly assistant, stopping in the middle of each span while deflection was measured by Mr. Brady, foreman of the construction corps, after which he ran back and coupled to a second engine, running over the back as before, when a third engine and the N. P. tool car—the heaviest car on the line—were coupled on and ran over and back as was the first, making a total weight of about 140 tons, and the following is the result of the measurement: greatest deflection with one engine, three-fourths of an inch—return, five-eighths; greatest deflection with two engines, one inch and one-fourth—return, one inch and one-eighth; greatest deflection with three engines, one and one half inches—return, one inch and three-eighths, from which it will be seen that the whole returned, after the weight of the three engines and car was removed, to within one-eighth of an inch of its original position, which (in a structure of that length the longest span being 143 feet) is a very small allowance for the settling together of the joints of the timbers in finding their positive bearings; so that it is quite evident there was no permanent deflection whatever beyond that, and after the rods have been screwed up today and the second test applied the deflection cannot exceed three-fourths of an inch with that weight. Among those who exhibited their courageous proclivities and earned the high honor of “going over on the first engine” were Mr. and Mrs. W. H. Lewis and son, Miss Agnes Campbell, Miss Mary Chapman, Miss Fannie Robinson, Miss Ella Smith, and Messrs. W. A. Smith, A. O. Canfield, and the Tribune reporter.
When the test of the two and three locomotives coupled together came to be applied, however, we were forsaken by some of the faint hearts—who “wanted to go home”—but Miss Campbell and Mrs. Lewis remained on board until the test was completed. (Brainerd Tribune, Saturday, 01 April 1876, p. 1, c. 3)

01 April
We open our columns just before going to press to another horrible accident this (Saturday) afternoon on the fatal railroad bridge here, by which James Hopkins, formerly of this place, lately a resident of Moorhead, Minn., comes to his death. He was at work tearing down the old trestle bridge when a heavy stock of timber fell a distance of about thirty feet striking him on the head. At this writing he still breathes, but cannot live to exceed an hour. He leaves a wife and three children. (Brainerd Tribune, 01 April 1876, p. 1, c. 3)

THE railroad company have changed their time for leaving Brainerd going east, from 6:10 to 5:45 a. m., owing to the rough road between here and the Junction caused by the frost coming out of the ground. (Brainerd Tribune, 01 April 1876, p. 1, c. 7)

As we presumed in our last, James Hopkins, the victim of the sad accident on the railroad bridge at this point on Saturday last, did not live an hour after he was struck. His wife reached here on the Monday night train, and his funeral took place on Tuesday. It is stated that the men near him at the time of the accident saw the timber falling and called to him to get out of the way, and that he apparently thought they were "April Fooling" him and did not move, though he might have done so and avoided the blow. Another victim to this very silly custom. (Brainerd Tribune, 08 April 1876, p. 1, c. 7)

DR. ROSSER received a handsome present this week from an unknown friend, in the shape of a beautiful microscope. It affords truly wonderful sights from very small and ordinary objects; even the editor of the Detroit Record would attain quite fair proportions under its lens. (Brainerd Tribune, 01 April 1876, p. 1, c. 7)

05 April

THE BRAINERD BRIDGE.


The traveling public will be pleased to learn that the somewhat noted Brainerd bridge has been fully completed and opened for travel. Although erected in a remarkably short time it has withstood the several tests to which it has been subjected, without displaying a single objectionable feature. It proved perfectly satisfactory to the powers that be. (Minneapolis Tribune, 05 April 1876, p. 4)

06 April
THREE trains with the necessary equipments left Fargo Thursday morning for the purpose of raising the blockade on the Dakota west of Jimtown [Jamestown]. (Brainerd Dispatch, 08 April 1876, p. 1, c. 5)

08 April
ECONOMY is the watchword of the new administration on the St. Paul & Pacific railroad under President Earley. In addition to twenty-nine employees discharged on Saturday last, on Monday one brakeman from each train was discharged, and each conductor is hereafter to perform, in addition to his own regular duties, the duty of the discharged brakeman. (Brainerd Tribune, 08 April 1876, p. 1, c. 4)

BOOM LAKE BRANCH.
_____


We learn through Mr. E. H. Bly, of this city, that the N. P. officials at New York have rejected his proposition to have a track laid on the Boom Lake branch to his mill; which is, in our opinion, not only an unwise action upon the part of the company for the interest of the road but also very unfortunate for the interests of Brainerd. Mr. Bly proposed to the company that he would rebuild the entire grade, which has become badly demolished and washed out in places, furnish the ties, and build the culverts and trestle work necessary to reach his mill, and that he would enlarge his mill, put in larger boilers and engine and build a dryer and planing mill in addition thereto at a total cost of over $12,000, provided the company would furnish the iron and lay the track. The company it seems to us has old iron unfit for other than such uses, that has been taken out in places on the road because it is partly worn out, amply sufficient for this purpose; and the cost of laying it would not exceed $300, which would be a mere trifle compared with the increase in freight it would afford the road saying nothing of the additional advantage of building up one of its principal towns. In lieu of this the company offers to sell the old iron to Mr. Bly at a low rate, which would add at least $4,000 to his investment, an outlay he does not feel justified in making. In consequence of this he has not only abandoned his project of enlarging his mill, but will not run it at all this summer, and anticipates taking the machinery he has here to Crookston.
This action on the part of the company seems doubly short-sighted in view of the facts that Brainerd is destined with the progress of the road—situated as it is on the Mississippi river, and thus in direct connection with the great pine forests of the north—to become THE great lumber manufacturing point on the road; that Boom Lake will be the inevitable location of our mills; that this branch was graded years ago for this very purpose; and that the final consummation of these things rests only upon the question of a little time, governed largely in its limits by the action and co-operation of the company. As it is, lumber cannot be sawed here to compete with other mills on the line to which tracks are laid, (in every instance we believe to their very doors) for the reason that the cost of drayage from the mill to the road would exceed the profits on its manufacture. We of course do not understand why the company takes the action in this matter it does, but we certainly think if the matter was thoroughly understood by the directors in all its phases their action would be re-considered in very short metre.
In referring to this as we do, we are impelled by our interest in the future of Brainerd, in building up her business and establishing her prime objective—that of a lumber manufacturing centre, and in the interests of the road in building up freight and other business by encouraging the development of manufacturing and other enterprises on its line.
In conclusion, if we were permitted to suggest a remedy in this case we would say, let the L. S. & P. S. Co., being largely interested in Brainerd, step in now and supply the missing link by purchasing the iron of the company and secure the track at once; thus securing the improvements here Mr. Bly proposes to make, and opening up and establishing permanently this branch of industry in our midst. The result is plain—property will increase in value here many times the amount of this paltry investment, sales will be enlarged, and the place will take a stride ahead that it will take years to make without it. (Brainerd Tribune, 08 April 1876, p. 1, c. 6)

SEE: 17 May 1871

THOS. H. CANFIELD has resigned the position he has held for the past five or six years, that of President of the Lake Superior & Puget Sound Land Co., and George Stark, vice president of the Northern Pacific has been appointed in his place. Our townsman, L. P. White, still retains the local agency of the company here. Mr. Canfield will personally supervise the working of his mammoth farms on the N. P. this summer, and is now building a large barn at Lake Park and making preparations for putting in his crops. Mr. L. P. White has purchased for him over 1200 bushels of wheat for seed and ten span of heavy farm horses. There will be some wheat raised on the N. P. this summer if the grasshoppers behave themselves—probably more on the farms of Mr. Canfield, Oliver Dalrymple and Gen. Hawley alone than in the whole New England states united. (Brainerd Tribune, 08 April 1876, p. 1, c. 7)

ON DIT.—That Fred. Sweetman, conductor on the Dakota Division, J. G. Pinkerton, train dispatcher at Brainerd, and John Powers, locomotive engineer, have severed their connection with the road this week. We have not learned who their successors are to be. (Brainerd Tribune, 08 April 1876, p. 1, c. 7)

Captain A. R. Russell and John S. Seger passed west this week en route for the Red River of the North, to be on hand when navigation opens to take charge of their boats to run between Moorhead and Fort Garry. They expect a heavy business on this line the coming season. (Brainerd Tribune, 08 April 1876, p. 1, c. 7)

NOTE: Aaron R. Russell is the brother of Morris C. Russell, founder of the Brainerd Tribune.

10 April
THE mixed train going west from here on Monday ran into a wash-out near Glyndon, ditching the engine and all the freight cars, the baggage and passenger cars only remaining on the track. Sup’t. Towne was soon upon the spot and had the track cleared, but the engine and freight cars, seven in number, still lie in the ditch, the wrecking car and tools being out in Dakota. Geo. Dow the conductor, states that $10.00 will cover all damage to freight, and that the engine and cars are only slightly damaged, and that fortunately there was no one hurt. He informed us that a man living at Glyndon, of full age, and otherwise not apparently insane or a villain, told him after the disaster that he passed over the place washed out in the road less than a half an hour before and that when he heard the train coming, he climbed up on the roof of his house to see it run over—he thought it would jump it. This is certain to be the dumbest case in Christendom, heartbreak or hell for the fool-killer, and if he engages that benefactor long enough we will be under many obligations to him if he should send us his photograph and name—we should like to frame them. (Brainerd Tribune, 15 April 1876, p. 1, c. 7)

11 April
THE snow bucking outfit on the Dakota Division reached Bismarck on Tuesday night, leaving the road clear of snow behind them once more, but they had no more than cleared the track of snow when a bridge near Fourteenth Siding was carried away by the water leaving a breach in the road that it will take several days to heal. Sup’t. Towne and the bridge crew have gone to the scene of the disaster, and it will be speedily repaired, and it is hoped that trains will be running regularly on that division very soon, though it does appear that the old adage, “Misfortunes never come singly,” is proving itself with this road of late. (Brainerd Tribune, 15 April 1876, p. 1, c. 7)

15 April
GEN. T. L. ROSSER, brother of Dr. J. C. Rosser of this city, has been elected city engineer of the city of Minneapolis. (Brainerd Tribune, 15 April 1876, p. 1, c. 5)

SEE: 14 December 1871
SEE: 29 February 1872
SEE: 20 July 1872
SEE: 25 October 1872
SEE: 26 October 1872
SEE: 14 February 1873
SEE: 01 March 1873
SEE: 18 March 1873
SEE: 02 August 1873
SEE: 23 August 1873
SEE: 25 October 1873

SEE: 22 July 1876
SEE: 28 October 1876

SEE: 06 January 1877
SEE: 17 March 1877
SEE: 25 April 1877
SEE: 30 April 1877
SEE: 05 May 1877
SEE: 12 May 1877
SEE: 17 May 1877
SEE: 26 May 1877
SEE: 06 June 1877
SEE: 21 July 1877
SEE: 11 August 1877
SEE: 29 August 1877
SEE: 15 September 1877
SEE: 25 October 1877
SEE: 08 November 1877
SEE: 22 December 1877
SEE: 26 February 1878
SEE: 15 June 1878
SEE: 06 July 1878
SEE: 17 August 1878
SEE: 24 August 1878
SEE: 23 January 1879
SEE: 25 January 1879
SEE: 11 March 1879
SEE: 15 March 1879
SEE: 05 April 1879
SEE: 12 April 1879
SEE: 24 May 1879
SEE: 06 December 1879
SEE: 13 December 1879
SEE: 27 December 1879

21 April
A SPECIAL train arrived in this city yesterday evening from the east bringing the following N. P. R. R. officials: Gen. Geo. Stark, vice president, and his son J. F. Stark, of New York; W. S. Alexander, general freight agent, and H. A. Towne, general superintendent and lady; also, Thos. H. Canfield, ex-vice president, and L. P. White, local agent of the L. S. & P. S. Co. The party will remain in town until this evening, when they will proceed west inspecting matters on the line to Bismarck. (Brainerd Tribune, 22 April 1876, p. 1, c. 6)

22 April
WE are pleased to notice that freight and travel on the Northern Pacific is increasing very rapidly and bids fair to be larger this season than ever before. The Dakota Division is now open to Bismarck and trains run regularly the whole length of the road (see new time card in another column) and the rush to the front—the Black Hills, Montana, and Manitoba—is simply enormous. Parties east bound for the Black Hills are beginning to learn that this is by large odds the shortest, safest and cheapest route; shortest from Chicago by nearly 200 miles; the safest because there is nearly 200 miles less staging by this than any other route and consequently less difficulty with the Indians (as yet no Indians have molested this route) and the parties from Bismarck are larger and consequently afford better protection—and it is the cheapest, the railroad fare being only $31 for first-class and $25 for second class passage from Chicago to Bismarck, which is within 195 miles of the Hills.
The passenger cars going west are crowded every day, while freight is accumulating faster than it can be forwarded, the yard here being completely crowded with loaded cars of freight—largely bonded goods for Manitoba—and still it comes from all directions. The Dubuque Herald of last Sunday says, “The steamer Savanna, on her way from St. Louis to St. Paul, has an enormous quantity of freight in tow. Four hundred tons of it is composed of assorted goods for Montana Territory, which will be taken to St. Paul and transferred to the Northern Pacific cars for Bismarck.” The N. P. officials say, “let it come,” and so say we all. (Brainerd Tribune, 22 April 1876, p. 1, c. 4)

GEN’L. [MANAGER] C. W. MEAD, late manager of the Northern Pacific railroad, has been appointed General Superintendent of the Missouri Pacific. (Brainerd Tribune, 22 April 1876, p. 1, c. 6)

TO PARENTS.—That we may prevent the possibility of accident to any of the children who have occasion to cross the railroad, or who are in the habit of playing around the cars, I hereby earnestly request that parents take immediate occasion to caution their children in this particular. Trainmen are prohibited from allowing any children to ride on the cars, or assist them in any way; and I trust parents will observe their part of a duty so essential.
H. A. TOWNE, Sup’t.
(Brainerd Tribune, 22 April 1876, p. 1, c. 7)

29 April

THE ST. PAUL & PACIFIC BRANCH AND
THE GILMAN BILL.


The Alexandria Post, referring to the Brainerd and St. Vincent Branches of the St. Paul & Pacific railroad, very pertinently says: “These lines pass through some of the richest timbered and agricultural portions of the State—the most attractive and beautiful parts of the fair northwest. Throughout the whole extent of this wide region, improvements have been steadily going on, and in patient expectation the people have waited from year to year for the fulfillment of the contract on which their hopes and prosperity are founded. Deluded by specious and oft broken promises, their patience is now well nigh exhausted. That a wrong has been done these people, there can be no question. The railroads’ legacy, guaranteed to them years ago, are not yet completed; and, to make the matter still worse, schemes are proposed which violate law and contracts and look to an entire abandonment of the branch lines.
The spirit of the Gilman railroad bill is right; and all denunciation of its supporters is irrelevant. That such legislation should become necessary to attain the ends of justice is to be regretted, and it is equally to be regretted that the state of society is such that laws to prevent and punish crime and enforce the performance of contracts make the larger part of all our statutes.”
Aye, and it is to be regretted that our legislature has so long deferred its action of last winter, or similar action, in this matter, and it is equally to be regretted that if possible more stringent measures were not adopted.
We can recall an instance, and but one, where the public has been imposed upon, deceived, defrauded, swindled, bamboozled, humbugged, in fact put through the whole category of nasty imposition and had them rubbed in to an absolute demonstration with more than impunity for years, and that instance is the persistent delay in the fulfillment of the contract for the construction of the Brainerd and St. Vincent Branches, though extension after extension to the charter has been granted and every favor bestowed and inducement offered within the reach of a deluded people, upon the fair promises and protestations of the company, made only for the purpose of gaining their ends and not with any regard whatever for their consummation.
But there is said to be an end to all things, a time when forbearance ceases to be a virtue or even a possibility, and that time has arrived in the St. Paul & Pacific branch line business; and an amendment to our statute of frauds has become a necessity which the Gilman railroad bill is intended to supply, and it can only fail in constitutionality, and is only objectionable in that it is not severe and strict enough. (Brainerd Tribune, 29 April 1876, p. 1, c. 4)

THE Bill granting eight years additional time to the Northern Pacific Railroad Company in which to complete their road, has fortunately passed both houses of Congress. (Brainerd Tribune, 29 April 1876, p. 1, c. 4)

VICE PRESIDENT STARK, of the Northern Pacific, while in Brainerd this week, personally inspected the matter of Mr. Bly’s application to have a track laid to his mill on Boom Lake, and re-considered the previous action rejecting the application, and gave instructions to have it built at once, and grading has accordingly already been commenced. Mr. Bly, owing to the lateness of the season, cannot put in the improvements now that he proposed and that we recited in speaking of this subject two weeks since, but will run his mill as it is this summer and add them next spring. This is certainly good news for Brainerd and looks to the era of better times. Three cheers and a tiger for President Stark. (Brainerd Tribune, 29 April 1876, p. 1, c. 7)

FREIGHT and passenger travel is steadily increasing on the Northern Pacific, and is simply enormous. At this rate what will it be when the lake navigation opens to Duluth. (Brainerd Tribune, 29 April 1876, p. 1, c. 7)

02 May
WE are credibly informed that E. C. G. Stahlman, a son of John Stahlman, of St. Paul, who stopped overnight here on Tuesday night was victimized by Shang and his pals in a game of three card monte, losing what money he had with him, about $70, and his watch. We had supposed that game to be sufficiently well known, in this country especially, to entirely exclude the possibility of the existence of one so green as to be trapped by it. But it appears suckers still bite at bait the most stale, and occasionally one gets out without his mother’s knowledge and gets caught. We must say our pity for him or anyone else so verdant is extremely limited. A communication in another column from one of our citizens refers to these parties and infers, we think erroneously, that they have plied their vocation on the N. P. railroad trains. It is possible our correspondent, is correct, but we are inclined to think not. Certainly, if they have, it has been without the knowledge and contrary to the orders of the officials. At all events where are our magistrates and officers whose duty it is to correct immorality and punish them? “Let no guilty man escape.”
LATER—Since writing the above, we learn that young Stahlman’s is only one case of many where they have victimized the poor, unwary simpleton in this place in the last two weeks to the tune (it is estimated by those having an opportunity to know pretty well) some six hundred dollars in the aggregate. They took their departure yesterday morning for new fields as “game is up” here for a while. (Brainerd Tribune, 06 May 1876, p. 1, c. 7)

06 May
We were likewise premature in stating that the Northern Pacific extension bill had passed the House. It was reported upon favorably by the committee, and will doubtless pass. No fears are entertained for its success. (Brainerd Tribune, 06 May 1876, p. 1, c. 4)

WE are informed that while the N. P. special train was being brought by the Horse Shoe Curve, between Fond du Lac and Thomson, the engine, owing to a pile of wood falling on the road, left the track. Brown, the engineer, reversed his engine, and the conductor set his brakes, stopping the engine such a short distance from the 60 foot precipice, that inches instead of feet would measure the distance. The short distance they ran after getting off the rail, shows that all the men were wide awake to their duty. The Rev. Mr. Millspaugh, who on his way to our place to hold services tomorrow at the Episcopal Church, was lying asleep in the pay car, was awakened by the shock, and undoubtedly surprised by the accident, and thankful for their escape.—[Minnesotian-Herald. (Brainerd Tribune, 06 May 1876, p. 1, c. 5)

THE three card sharps were at the depot the other morning, just before the train started west, and followed a fellow they were trying to “take in” into the car. Geo. Dow, the conductor, was notified of the fact, and he made a bee line for that car with blood in his eye, and opening the car door he shouted, “You d----d thieves, get out of here.” They hesitated, and he collared them, and you had better believe they went out of that car in a hurry. (Brainerd Tribune, 06 May 1876, p. 1, c. 7)

SEE: 07 June 1876
SEE: 22 February 1879

GRADING is progressing rapidly on the track to Bly’s mill, and trains will run over it in two weeks. (Brainerd Tribune, 06 May 1876, p. 1, c. 7)

12 May
CHAS. WILLIAMS, book-keeper at the machine shops, met quite a severe accident yesterday at his office. He was leaning backward in his chair, poising it on two legs, when he lost his balance, and to avoid falling threw his hand back to catch something behind him, striking his wrist, unfortunately, across the edge of a razor in the hands of a man named Sweeney, who chanced to be standing behind him shaving himself, Williams not knowing he was there. The razor entered the joint in the wrist on the under side, severing some of the cords and veins, making an ugly gash and relieving him of a good deal of blood, but how serious it will be is not known, as the doctor is out of town. The wound was dressed by our druggist, N. McFadden, in good shape, and is doing “as well as can be expected.” (Brainerd Tribune, 13 May 1876, p. 1, c. 7)

13 May
TIME on the Northern Pacific railroad will be changed on Sunday the 21st inst. Under the new arrangement the trains will meet here at noon and stop thirty minutes for dinner. It was the intention to make the change to-morrow, but it could not be effected owing to the fact that the L. S. & M. folks have not yet decided what their time will be. (Brainerd Tribune, 13 May 1876, p. 1, c. 7)

20 May
TIME.—The summer arrangement on the Northern Pacific and Lake Superior and Mississippi railroads goes into effect to-morrow (Sunday) at 12 o’clock p. m. On the Northern Pacific, Minnesota Division, passenger trains westward leave Duluth at 3:45 a. m., reach Brainerd at 9 for breakfast, and Fargo at 4:40 p. m.; and eastward leave Fargo at 8 a. m., reaching Brainerd at 2 p. m. for dinner, and Duluth at 8:40, connecting at the Junction, both ways, with the L. S. & M. trains to and from St. Paul, and at Glyndon with trains from Crookston, Minn. On the Dakota Division trains leave Fargo, going west, on Tuesdays, Thursdays and Saturdays, and Bismarck, going east, on Mondays, Wednesdays and Fridays, at 7 a. m.
On the L. S. & M., trains going north leave Minneapolis at 7:30 and St. Paul at 8 p. m., arriving at the N. P. Junction at 4:55, and Duluth at 6:30 a. m., and going south leave Duluth at 6:25, arriving at the Junction at 8 p. m., St. Paul at 5:50 and Minneapolis at 6:20 a. m., connecting at the Junction with N. P. trains both ways, making the time from St. Paul to Fargo only twenty hours. The Brainerd and Duluth Accommodation leaving Brainerd at 4 a. m., connects with the L. S. & M. Day Express at the Junction, which arrives at St. Paul at 5 and Minneapolis at 5:35 p. m., and returning leaves Minneapolis at 7:45 and St. Paul at 8:30 a. m., connecting with the Accommodation at the Junction, which arrives at Brainerd at 9:15 p.m.
Owing to the very low rates fixed for passage down the lakes the coming summer, very many people from the States of Wisconsin, Iowa and Nebraska, the Territories of Dakota, Montana and the country west and the Province of Manitoba visiting the Centennial, will take this route either going or coming, or both, and the passenger traffic over those roads is expected to be larger the coming summer than ever before. So must it be. (Brainerd Tribune, 20 May 1876, p. 1, c. 6)

27 May
CERTAIN parties in our town who visit the Free Reading Room, whose names are withheld at present for good reasons, are in the habit of carrying away papers and periodicals from the room, which is nothing short of petty larceny, and will be publicly exposed and examples made of the thieves if it is not stopped. (Brainerd Tribune, 27 May 1876, p. 1, c. 7)

30 May
A PARTY of surveyors and assistants went west on Tuesday to lay out a town at Swan Creek, to be called Casselton. The town-site is on the ground now occupied by the N. P. nursery and is a beautiful location. Streets are 100 feet wide and trees have already been set out on both sides of the streets in front of eight blocks. Side tracks have been put in and the company will proceed at once to build a depot. Another town is to be laid out near Maple River on Mr. Dunlap’s farm, called Worthington. The company will also put up a depot, tank house and other buildings.—[Fargo Times. (Brainerd Tribune, 03 June 1876, p. 1, c. 6)

03 June
A PIC NIC to the Sunday School of the Congregational Church of this place takes place to-day at Withington [Deerwood], given by Mrs. Col. R. M. Newport, a well-beloved teacher of the school, in view of her intended departure east next week for a pleasure trip, upon her return from which the Col. and his family will take up their abode in Minneapolis, rendering Mrs. Newport’s departure from among us permanent, which will be seriously regretted by our citizens. (Brainerd Tribune, 03 June 1876, p. 1, c. 7)

NEWPORT:
SEE: 17 August 1872
SEE: 26 April 1873
SEE: 12 December 1874
SEE: 19 December 1874
SEE: 09 October 1875
SEE: 29 January 1876
SEE: 19 February 1876
SEE: 25 April 1877
SEE: 06 June 1877
SEE: 09 June 1877
SEE: 14 June 1877
SEE: 06 October 1877
SEE: 07 February 1880
SEE: 17 February 1881
SEE: 26 February 1881
SEE: 17 March 1881
SEE: 09 April 1881
SEE: 13 April 1881
SEE: 30 April 1881
SEE: 19 May 1881
SEE: 23 July 1881
SEE: 11 February 1882
SEE: 18 February 1882
SEE: 30 July 1882
SEE: 05 February 1917

From the Moorhead Star, June 3rd.
WE have the best of authority for stating the Dakota Division will be open next winter. Gen. Stark has given orders for the usual preparation—the building of snow fences, Mr. Bly of Brainerd, having the contract for the material. The track through the smallest cuts is to be raised to obviate the necessity of fences, but around the deeper excavations a double line of high picket fence is to be placed. (Brainerd Tribune, 10 June 1876, p. 4, c. 2)

07 June

A FATAL RAILROAD ACCIDENT
ON THE N. P. R. R.
_____


On Wednesday morning last at about ten o’clock our quiet little town was startled by the terrible report coming flashing over the wires that the passenger train, then an hour past due here from Duluth, had gone through a burning bridge across the Tamarac river, about 55 miles east of Brainerd, at 6:50 o’clock that morning, killing the baggage-master, Hugh Kilpatrick, wounding the engineer, W. G. Wheeler, who would probably die, and injuring some of the passengers and others of the trainmen. The horrible details of the Brainerd bridge disaster of scarcely a year ago at once flashed vividly across the mind, sending a sickening horror to the heart of all who heard it, which was greatly intensified by the fact that was only a freight train, while this was a passenger train, freighted with probably a hundred human lives. Beyond these meager details nothing could be learned of the extent of the wreck, the injuries received, or the names of the wounded. An engine and caboose was at once dispatched from Duluth, carrying doctors Walbank and McCormick, of that place, to the scene, and a train consisting of two coaches, baggage car, wrecking car, and the pay car containing berths for the wounded, carrying Sup’t. H. A. Towne, Master Mechanic W. H. Lewis, Col. R. M. Newport, J. W. Edgerton, C. F. Kindred, Dr. T. H. Ward, Mrs. Wheeler, the wife of the unfortunate engineer, and a number of others of our citizens, who went prepared to render any assistance in their power to the wounded and dying, was ordered from here. Upon this we took passage to visit the scene and obtain the “exact facts” for the readers of the TRIBUNE. We soon reached the point of disaster where we met the sad tale that poor Gib Wheeler, the engineer, was killed instantly, and that the telegram was worded to convey the impression that he was not dead in order to break the news not too suddenly to his wife and friends. But we fear that what was intended as a kindness proved an injury to the stricken wife, now a widow, for upon learning her husband’s fate after having been held in suspense between hope and fear so long, her extreme agony was indeed heartrending to witness. We next directed our attention to

THE WOUNDED,

and fortunately found they were not as many as we had anticipated, that their injuries, in every instance, were very slight, no bones being broken, and all being able to walk about quite comfortably. They were as follows: Larry Welsh, of Brainerd, fireman, neck, left arm and hand, scalded; C. M. Tennis, of West Brainerd, Mail Route Agent, a scalp wound and bruised about the arm and shoulder; George H. Lewis, of St. Paul, Mail Route Agent, a bruised leg and arm; George Dow, Conductor, hand scratched, forehead and hip bruised; Thomas Faugh, Express Route Agent, face, head and limbs bruised, and Col. C. A. Lounsberry, a slight cut on the left hand. Beyond this, no one was hurt, and all were feeling thankful their lives were spared.

THE CAUSE.

The accident was caused, as stated above, by the bridge being on fire—it was an ordinary pile bridge, about 125 feet long, situated at the end of a short curve running through a cut, where a train approaching from the east could not possibly sight it fifteen rail lengths off. A close inspection showed that the tops of the piles supporting the north chord were all burned, some of them entirely off; the caps resting on the piles and supporting this chord were all burned, and many of them entirely through; the chord was almost entirely consumed the whole length of the bridge, particularly where it crossed the caps, and the ties were burned where they touched the chord, and many of them burned off. Enough, and barely enough of the timbers remained to keep the track nearly up to grade; being supported by the few ties that were not entirely consumed, and making a complete trap—the bridge would doubtless have fallen itself in an hour longer. The origin of the fire is not known, but is supposed to have been occasioned by cinders falling from the fire box of the engine pulling the passenger train of the night previous that passed over it about six o’clock. If not this, it was the work of an incendiary. In either case, however, no reasonable precaution could have prevented the accident and no blame can possibly attach to the management or employees of the road. It was utterly impossible to have stopped the train after the fire was discovered, in so short a distance, though the engineer and brakeman died at their posts in their efforts to do so and to their noble and heroic action are the passengers chiefly indebted for their lives.

THE WRECK.

The skeleton of the engine (No. 42) lay on the west bank, about twenty feet from the track, its full size embedded in the mud (which was as soft as mortar) literally broken to smash. The head-light was thrown in one direction, the cab roof in another and the tender lay in another. At the end where the cab should have been was a hole in the mud where, we were told, the engineer was found, buried five feet under ground, of sand, with the fireman standing on him buried to his neck. The baggage and mail car laid on its side in the stream, one end on the west bank, telescoped by the tender, the second class coach laid with the forward end in the stream, telescoped by the baggage car and partially resting on it and the rear end on the bridge, while the first class coach was fortunately stopped before it left the track and was “right side up with care.”
The mail and express matter was very much damaged by getting wet but nothing lost.

THE KILLED.

W. G. Wheeler, the engineer, was a native of Osseo, Trempealeau county, Wisconsin and a resident of Brainerd, about 29 years of age, highly respected by his fellow laborers and all who knew him and a worthy member of the Brotherhood of Locomotive Engineers. He leaves a wife, infant son and brother here, beside numerous relatives and friends at his native home, to mourn their loss.
Hugh Kilpatrick, the baggage-man, resided at Brainerd, was a single man about 25 years of age, and a member of Northern Light Lodge No. 26, of I. O. O. F., at Fargo, D. T., a man of good habits and attentive to business. He leaves a sister, who once lived here with a Mrs. Finley, but has since married and removed to Watertown, N. Y., where she at present resides. Rev. R. Wainwright, who was onboard, kindly attended to washing, dressing and laying out the bodies, and they were brought to Brainerd on the return train.
On Friday Wheeler was taken, accompanied by his wife and brother, to his home in Wisconsin, where his funeral services will be held, and on the same day Kilpatrick’s remains were taken to Fargo there to be buried under the auspices of his Lodge.

THE INQUEST.

On Thursday a coroner’s inquest was called by the coroner of Carlton county, that being the county in which the accident occurred, and the coroner and jury personally visited the scene of the disaster, came to Brainerd and viewed the bodies and took the testimony of the principal witnesses, and returned the following verdict:

VERDICT OF CORONER’S JURY.
N. P. JUNCTION, June 9, 1876.

The jury, after a careful investigation, find that the engineer, Gilbert Wheeler, and baggage-master, Hugh Kilpatrick, came to their deaths by the wrecking of a passenger train at a crossing of Tamarac river, on the Northern Pacific railroad. That the cause of wrecking of said train was the partial burning of the bridge across the Tamarac River during the night of the sixth (6th) of June, 1876, between the time of trains passing this point and between the hours of the section patrol, and that there was no negligence on the part of any officers or employees of said Railroad Company, and that the accident was wholly unavoidable.
Signed.
JOHN G. WILLIAMS, Coroner.
JAS. M. PAINE,
L. W. GREENE,
W. DUNLAP,
JOS. BURGOYNE,
H. W. McNAIR,
H. D. WIARD, JURORS.
(Brainerd Tribune, 10 June 1876, p. 1, c.’s 5 & 6)

KINDRED:
SEE: 07 November 1874
SEE: 14 November 1874
SEE: 28 November 1874
SEE: 19 February 1876
SEE: 23 March 1878
SEE: 28 September 1878
SEE: 18 January 1879
SEE: 31 May 1879
SEE: 27 September 1879
SEE: 26 June 1880
SEE: 31 August 1880
SEE: 09 December 1880
SEE: 25 December 1880
SEE: 17 February 1881
SEE: 21 February 1881
SEE: 09 April 1881
SEE: 13 April 1881
SEE: 23 April 1881
SEE: 19 May 1881
SEE: 11 June 1881
SEE: 23 July 1881
SEE: 03 October 1881
SEE: 06 December 1881
SEE: 30 July 1882
SEE: 02 August 1882
SEE: 20 September 1883
SEE: 23 September 1883
SEE: 26 August 1885
SEE: 13 December 1887
SEE: 31 May 1889
SEE: 25 March 1898
SEE: 05 February 1917

DOW
SEE: 06 May 1876
SEE: 22 February 1879

10 June
THE “Brainerd Branch” ghost received its regular periodical exhumation last week, and was paraded, as usual, on stilts and in rose colored attire to the public gaze; and received its customary boost back to the land of skeletons. (Brainerd Tribune, 10 June 1876, p. 1, c. 7)

CHANGE of time on the Northern Pacific goes into effect to-morrow (Sunday) under which the passenger trains leave Fargo, going east, at 10:30 a. m., arrive at Brainerd at 5:15, depart at 5:45, arrive at the Junction at 9:50, and Duluth at 11:30 p. m., connecting at Junction with the L. S. & M. The time westward and on the Dakota Division is unchanged. On the Lake Superior & Mississippi the night express, going south, leaves Duluth at 8:30 and the Junction at 10:00 p. m., arriving at St. Paul at 6:00 a. m., and going north leaves St. Paul at 8:00 p. m., arriving at the Junction at 4:55 and Duluth at 6:20 a. m., connecting at the Junction, both ways, with the N. P. passenger trains. (Brainerd Tribune, 10 June 1876, p. 1, c. 7)

17 June
THE wounded in the late railroad bridge disaster are all as “good as new” again. (Brainerd Tribune, 17 June 1876, p. 1, c. 7)

21 June
G. G. SANBORN; formerly General Ticket Agent of the Northern Pacific railroad, spent Wednesday in town, returning in the evening to St. Paul. W. S. Alexander has tendered his resignation to the company to take effect on July 1st, and Mr. Sanborn has accepted the appointment as his successor, thus virtually returning to his old position, and while the departure of Mr. Alexander will be deeply regretted the return of Mr. Sanborn to the Northern Pacific corps will be hailed with delight by many warm friends. (Brainerd Tribune, 24 June 1876, p. 1, c. 7)

24 June
HENRY DOUGLASS, a colored porter on a sleeping car on the L. S. & M. road attempted the murder of George Eastwood, a brakeman on the same train, while en route from Duluth to St. Paul, striking him over the head with an iron poker and afterwards stabbing him with a knife seven times. The cause was an old grudge. Douglass was arrested and taken to Stillwater for examination. Eastwood it is thought will recover, though it is by no means certain. (Brainerd Tribune, 24 June 1876, p. 1, c. 6)

H. A. TOWNE, Sup’t., M. C. Kimberley, Resident Engineer, and S. J. Wallace, Sup’t. of Bridges of the Northern Pacific, made a trip over the Dakota Division last week, locating snow fences on the deep cuts, planning a raise of the grade on others, making estimates, etc., preparatory to putting that portion of the road in condition for winter traffic. Bismarck is no longer to be shut out from the world six months in the year. (Brainerd Tribune, 24 June 1876, p. 1, c. 7)

WE understand the R. R. folks offer to attach a safe walk to the railroad bridge across the river here, if the people or anybody else will furnish the lumber. Will our citizens move in this matter. (Brainerd Tribune, 24 June 1876, p. 1, c. 7)

22 July

Construction of the Northern Pa-
cific Railroad, the Best Means
to Settle the Indian Question.
_____


A Duluth correspondent to the Pioneer-Press and Tribune very truthfully says:
“It seems to me that the very best means to settle this Indian question in the northwest cheaply and permanently, is for the government to extend a helping hand to the Northern Pacific Railroad Company, and enable them to push its way to completion at the earliest possible day. Why is it that a work of such great national importance should be allowed (mainly through the opposition and jealousy of a rival road subsidized by the government into a great and oppressive monopoly) to languish for the want of such encouragement as the government could rightfully bestow, and by the creation of a competitive road help break down the monopoly created by itself, and relieve the people of an enormous burden? How few people have an adequate idea of the extent and resources of the magnificent empire of the great northwest, which is destined to be the Mecca or promised land to which the overburdened population of the east must look for help. Could the New England farmers, who patiently and toilsomely grub among the rocks on their hillsides in a seven by nine field, hardly big enough to turn a yoke of oxen in, be transported along the Northern Pacific Road, and see some of the immense farms, where a plowman when he starts his team in the early morning to plow around his field, straps his camp equipage on the horns of his oxen, and, shouldering his gun, with compass in hand, he kisses his wife and babies good-bye—or could they see the miles on miles in straight unbroken line of golden wheat waving and ripening in the sunshine, that will yield thirty to forty bushels per acre, it would make their hearts jump for joy and their eyes twinkle and blink like a toad winking in a thunder storm.” (Brainerd Tribune, 22 July 1876, p. 1, c. 4)

FROM J. B. Power, ESQ., Gen’l. Agent of the Land Department of the Northern Pacific Railroad we learn that the lands sold at the office here during the month of June, 1876, amount to 42,361 acres, making the grand total of sales to June 30th, 1876, 687,128.40 acres for the enormous sum of $3,293,951.09. (Brainerd Tribune, 22 July 1876, p. 1, c. 7)

POWER:
SEE: 05 October 1871
SEE: 01 April 1873
SEE: 03 May 1873
SEE: 01 December 1873
SEE: 27 December 1873
SEE: 10 January 1874
SEE: 06 June 1874
SEE: 12 September 1874
SEE: 28 November 1874
SEE: 06 February 1875
SEE: 20 March 1875
SEE: 12 April 1875
SEE: 07 August 1875
SEE: 09 October 1875
SEE: 19 February 1876
SEE: 07 October 1876
SEE: 25 April 1877
SEE: 14 June 1877
SEE: 04 August 1877
SEE: 06 October 1877
SEE: 23 October 1877
SEE: 02 November 1877
SEE: 18 June 1878
SEE: 20 July 1878
SEE: 06 August 1878
SEE: 21 September 1878
SEE: 28 September 1878
SEE: 10 May 1879
SEE: 05 July 1879
SEE: 30 July 1879
SEE: 27 September 1879
SEE: 18 February 1880
SEE: 21 February 1880
SEE: 28 August 1880
SEE: 31 August 1880
SEE: 04 September 1880
SEE: 16 September 1880
SEE: 09 October 1880
SEE: 09 December 1880
SEE: 25 December 1880
SEE: 17 February 1881
SEE: 21 February 1881
SEE: 26 February 1881
SEE: 09 April 1881
SEE: 13 April 1881
SEE: 23 April 1881
SEE: 19 May 1881
SEE: 11 June 1881
SEE: 23 July 1881
SEE: 01 September 1881
SEE: 03 October 1881
SEE: 06 December 1881
SEE: 30 July 1882
SEE: 02 August 1882
SEE: 05 February 1917

Gen. Rosser writes as follows to the Minneapolis Tribune: “I knew Gen. Custer well; have known him intimately from boyhood, and, being on opposite sides during the late war, we often met and measured strength on the fields of Virginia, and I can truly say now that I never met a more enterprising, gallant, or dangerous an enemy during those four years of terrible war, or a more genial, whole-souled, chivalrous gentleman and friend in peace than Maj. Gen. George A. Custer.” (Brainerd Tribune, 22 July 1876, p. 2, c. 1)

ROSSER:
SEE: 14 December 1871
SEE: 29 February 1872
SEE: 20 July 1872
SEE: 25 October 1872
SEE: 26 October 1872
SEE: 14 February 1873
SEE: 01 March 1873
SEE: 18 March 1873
SEE: 02 August 1873
SEE: 23 August 1873
SEE: 25 October 1873
SEE: 15 April 1876
SEE: 28 October 1876
SEE: 06 January 1877
SEE: 17 March 1877
SEE: 25 April 1877
SEE: 30 April 1877
SEE: 05 May 1877
SEE: 12 May 1877
SEE: 17 May 1877
SEE: 26 May 1877
SEE: 06 June 1877
SEE: 21 July 1877
SEE: 11 August 1877
SEE: 29 August 1877
SEE: 15 September 1877
SEE: 25 October 1877
SEE: 08 November 1877
SEE: 22 December 1877
SEE: 26 February 1878
SEE: 15 June 1878
SEE: 06 July 1878
SEE: 17 August 1878
SEE: 24 August 1878
SEE: 23 January 1879
SEE: 25 January 1879
SEE: 11 March 1879
SEE: 15 March 1879
SEE: 05 April 1879
SEE: 12 April 1879
SEE: 24 May 1879
SEE: 06 December 1879
SEE: 13 December 1879
SEE: 27 December 1879

29 July

St. Paul & Pacific.
_____


A report of the Amsterdam committee in regard to the St. Paul & Pacific railroad states that a reduction of $60,000 a year in expenses has been made by the new management; that the president judges it necessary to lay a track from the western terminus of the main line at Breckenridge northward to the junction of the Northern Pacific and the St. Vincent extension at Glyndon (40 miles); that the earnings are increasing, 5,000 families having settled along the line last spring; that $1,812,690.66 in bonds and coupons were canceled in eighteen months by being accepted in payment for lands; that the difficulties between the First Division of the St. Paul & Pacific railroad company, the St. Vincent and Brainerd extensions and the Northern Pacific will probably be settled this year, that the percentage of increase on the two lines for ten months, from July to April, was on the main line 35.8 per cent. Branch line 5.5 percent.
During April last the land department sold 240 acres of branch line lands, 200 at $5 and 40 at $4 an acre, while it in the same month sold 12,628 1-2 acres of main line lands, at an average price of $6.41 per acre.—[N. Y. R. R. Gazette.
The recommendation of the president that the forty miles from Breckenridge to Glyndon be built is very fortunately rendered void by the Gilman railroad law, and we trust those interested in this matter will see to it that legislators are elected this fall who will oppose its repeal. The Todd County Argus makes this measure its prime issue in the coming campaign, and a very good issue it is too. Let the counties of Crow Wing, Morrison, Benton, Sherburne, Mille Lacs, Anoka, Hennepin, Wright, Stearns, Todd, Pope, Douglass, Grant, Otter Tail, Wilkin, Clay, Becker, Wadena, Cass and Aitkin consider this their main interest and vote solid only for men pledged to support the Gilman law. (Brainerd Tribune, 29 July 1876, p. 1, c. 3)

01 August
Mrs. Gen’l. G. A. Custer and other ladies, widows of the killed in the horrible Custer massacre, passed east this week, Tuesday, in a special car very kindly furnished by Sup’t. H. A. Towne for their comfort. As they passed through the town the large flag on the office building at the R. R. machine shops was lowered at half mast. (Brainerd Tribune, 05 August 1876, p. 1, c. 5)

03 August
Supt. H. A. Towne and Master Mechanic W. H. Lewis went west with a special car Thursday morning, on a tour of general inspection over the road to Bismarck. They will also finally perfect their plans for snow-fencing the Dakota Division, for which Mr. Bly has already received orders to saw 100 car loads of fencing. (Brainerd Tribune, 05 August 1876, p. 1, c. 5)

08 August
ELEVEN hundred emigrants—six hundred Mennonites and five hundred Icelanders—arrived in Duluth on Tuesday, and were shipped by special train over the Northern Pacific to Glyndon en route for their new home in Manitoba. The interpreter in charge of the Mennonites, John Koch, is a gentlemanly appearing man of German decent, and resides in Millersville, Ont. (Brainerd Tribune, 12 August 1876, p. 1, c. 7)

16 August
GROWN weary of waiting upon the action of our citizens in the water works business, the railroad officials have tapped their water main near the headquarters buildings instead of running a pipe into the park and attaching their hose connections there as at first proposed to the city, and on Wednesday a test was made of the much argued question of how high the water could be thrown, that must have been at least convincing to those who have so strenuously opposed the measure and so persistently maintained that a stream “could not be thrown six feet high.” The hose was two and one-half inches and the nozzle one and one-fourth inch, and threw the water with ease far above the weather vane on the office building which is over seventy-five feet from the ground. Had the nozzle been about half or three-fourths inch, it would have thrown much higher, but an inch and a quarter stream of water capable of being thrown to that height would answer all practical purposes in this town, and in fact be more effectual than a smaller stream; and the water supply being inexhaustible can easily afford it.
It is proposed now we learn to raise by subscription the amount necessary to purchase about six hundred feet of hose, among those who can be reached by it to connect with the present pipe. The hose will cost, for three-ply, forty-five cents per foot or $270, which with an ordinary hose-cart and a proper storage and dry-house, would not exceed $325 to $350, and of this Mr. Bly alone offers to pay a large proportion and others have agreed to pay their share. Do not delay; chip in and at once, do not wait until the town is burned down, it would be useless then. (Brainerd Tribune, 19 August 1876, p. 1, c. 6)

29 August
M. C. Kimberley has resigned his position as resident engineer of the N. P., to accept a similar position on the Missouri, Kansas & Texas railway at an increased salary, and took his departure with his family for his new quarters on Tuesday last. We regret the circumstances occasioning this change deeply, but hope Mr. Kimberley’s new berth may afford him a sufficient increase of lucre to warrant him in leaving the many friends he has in Brainerd. (Brainerd Tribune, 02 September 1876, p. 1, c. 7)

02 September
Joseph Dilworth, Springer Harbaugh, W. S. Bissell, Jas. H. Swett, A. M. Marshall, David S. Bissell, and Lawrence Dilworth, all of Pittsburgh, Pa., passed west over the Northern Pacific this week, intending to visit Bismarck ere they returned. Mr. Joseph Dilworth is one of the directors of the N. P., and the others of the party are among the heaviest bondholders of the road. They were armed and equipped for a raid on chickens, intending to combine a little pleasure with their business—their first tour of inspection over the road they hold so heavy an interest in. They are all agreeable, courteous gentlemen, deeply interested in the people and enterprises along the line, and apparently well pleased with the manner in which their interests are being attended to. (Brainerd Tribune, 02 September 1876, p. 1, c. 7)

16 September
WE were shown through the Northern Pacific Business Car one day this week by Master Mechanic W. H. Lewis, and can say of a truth that as a thing of beauty it must be a joy forever, and as a combination of conveniences it knocks a “pocket in a shirt” all to smithereens, and excels anything we ever saw—in fact it is complete. It has recently been overhauled and remodeled throughout under Mr. Lewis’ supervision, and now contains all the comforts of a Grand Pacific or a Tremont in the small compass of a railroad car. At one end is the spacious drawing room beautifully and tastefully carpeted, ornamented and furnished. Then follows a series of apartments, five in number, conveniently arranged for berths at night or parlors by day, each separate and distinct from the rest, or all thrown into one at pleasure, affording excellent opportunities for a pleasant, uninterrupted tete a tete without the necessity of waiting for a tunnel, or a quiet smoke by yourself without offending the tastes of the company. These are supplied with clothes presses, wash room, closet, wine room, etcetera. Passing on you enter the dining room, which is simply in keeping with the rest of the car. The dining-table, Arab like, is folded up and laid away when not in use, leaving a very comfortable sitting room. Last, but not least, comes the kitchen, quite small in its proportions, though plenty large enough for all useful purposes, unless it might be to kiss the servant girl, there being room only for the cook. The cooking range we are satisfied could not be improved. It is made chiefly of wrought iron throughout, stands about eight feet high, and occupies a space in the corner about two by four feet square. The first or lower section of the range is the fire box, next comes the cooking apartment, next the baking oven, and above all a warming oven. At one side is a reservoir for heating water, in the middle of which is a coffee tank with the hot water all around it. In this the coffee is steeped by heat from the water, without coming in contact with the fire, which adds greatly to the flavor of this excellent morning beverage—with which the flavor is everything. On the opposite side, above, is a cold water tank, and a pipe each from this and the hot reservoir leads to the sink beside the range, affording hot and cold water faucets. On the other side of the room is a commodious refrigerator, table, root-bin, flour-bin, wood box, china closet, knife and spoon drawers, linen closet, and a profusion of small closets and drawers of a miscellaneous character. A passageway leads from the dining room around the kitchen on one side to the end of the car, thus avoiding interruption to the cook or danger of coming in contact with the pots and kettles in passing out at that end of the car. Upon the whole it is a rare combination of neatness, convenience and comfort, that speaks volumes for the inventive genius and systematic, architectural ability of Mr. Lewis and Sup’t. H. A. Towne, whose device it is, and for the exquisite skill of the workmen whose handiwork it bears. (Brainerd Tribune, 16 September 1876, p. 1, c.’s 6 & 7)

21 September
Gen’l. A. H. Terry and staff, consisting of Major Brisbin, Col. Benteen, Adjt. Smith and others, arrived here on Thursday from the front, en route for St. Paul. It is rumored that an effort is being made to have the General removed upon his arrival at St. Paul. (Brainerd Tribune, 23 September 1876, p. 1, c. 7)

30 September

The Brainerd Branch.


The St. Paul & Pacific Company sent an agent up here a few days ago to gather up and remove the fish plates, spikes, bolts, etc., at this place, belonging to that road, and he took away a full car load. Thus endeth the fitful and faded hopes of the much mooted Brainerd Branch. Sic transit gloria mundia. (Brainerd Tribune, 30 September 1876, p. 1, c. 6)

Wheat on the Northern Pacific.


We have procured from official and semi-official sources a statement of the wheat product in the Red River valley and along the line of the Northern Pacific Railroad, which is encouraging for the enterprising settlers of that region, and of interest to the people of the whole State.
The cultivation of wheat within the territory, spoken of is comparatively of recent date. Up to 1876 the amount grown was scarcely sufficient to meet the demand of home consumption. The yield for 1875 was about 500,000 bushels, of which 125,000 bushels went to Manitoba, and 40,000 bushels only found its way via the Lake route to Eastern markets.
The area under cultivation in 1875, all crops included, was some 75,000 acres, of which 30,000 acres was in wheat. The area in wheat alone for 1876 was 60,000 acres, making a total area under cultivation for all crops, of not less than 110,000 acres. In addition to this there has been broken up the present year of new ground some 80,000 acres for wheat cultivation for 1877.
The product of wheat the present year is estimated by those most competent to judge, at 900,000 bushels. The large additional area of new ground broken for cultivation next year requiring seed; the amount necessary for home consumption; and the large amounts of flour already contracted for delivery by local millers for the British Province of Manitoba, which is this year largely dependent on this source for a supply, will absorb a large per centage of the aggregate product stated, and consequently the amount that will find a market East will not exceed 400,000 bushels. The average yield per acre of the area sown this year is about twenty bushels, although some, possibly too sanguine, say it is greater. If nothing prevents the sowing of the immense new area prepared for cultivation next year, and no unforeseen calamity overtakes the growing of the crop, the general aggregate will reach the enormous amount of one million seven hundred thousand bushels. If the annual increase of area devoted to the cultivation of wheat keeps pace with the present year, within five years the aggregate wheat crop in the Red River Valley Railroad in Dakota, will equal the aggregate product of the present year’s crop in all Minnesota. Taking only the part of the Red River Valley embraced within the grant of lands to the Northern Pacific Railroad, it embraces thirty-two hundred square miles, or 2,048,000 acres. Fully eighty per cent of this vast area is said to be admirably adapted to wheat culture, and if fully utilized will produce thirty millions of bushels of wheat. But if the now warmly discussed project of a diversification of crops should prevail, it is still safe to say that at least one-half of the immense area spoken of will be successfully devoted to the culture of wheat.
The facts here given in brief are full of grave import to those seeking new homes in the West. Here millions of acres of excellent farming lands are suffered to remain in their pristine wilderness, although easy of access, convenient to railroads, and far from being destitute of timber. No finer field for immigration effort can anywhere be found than the work of bringing these important and cheering facts to the attention of the unemployed thousands in the East, who are looking for an opportunity of bettering their condition.—[St. Paul Dispatch. (Brainerd Tribune, 30 September 1876, p. 1, c. 6)

07 October

THE NORTHERN PACIFIC.
_____


From the Pioneer-Press and Tribune.
Mr. J. G. Williams, of the N. P. Junction, has been collecting some information in regard to the Northern Pacific railroad, and among other items of interest is the following accumulation of important and reliable facts from Mr. J. B. Power, agent of the land department of the N. P. Railroad company:
ST. PAUL. MINN., Aug. 19, 1876.
John G. Williams, N. P. Junction:
DEAR SIR:—Your favor of the 31st ult. to H. A. Towne, Superintendent, having been referred to this office, I would reply taking the interrogatories in order, as follows:
First—From lands within the limits of the grants to the Northern Pacific Railroad, and directly tributary to the road, the best information now attainable, enables me to estimate the yield of wheat for 1876 at from 850 to 900,000 bushels, all promising to be of the usual quality of Northern Pacific wheat, i. e. “extra No. 1 hard.” The large area of new ground plowed this year for the first time for cultivation next season; requiring seed, the amount of flour required for home consumption by the 30,000 or more people settled on the line of our road and tributary country, and the contracts already made for supply of flour for the British Province of Manitoba, which depends upon this section of country the next year for their breadstuffs, all of which is manufactured by the local mills on the line of road, will hold a considerable part of the crop from shipment to the eastern market. If the proportion of shipment to the yield is the same this year as the last, but from 350 to 400,000 bushels of the crop of 1876 will go forward to Duluth for lake shipment to eastern markets.
Second—The total yield of wheat in the same territory for the year 1875 was about 500,000 bushels, some 125,000 bushels went to Manitoba, 228,000 to Duluth, remainder held for seed and home use.
Third—Area under cultivation in 1875 to all crops, including hay culture, was some 75,000 acres, about 30,000 acres in wheat. Area to wheat in 1876 from 45 to 50,000 acres, for other crops the increase has been about 25 per cent. The total area under cultivation to all crops, at present date is not less than 100,000 acres.
Fourth—There has been this year not less than 60,000 acres (by some estimated at from 75 to 89,000) new ground broken for wheat cultivation in 1877. An ordinary crop next season will give a total yield of from 1,500,000 to 1,750,000 bushels, three-fourths of which will be sent forward to Duluth. The annual increase from this time forward will of course depend largely upon the yield and profits derived from the staple crop. There is no question, however, as to the probabilities of advancement. I think that in the future it will be in equal proportion to the past, and that the surplus crops after the next five years will be counted by the millions of bushels instead of as now by the thousands.
Fifth—The area now under cultivation to wheat within the limits of the land grant to this road as compared with what can be utilized for that purpose is so small that it can be said that the commencement has not yet been made.
Taking only that part of the Red River Valley embraced within the grant, that is, forty miles east and west, we have 3,400 square miles, or 1,049,000 acres, about the same area as is embraced in but three of the principal counties in southern Minnesota. Fully ninety per cent of this can, with mere cost of plowing, be put in condition for wheat culture, and would produce from 35,000,000 to 40,000,000 bushels annually. Under the ordinary process of cultivation, however, but one-half would be utilized for this purpose, say 4,000,000 acres, which with an ordinary crop, would produce 20,000,000 bushels, two-thirds of what is now the entire surplus crop of the whole State of Minnesota. When, however, we take into consideration the entire area of what is good wheat-producing land within the limits of the grant, and what is directly tributary to the road, using but the one-half of it for wheat culture, we have not less than 10,000,000 acres, capable of producing from one hundred and eighty to two hundred million bushels, we are reaching figures requiring a very comprehensive imagination to take in the possibilities of the future of this great northwest and the prospective value of the road that has been the means of opening this vast country to settlement.
The foregoing estimates are of course based upon the known capacity of the country for agricultural development, and as stated, the work of demonstrating its capacities has barely commenced. We are not in any way depending upon or discounting the future, but simply work upon what we now have, encouraging advancement by a liberal policy toward all who cast their lives with us, well knowing the circumstances beyond human control may so retard future progress, that even with the present promising outlook for rapid and constant advancement, it may be many years before the road will realize anything approximating what the country is capable of.
Sixth—The title to all lands within the limits of the grant from Duluth to the Missouri river, (the terminal point of the eastern division of the road as now built, a distance of 450 miles) is by the terms of the charter confirmed to the company, and as fast as is necessary, we are having them certified to us by the government.
Seventh—All of the agricultural lands of the company are in market at prices ranging from $2.50 to $10 per acre, according to quality and distance from road, and in payment for them the company take their first mortgage bonds at par and accrued interest, and the preferred stock of the company at par.
Eighth—The surface soil of the upland prairie is a dark sandy loam from 12 to 20 inches deep, in the Red River Valley it is a black alluvial mold from 15 to 30 inches deep. Subsoil as a rule is tenacious clay. In the hardwood timbered land the surface soil is as a rule a black sandy loam with a large proportion of vegetable clay subsoil.
Ninth—Cost of first breaking the sod is from $3 to $3.50 per acre. Cost of producing wheat, including price of seed, harrowing, seeding, harvesting, threshing, delivery at granary and fall plowing is from $9 to $10 per acre. Transportation from Red River to Lake Superior is now 15c per bushel. Frame dwelling house and barn, both comfortable and sufficient size for 160 to 320 acre farms can be built for from $600 to $1,000. In Dakota the herd law requiring cattle to be herded or fenced in, renders the fencing of wheat fields unnecessary.
There are many reasons that might be urged in favor of the Northern Pacific country as being more attractive to persons seeking new homes than any other in the northwest, but this is beyond the scope of this communication, and I will simply let the facts as stated advance their own arguments.
For a general description of the country traversed by the Northern Pacific road as now built and running, showing what parts of it are embraced in the grant and which in part by the development of the past three years has been so clearly demonstr